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Bud Guidry

spey fly

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i tried my first attemp at a spey fly being i've seen so many beautiful speys here i figure i might try to build them too. theres no pic because i figured you guys didn't want to see a mullet, well, a dead mullet. ok , ok a week old dead mullet. hehehe these flies are tough.

back to the drawing table on this one. may have to get some lessons on these babies, have the best day ever guys and gals, Bud

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Bud,

 

I would recommend getting yourself a book on tying these flies. I can think of three off the top of my head that have great tutorials on tying spey flies.

 

Steelhead Fly Tying Guide – By H. Kent Helvie

Spey and Dee Flies – By John Shewey

Spey Flies & How To Tie Them – By Bob Veverka

 

With one of these books and your natural skills you should be able to pick them up quicker than most of us.

 

Charlie

 

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CharlieD, are these for the rank beginner? (Like me?)

 

I'd like to try my hand, and will start with materials that are more "main stream", versus the "expensive" kind of exotics that are used...

 

THX

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Guest

What Charlie said. biggrin.gif

 

Actually, spey flies are for everyone. You don't have to use fine exotics to tie them. Use burnt goose for the hackle (usually sold as spey hackle) or the much accessible schlappen. Inexpensive and works great. You can buy cheap floss or use dubbing accessible at most shops inexpensively. Then use hackle tips for a wing and you're set. In fact, most people have all the components to make an inexpensive spey at their benches. Just applying them. The books above really do help.

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Hi Po:

Ive been tying them for a while now, and I just use fine stemmed chicken schlappen (natural) and br. mallard and the real trick seems just in the application of the wools and tinsels. the rest is pretty cheap and easy. But those wings can be tricky....go easy.

And have fun. For the old scotts, the main idea was something effective and CHEAP!

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I just got a copy of John Shewey's book.

Helped heaps. It covers everything from the history of the patterns plus bunches of techniques for winging and tinsel, lot of patterns to boot,old as well as new stuff.

I especially liked the section on Syd Glasso's style of spey tying. I have always used fairly inexspensive materials on almost all my fancy salmon flies, but, I will spring for the jungle cock eyes and nails for stuff I want to mount.

Tube blink.gif

 

 

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i have sheweys book, when i read the post i remembered i had it. i have most of what you guys mentioned in materials. i'm going to dig up the book tonight and make another attempt at it. i have blue eared, brown eared and white eared in the freezer for hackle and a couple other things laying around. i'll let you guys know how it turns out, thanks for all the info and help, Bud

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A couple of tips for spey flies:

 

While speys do not require exotic materials, *DO NOT SCRIMP ON YOUR WING MATERIALS*!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! The quality of your wing materials will make all the difference in your success with speys. Like someone else said, yarns (UniYarn works great), rayon or nylon flosses, etc., will do for bodies and schlappen for spey hackle (I recommenda against burned goose; the stems are thick and I hate the stuff.

 

Many spey patterns have multiple tinsels and learning to tie all of them in so that the ribbing is spaced correctly takes a few tries.

 

Finally, the mark of a well tied spey fly is a low wing set. To achieve this you need to avoid a hump behind the moutning point where the bofy ends and the hackle, tinsels, collar, etc are tied off.

 

Have fun!

 

Stu

 

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