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lewy271

Sinking line

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I'm dead set on the fact that I need a sinking line, maybe a shooting tip so I can blast some big flies out there... I have no idea what to buy...

 

I'm putting it on my 7 weight which I intend on fishing pike and largemouth with...

 

I don't fish real heavy current rivers all of them are fairly light in that respect. I am not sure if I need this but would like to try it out...

 

Any suggestions on lines....If anyone thinks I should just stick with floating line I would like to hear that too...

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Sinking lines rock I use S.A. streamer express lines and have hade better success with them. Once you get used to using them you wont want a floating line. unless you are fishing top water.

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Ya that line has peaked my interest I'm not sure if an intermediate sinking line is right... 6 IPS kinda scares me... Like I don't want to over do it but I guess I don't want to under do it either. Not sure if I should get something that has a sink rate around 2 or 3 IPS

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There are many options here, if you can tell me more about what your concerns are I will be able to answer better. If the water currents are slow the line you mentioned will work well. I have a 300 grain line that works well but find that spring floods, with high and swift currents tend to hold the line up in the water colloum. I am thinking of a faster sink rate. If you can go to a shop and try casting one of these lines. You will see how well they load a rod and how acurate long casts can be made, with only one backcast. This is great for streamer fishing, as your fly is in the water more.

I guess it all depends on how deep you want your fly, and how long you want to wait for it to get there. The faster it sinks the sooner you can retrieve the fly at that depth. Hope this helps because there are many options. Good luck

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I use a Rio class V full sinking line that has a sink rate of about 7 IPS or there abouts. Dont be to afraid to use a sink rate that fast because it really seems to me that it dosent seem like it really sinks that fast when used in moving water.

 

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Hi Lewy271,

 

Daryn had some great advice. I’m thinking if you’re fishing for bass and pike this new line will be for still-waters and slow flow. Although sink-tips and mini-tips work great in rivers and streams, they are hard to keep straight and tight to the fly in still water without hinging. I think a lot of guys get bit but miss striking because of a slack line. I would go with either an intermediate or slower full-sink line. You probably won’t be fishing real deep, staying around structure, and counting down a few more seconds beats stripping in because you’re on the bottom or below the zone. An intermediate in my experience, when stripped in, remains more horizontally level in the water column, when compared to faster sinking lines that come up at more of an angle, this can keep you in the zone longer. But every body of water is different. If I was only allowed to own one fly line, I would have an intermediate, problem is I have too many, and some never get used. I like fishing a clear-mono intermediate line in lakes. If dredging is necessary a weighted fly can work. But, there are guy’s who do real well fishing floating fly’s rigged a few feet behind a super-fast sinking line pulled along the bottom. I guess it’s fun trying a bit of everything.

 

Graham

 

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QUOTE
I use a Rio class V full sinking line that has a sink rate of about 7 IPS or there abouts. Dont be to afraid to use a sink rate that fast because it really seems to me that it dosent seem like it really sinks that fast when used in moving water.

 

There was an experiment done on sinking lines recently in an article I just read and it's true they aren't where they say they are in terms of IPS. It was a great article in the winter 2005 issue of Flyfishing and Tying Journal. Should still be on most shelves

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I've owned a few of them and don't think that any of them sink too much. Take this with a grain of salt though, since all of my applications are in moving water.

Depending on the desired depth, an integrated sinktip line might be your ticket. They come in different lengths and the belly of the line floats. Mine is a 15 footer, but I've seen them in a 25' as well.

 

Even at a high sink rate, the fly will not stay that deep while stripped, especially the larger more bouyant ones. Keep that in mind. wink.gif

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QUOTE (lewy271 @ Feb 11 2005, 04:27 PM)
I'm dead set on the fact that I need a sinking line, maybe a shooting tip so I can blast some big flies out there... I have no idea what to buy...

I'm putting it on my 7 weight which I intend on fishing pike and largemouth with...

I don't fish real heavy current rivers all of them are fairly light in that respect. I am not sure if I need this but would like to try it out...

Any suggestions on lines....If anyone thinks I should just stick with floating line I would like to hear that too...

Good choice! I fish a sink tip or full sinker about 70% of the time unless I'm on a small creek. For lake and pond fishing I prefer a full sinking line over a sink-tip. For rivers and creeks a sink-tip. For sink-tips, go with the fastest sinking formulation - I use an Orvis type V on my 6wt. Ten foot tip. Excellent for smallmouth fishing! On the lakes I prefer a type 3. A density compensated full sinker keeps a straighter line to the fly and the slightly slower sink rate doesn't detract in still water. Using a type 3 on my 5wt I can easily fish to 10' deep. Using a type 3 on my 8wt I fish to 15' or so with larger flies.

 

Joe C.

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Also don't rule out a shooting head system

 

Make a fast shooting head from when you want to dredge - or use a floating fly - kinda works like a Carolina rig.

 

Intermediate head when you want that slow sink to work a weed line.

 

Heck you can even have a floating head.

 

I use a SH for my 7wt which is the Yeoman of my rod collection it catches LL Salmon, Bass Pike and Stripers I have about 6 lines for it but I hardly ever use anything other than my shooting heads...

 

 

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IMHO, I think a sink tip, at least 6ips, is the only way to go. I fish for smallmouths in the Susquehanna. Always a current, and with a sink tip, you don't have to put all the lead on your streamers, so much better action. A fast sink tip will get you to the bottom and the streamer will suspend 4" off the bottom, right in the strike zone. In the summer, a intermediate of WF floating for the poppers.

In lakes where you fish, I would say a full sink line would be in order.

 

come on spring, it's snowing outside now, 6" of the stinkin' stuff already!!

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