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January Flies from the Vise

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So Mike, is it too cold outside? Is that why you are in a nice warm hotel room tying? Not cold here but the wind is howling 25-30.

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Boise Bug - Daniel Briley

Hook Tiemco 200R Size 6-8 depending on the size of the bugs in the river.
Thread: Brown or black 6/0
Tail: Goose Biot (brown or black)
Underbody: Weighted heavily with 0.030" wire, topped with 0.015" wire
Abdomen: Brown or black latex nymph skin
Legs: Heavy Upholstery thread, knotted
Thorax: Blend of orange, golden or brown antron dubbing to match local bug colors
Wing Cases: Thin Skin - (brown or black)
Eyes: Black bead chain
Antennae: Coats & Clark thread
Varnish: Sally Hansen Hard as Nails Brown sparkle or black

This is the best stonefly nymph pattern I have ever found. I have modified this fly over the years to make it more durable, and more effective. I have had enormous success in any western stream that has a healthy population of stoneflies in it, from the Madison to Box Canyon of Henry's Fork, to the Boise River where I first tied this pattern and which hears its name.

The picture here shows a brown version I tied, next to a live bug from the Boise River last October. Some of the live bugs are more brown in color, some are more black in color. I am 6'7" with very large hands, so the size of the fly and the bug are larger than they may appear.

I have found that the knotted thread legs are much more durable than the rubber legs, pheasant tail or the goose biot leg versions I have tried before. They are also much easier to tie in and work with on the vise.

This is a heavily weighted fly, so I can fish it without any additional weight on most sections of the river.



Tying Instructions:

1) Place one segment of heavy lead wire on each side of the hook from the hook point up to about 1/8" from the eye, and wrap them to form a flattenened body.
2) Wrap the fine 0.015" lead wire over the top of the flattened body to add weight and add bulk.
3) Using smooth pliers or the inside of your tweeezers, flatten the wrapped wire to flatten the body again.
4) Tie in the Latex at the base of the fly
5) Tie in the goose biots just above the latex tie in point
6) Wrap the latex up about 2/3 of the hook shank to form the abdomen. The first wrap should be under the tips of the goose biots to help help them spread slightly. Do not wrap too tightly, so the latex forms a nice segmented body.
7) Take the upholstery thread (mine is brown, but most any dark color will do), and tie a knot in one end, leaving about 1/4" to the end. Tie another knot about 1/2" away on the same piece of thread. Trim the thread 1/4" from the second knot so you have one piece of thread with 2 knots in it that are about 1/2" apart. Make 3 of these leg thread segments. The gap between the knots will vary slightly between them, that is OK. Lay the 3 knotted thread segments on the tying bench, and arrange them from the longest knot gap to the smallest knot gap.
8) Take the knotted thread segments and tie them in from longest to shortest, from back to front of fly, leaving a 1/8" gap between each segment, and a 1/8" gap to the eye of the fly.
9) Tie in the beaded chain segment for the eyes directly in front of the front legs.
10) Wrap the thread back to the rear legs and dub the thorax between the rear legs and the middle legs, with a wrap or two of dubbing behind the rear legs.
11) Trim the Thin Skin to shape and tie in the tip in front of the middle legs, extending back over the rear legs.
12) Dub the thorax between the middle legs and the front legs, with a wrap or two of dubbing behind the middle legs.
13) Trim a second piece of Thin Skin to shape, leaving a slightly longer tip section than the rear piece. Tie in the tip in front of the front legs, tightly behind the bead eyes, with the wing case extending back over the middle legs, and the tip extending over the eyes and the hook eye.
14) Tie in the antennae behind the bead eyes, and under the wing case you just tied in. Pull the antennae to the left and right of the fly, just in front of the bead eyes.
15) Pull the tip of the middle wing case over the top of the bead eyes, and tie it down behind the hook eye. Make sure the antennae remain on the left and right of the fly, in front of the eyes.
16) Build a good sized head and whip finish.
17) Take the Nail Polish and put a good coating over the abdomen and wing cases. Also put a good coating over the knotted legs and antennae. It helps to lift the wing cases with the bodkin while applying the nail polish, so you can coat the underside as well as the top side. Start in the back and work forward. Let dry.

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That will probably catch some fish, Decisions.

 

But I always wonder about crawdad patterns.

I will get around to tying craw patterns at some time ... and I will not put a "tail" on them.

Having something hanging out in front of the hook eye, is just going to be another place for weeds and mosses to collect and foul the presentation.

 

If you left that piece off the front, and had the orange bead exposed, it would (probably) draw more strikes and (maybe) be a bit more weed resistant.

Thanks Mike.

 

I agree with you 100% about the tail over the bead. Taking it off won't be difficult and certainly won't stop a fish from striking. It just looks cool! LOL

 

Cheers, Ron

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attachicon.gifIMG_1240.JPG

 

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Boise Bug - Daniel Briley

 

Hook Tiemco 200R Size 6-8 depending on the size of the bugs in the river.

Thread: Brown or black 6/0

Tail: Goose Biot (brown or black)

Underbody: Weighted heavily with 0.030" wire, topped with 0.015" wire

Abdomen: Brown or black latex nymph skin

Legs: Heavy Upholstery thread, knotted

Thorax: Blend of orange, golden or brown antron dubbing to match local bug colors

Wing Cases: Thin Skin - (brown or black)

Eyes: Black bead chain

Antennae: Coats & Clark thread

Varnish: Sally Hansen Hard as Nails Brown sparkle or black

 

This is the best stonefly nymph pattern I have ever found. I have modified this fly over the years to make it more durable, and more effective. I have had enormous success in any western stream that has a healthy population of stoneflies in it, from the Madison to Box Canyon of Henry's Fork, to the Boise River where I first tied this pattern and which hears its name.

 

The picture here shows a brown version I tied, next to a live bug from the Boise River last October. Some of the live bugs are more brown in color, some are more black in color. I am 6'7" with very large hands, so the size of the fly and the bug are larger than they may appear.

 

I have found that the knotted thread legs are much more durable than the rubber legs, pheasant tail or the goose biot leg versions I have tried before. They are also much easier to tie in and work with on the vise.

 

This is a heavily weighted fly, so I can fish it without any additional weight on most sections of the river.

 

FRn said: "...

 

 

Welcome to FTF, following up with most amazing 1st post ever... Carry On... post fish photos when you have such..."

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Very nice tie KingHap.

 

Only one thing if I may point out. The live stone has 5 legs where as you tied yours with 6. (grin)...biggrin.png

 

Cheers, Ron

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A couple more foam spiders. I didn't have any light colored rubber legs, so I use some thread.

Okay, I used a lot of thread.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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BCT tied my scud pattern from one of my videos.
Best I've seen with someone else tying my pattern.

16178912_1450013495009954_32707308094655

Kimo

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BCT tied my scud pattern from one of my videos.

Best I've seen with someone else tying my pattern.

 

16178912_1450013495009954_32707308094655

 

Kimo

Not bad at all :)

You're still the bomb though mate ;)

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