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goofnoff

Snowshoe rabbit feet

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Are the wild ones superior to what you can buy in the store?

 

Maybe I am just repeating a rumor but I have read on other FF BBs that most of the "snowshoe" rabbit feet sold is actually European Hare that was imported to, and now is a pest in Australia. So rumor has it that the "snowshoe" feet being sold is actaully from European hare in Australia.

 

Real snowshoe rabbits are trapped in winter and they have more water repellant fur on thier feet than European hare.

 

I have actually been tying a lot with Utah Jackrabbit feet... The verdict? they make great flies. The crinkly nature of the fibers is what traps air and causes them to be buoyant. I have used all nature of rabbit-ish feet and they all work.

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Are the wild ones superior to what you can buy in the store?

 

Maybe I am just repeating a rumor but I have read on other FF BBs that most of the "snowshoe" rabbit feet sold is actually European Hare that was imported to, and now is a pest in Australia. So rumor has it that the "snowshoe" feet being sold is actaully from European hare in Australia.

 

Real snowshoe rabbits are trapped in winter and they have more water repellant fur on thier feet than European hare.

 

I have actually been tying a lot with Utah Jackrabbit feet... The verdict? they make great flies. The crinkly nature of the fibers is what traps air and causes them to be buoyant. I have used all nature of rabbit-ish feet and they all work.

 

So can you compare the stuff sold by the pair, in a bag on a peg at the fly shop to "legit" snowshoe? Would the real thing be longer fur, more buoyant, etc?

 

Just trying to get an idea of what one might be missing out on by using the store bought stuff.

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Are the wild ones superior to what you can buy in the store?

 

Maybe I am just repeating a rumor but I have read on other FF BBs that most of the "snowshoe" rabbit feet sold is actually European Hare that was imported to, and now is a pest in Australia. So rumor has it that the "snowshoe" feet being sold is actaully from European hare in Australia.

 

Real snowshoe rabbits are trapped in winter and they have more water repellant fur on thier feet than European hare.

 

I have actually been tying a lot with Utah Jackrabbit feet... The verdict? they make great flies. The crinkly nature of the fibers is what traps air and causes them to be buoyant. I have used all nature of rabbit-ish feet and they all work.

 

So can you compare the stuff sold by the pair, in a bag on a peg at the fly shop to "legit" snowshoe? Would the real thing be longer fur, more buoyant, etc?

 

Just trying to get an idea of what one might be missing out on by using the store bought stuff.

 

It's all very similar. I killed a few cottontails last year, and even though they are much smaller the foot fibers were plenty long. For what it's worth, one of the desirable features of a snowshoe hare is that the feet are pretty big, and that they are white a lot of the time during harvest (making them easier to dye.) I'm not picky at all with the feet that I have. They are all pretty good.

 

Also, I have some "legit" snowshoe feet that I have been tying with for 15 years, and I have some of the stuff that is available through Nature's Spirit... I can't tell the difference. The only main change is that they are now sold one foot at a time instead of a pair.

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Thanks for the honest eval.

 

 

 

The only main change is that they are now sold one foot at a time instead of a pair.

Thanks Obama. tongue.png

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