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FreshH20

Dubbing Loop

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wax is not required

 

full.jpg

 

wet a sponge and pot it in a cup/bowl and wet your fingers before taking out wisps of dubbing. the dub onto your thread

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yes i do know what i'm doing but most dubbing will tend to loosen up after 1-3 wraps forward and must be retightened on the thread before continuing to wrap forward (watch a davie mcphail video and youll see him retighten the dubbing often)

 

so does reverse wrapping the dubbing noodle forward tighten the dubbing thats already on the thread??

 

again, heres a good article on dubbing techniques

 

https://thelimpcobra.com/2013/01/08/fly-tying-a-complete-dubbing-techniques-tutorial/

 

watching norlander applying dubbing is quite unique and made possible by his higher rpm spinning head on his vise. there are no other vises that i know of that can achieve that rpm. you cant spin a renzetti that fast smile.png

I've done Norlander's technique very successfully on my crappy India made vise with a sloppy head on it. High Speed Rotation is not the issue but steady rotation at a reasonable speed is. You should try it with your Renzetti, it comes out plain A** awesome. Believe me, if I can do it with my goofy vise anyone with a rotating vise can too. If you can rotate your vise round and round at a good steady pace it will work. Same with the peacock herl rope, although I don't do that much, I more do it just by hand.

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I will use a dubbing loop and a dubbing noodle. Just depends what kind of a mood I'm in. I have even switched back and forth in the same tying session on the same pattern. Even tried Norm's method on my rotary.

 

One thing I have noticed is quite often folks tend to use way to much dubbing. Just think of fuzzy thread. If need be it's easier to add than remove any excess.

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as with a dubbing loop and trimming off the excess, you can do the same thing with split thread dubbing technique (splitting hairs i guess smile.png)

 

to the OP, learn as many techniques that you can then eliminate the ones that are not suitable to you

 

Whatever floats ye boat.

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From Dave G - "On small flies a dubbing loop may produce too much dubbing or body material."

 

Definitely so!

On small flies, I try to think 2 to 3X the thread thickness when building the 'noodle'.

 

FreshH2O, I've had good luck starting the dubbing noodle on thread, then pushing the noodle up so it contacts

the hook shank, then making one thread wrap around the shank. This anchors one end of the noodle, and from there,

continue on with building the noodle as necessary. It's a trick I've learned from watching Davy McPhail's videos.

 

Also, for small flies, my best results are from using super fine dubbing to begin with.

It does make a difference.

 

 

Lots of good solid advice from others on this thread!

 

 

 

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Wow! great article flytire, the limp cobra article was about as much detail on one technique I've seen in a while. Nice. Yep, it helped.

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For small flies and thin bodies with a hint of haze around them, try touch dubbing. Just apply sticky wax to the thread and touch fine dubbing to the thread and apply to the hook. Thread color is an important choice as it will show through,

 

Rocco

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