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Dondi12

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I certainly agree with both Steel and Silver on many points. I generally don't prefer fast rods but both of my salt rods are fast and one is extra fast and they do work very well in the intended environment. I am a warm water fisher and I do like slower rods. I also agree in the race to meet the hype of fast rods I do believe that the manufacturers have under stated the correct line wt. On my fast salt rods I have lined with the stated line wts though I have tried different wt lines and settled on stated wts. This is not to say that I would do that on all fast rods designed for salt. I have a short 2wt rod that I mostly fish and depending on my mood I line it with anywhere from a 2wt line to a 5wt line and it fishes quite well with them all. Just different. Speaking in generalities I line my rods with the stated line. The next part of the problem is the lines are not kept to meet the weight as set up by the powers to be so this also complicates the problem IMO. Some lines are mismarked by the manufacturer intentionally by at least one line wt just to cover the rod manufacturers mis labeling. As many here, I am an old dog and have quite a collection of lines which allows me to mix and match lines to see what works best for me. I feel sorry for newbies because they do not have that advantage. I had the same problem when I started and the choices were far less varied. I am still learning about all this stuff.

 

For any newbies following this thread I will relate something that I just learn this spring. I spent some time in the backyard sharpening my ability to make a quick cast with my 7wt . Fly in hand and a small loop of line hanging from the tip. My goal was to get the line in the air and with one front cast and one back cast get the fly out at least 50'. I bought a front heavy line with a short front taper and a long rear taper which cost me several $$$. I got the quick cast down pretty good but wanted to work on it some more but I didn't want to mess up my expensive line so I bought a cheap $20 sa line at Walmart do some more practicing with and anticipated that I would not be able to get as much line out the technique could still be helpful. What I actually found was that I could get just a long a line out with the cheap line on the quick cast as I could with the high dollar line. I feel that I can take either line to the beach and get the same results. I should also report that I tied up a fairly bushy fly on a 1/0 hook and then cut off the hook for practice. At this point it appears to me that all this line hype is just that. Hype. Take it for what it is worth.

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I don't think he actually made reference to the different casting abilities of individuals, merely the actual optimum line rating for a specific blank. I have 2 identical 5wt's that I built, I do best with a 5wt line on it, my wife has better success with a 6wt on it. My R & D guy throws it equally proficient and actually better that the 2 of us with a 4, 5, or 6wt on it. But in turn, the way he casts, he could probably throw it with a rope on it.

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1) I take the weight of the rod (actual) in grams.

2) Multiply that by the length of the rod in inches.

3) Multiply that by the length of the rod in cm.

4) Add the weight of the desired reel and fly line.

5) Subtract the weight of the fly, in ounces. This is your starting number.

6) Tape enough pennies to the rod to reach end to end. Multiply the starting number by the number of pennies required. This is the sub-total.

7) Add the price of the rod to the sub-total.

8) The final result will be the total.

 

The total is the number of time you'll have to cast before you catch your first fish using your favorite fly.

This is a general rule ... your result may vary.

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Sometimes I think some people would argue about the world being round.

 

What? I thought it was flat.

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1) I take the weight of the rod (actual) in grams.

2) Multiply that by the length of the rod in inches.

3) Multiply that by the length of the rod in cm.

4) Add the weight of the desired reel and fly line.

5) Subtract the weight of the fly, in ounces. This is your starting number.

6) Tape enough pennies to the rod to reach end to end. Multiply the starting number by the number of pennies required. This is the sub-total.

7) Add the price of the rod to the sub-total.

8) The final result will be the total.

 

The total is the number of time you'll have to cast before you catch your first fish using your favorite fly.

This is a general rule ... your result may vary.

LOL

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We don't have pennies here anymore since the euro came in Mike! What about euro cents? I'd love to find out whst wt this unkown yellow fly line is i have! Thanks for simplifying everything for me!

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