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jfinn

Dubbing loop bs splitting thread

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Wondering why one over the other? The loop seems easier to make and with paper clip bent a couple times it is pretty easy to hold open the spin when ready to dub. I have spit thread a few times but feel it slows things down. What is the difference if any? Why would you use one over the other?

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split thread = dubbing loop

 

no?

 

dubbing loop = 2 thicker strands of thread vs 2 thinner strands

 

dubbing loop for heavier spiky dubbing and for bulky bodies

 

split thread for finer dubbing

 

tyers preference either way

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dubbing loop = 2 thicker strands of thread vs 2 thinner strands

 

+1 on this.

The best advantage of split thread, in my opinion, is the final "thickness" of the fly. Dubbing loop leaves twice as much thread on the fly as a split thread.

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split thread = dubbing loop

 

no?

 

dubbing loop = 2 thicker strands of thread vs 2 thinner strands

 

dubbing loop for heavier spiky dubbing and for bulky bodies

 

split thread for finer dubbing

 

tyers preference either way

 

I use both and agree with Flytire. Plus the loop has to be tied down, potentially creating bulk at the tie-down point.

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ive alwasy created dubbing loops with 1-2 wraps of thread so bulk at the tie in point is irrelavent as it will be eventually covered up by the the first wrap of the dubbing

 

heres a simple dubbing loop

 

 

heres a simple split thread dubbing loop

 

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I try not to use either, I prefer spinning the vise and feeding dubbing onto the thread forming a kind of rope. You do need, or helps anyway, to wax the thread. Then the wrapping process onto the hook shank pinches down the dubbing. I find this method to offer me the best control over material bulk, is quick and effective.

 

I will use split thread or a loop for heavier long hair dubbing though ( usually the latter), like angora goat for instance. Where really this is part of a streamer body , I'm thinking of a spin off ( pardon the pun) of a Purple Peril that I tie.

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Since learning to use split thread I rarely use a dubbing loop. They have advantages on different kinds of fly. It is a case of learn both and use whichever is appropriate for the job you are doing. At a push you can hammer in a screw but it isn't always the right thing to do.

 

One reason to use split thread over a loop is to avoid bulk when tying smaller flies. A dubbing loop uses three layers of thread to achieve what split thread achieves in one. The three layers of thread are the two legs of the loop, and the thread you have to wind along the hook shank to get it to the tie off point of the loop.

Conversely a dubbing loop is stronger for those times when bulk doesn't matter as much. When both the avoidance of bulk and strength are important split GSP thread.

 

There are many other things that can be done with fibres trapped in a loop or split thread that can't be done with other dubbing techniques. The Petitjean winging method for example.

 

Cheers,

C.

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If you're a cheap bass turd like me, you use a dubbing loop because you can't split sewing thread.

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If you're a cheap bass turd like me, you use a dubbing loop because you can't split sewing thread.

Of course.

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I prefer to look at it as "Dubbing Loop and Split Thread". Both techniques

offer a means of sturdy, more permanent attachment of materials.

 

For example, two patterns come to mind:

Maribou material in a dubbing loop, wound onto the body of a Balanced Leech pattern,

and a teeny bit of thorax fuzz split-thread dubbed on, in back of a spider's soft hackle.

 

 

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in all reality you could insert any type of material in either method

 

no wright or wrong nor pattern specific

 

it all boils down to tyers preference

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I try not to use either, I prefer spinning the vise and feeding dubbing onto the thread forming a kind of rope. You do need, or helps anyway, to wax the thread. Then the wrapping process onto the hook shank pinches down the dubbing. I find this method to offer me the best control over material bulk, is quick and effective.

 

I will use split thread or a loop for heavier long hair dubbing though ( usually the latter), like angora goat for instance. Where really this is part of a streamer body , I'm thinking of a spin off ( pardon the pun) of a Purple Peril that I

I assume your using a nor vice, or something with comparable speed to have enough friction to grab the dubbing?

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I try not to use either, I prefer spinning the vise and feeding dubbing onto the thread forming a kind of rope. You do need, or helps anyway, to wax the thread. Then the wrapping process onto the hook shank pinches down the dubbing. I find this method to offer me the best control over material bulk, is quick and effective.

 

I will use split thread or a loop for heavier long hair dubbing though ( usually the latter), like angora goat for instance. Where really this is part of a streamer body , I'm thinking of a spin off ( pardon the pun) of a Purple Peril that I

I assume your using a nor vice, or something with comparable speed to have enough friction to grab the dubbing?

 

Nope, you wouldn't believe what I'm using ( think loose bushings) ! You need to set the drag fairly free and spin the vise near the axis ( that helps gain just enough speed). Just use steady speed. A Horizontal inline mandrel is better than a bunch of swinging arms though, IMO, as it won't spin out of balance so much. A Norvise would be wonderful or any ball bearing inline ( regal comes to mind), I'd love to have that speed and smoothness in a vise but do not, my vise is quite a clunker !! You should try the technique if it interests you, there is nothing to lose., I use mostly rabbit based or blended rabbit /synthetic for it and some wax. Get the head turning steady and brush a fairly loose clump of dubbing up against the thread lightly, it will pick it right up ( much as Norms video on the Norvise shows only slower)..

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