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Landing fish

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I dont know why but i have the most difficult time landing fish. When out wadding i cant get the bloody fish into my net. Just the other day i was fishing and hooked into a really nice 19-20" rainbow. Of course it broke off as i was trying to get the stupid fish into the net. It happens to me all the time. I catch the fish, but cant complete the last step of landing and more often than not loose the fish. I reel in as much line as i can up to the indicator. Since where i fish on the Bow you usually use a 9' leader, i am left with 9' of line left out when trying to land the fish. My problem is that i cant get the fish close enough to me to get em in the net. It is always left just out of my reach. I hold the rod high and as far back as i can but i still cant get the fish close enough. I often have to rely on just dropping my rod and grabbing my leader, trying to hand line the fish in the last several feet to the net. This is when the fish usually brake off. The thing that i really hate is how long and difficult it is to get the fish in and released. It especially bothers me when there is someone in the area watching when i catch a fish. They watch as i a try to get the bloody fish into my net. Im sure it looks like i have no clue what i am doing, and that i may be even hurting the fish. This bothers me, which is why i want to figure out what im doing wrong and how to get the fish to the net. With several factors which include big fish, long leaders, and a fast current, i just cant effectively get the fish in. Any ideas on what i could try?

 

Thanks

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I've never tired to use an indicator or float 9 ft up a leader but it sounds like that is what is stopping you from reeling in a little more.

 

First rule of landing/netting fish when fly fishing with light tippets " don't touch the line" ! lol . I've had success in hand lining but with 1x or 2x tippet and then you have to be ready to let it run and get back on the rod. Place the net in the water and lead the fish into the net and scoop. But I don't scoop far, just enough to get the hook out.

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Try to get the fish up river of you and allow the fish to slide back into your net. This will allow the rod to be outstretched instead of that contorted down river, rod over the head net. You will find it much easier to lead the fish upriver of you, stand below the fish and with the rod out stretched you can handle that 9' of leader out of the rod tip.

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When fighting a big fish, I usually try to beach it. Once they are in shallow water, they can't fight effectively, and that takes the load off the tippet. A fish that is flip-flopping is easy to lead into the net.

 

Basically, though, I have to agree with Fishinguy, you need a longer net, or at least a longer handle on your net.

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Once they are in shallow water, they can't fight effectively, and that takes the load off the tippet.

I don't disagree with the post, but it's important to note that if you're going to beach a fish (fish health and safety concerns aside), that once it's out of the water, you lose the smoothing/damping effect of the water on the fish's head shakes and flops, and there's a lot more point/peak stress on your tippet as the fish flops, not to mention a lot more abrasion as it rubs on the sand and rocks and mud on the bank. Once you get the fish to the point where it's back is out of the water, it needs to have its momentum headed into the bank and you need to be ready to get up to it quickly.

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A long handled net will solve your problem. But I suggest thinking beyond the "longer net" solution and that is to get a longer fly rod. A longer rod will be more effective at nymphing and if you had a 10 or 11 ft rod, a 9 ft leader would not be a problem.

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i would suggest a long handled net and also trying to net as the fish is coming towards you, a lot of it is timing..However i did loose a nice brown myself yesterday because i lifted the fish on the net but it never slid into the net. it happens to the best of us from time to time.

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Guide the fish to the net. I've seen people lose fish at the net because they wait until the fish is close, then stab the net in the water to get it. The net should already be in the water as you guide the fish around. As has been stated, get the fish upstream so that you can then turn it downstream right into you and the net.

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I agree with those suggest the net be underwater and guiding the fish over the net. One additional tip is that when the fish gets a little over half way, drop the rod tip and raise the net as you drop the tip. The fish will go down head first into the net.

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A lot of good advice here, although I cringe at the idea of beaching a fishing unless absolutely necessary, and even then I'd usually rather lose the fish then resort to this technique.

 

One technological solution you might want to explore, other than a longer net, is 'breakaway' indicators. These are designed for deep nymphing conditions and the release when a fish strikes, essentially allowing you to reel in all the entire leader. Cascade Crest Tools (http://www.cascadecrest.com/) makes a variety of them, and there are other companies with the same product out there as well. While these are primarily used in still-waters when fishing deeper than 12', they might work for you as well.

 

That being said, a 9' leader is really not that long and you should be able to land fish with your existing rig. You are always going to lose fish, but if you keep in control, stage your net as suggested BEFORE you make your final lift to steer the fish to the net, you should be able to increase your landing percentage with a bit more practice.

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When fishing alone I try to make sure the fish is played out enough to net, and use a long net. This of course can bring up some issues when reviving the fish for release, as I rarely catch and keep Wild Trout. But with common sense and determination the trout swims off to be caught another day

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Use a slip bobber for an indicator. The bobber stop will pass through the guides and the bobber is free to slide down the leader.

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Watch this video of Jim Misiura and how he nets all his fish. Watch any of his other videos when he is fishing with someone else and how instructs them to get the fish upstream and slide back into the net.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It really does work and I have been doing it without losing any fish as you describe. Also note that there is no contorting of the rod over the head and having to twist your body into a pretzel.

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"break away" indicators are basically litter, right? It's a mortal sin to beach a trout but it's ok to throw litter in the stream?

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