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swampsinger

Trouble with rod

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I read just yesterday on a big rod (Swift Fly Fishing) company's site that spine was usually set at 90* to the guides on factory rods, theory being that spine in line with the guides would cause some deflection either on the back cast or the forward cast, leading to odd line tracking. It said Don Green of Fenwick and Sage fame advocated this method.

 

Makes me wonder at spine and rod orientation having anything to do with exploding/breaking carbon rods.

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The whole spine / not spinning always is a back & forth thing among rod builders. Most builders when they first start out will find the spine, then as they build more and more rods they drift to simply building on the straightest axis. The spine of a rod is very easily overcome with any amount of pressure and really has nothing to do with power or breakage at all. Over the years myself as well as many other builders have built two identical rods (one with guide on spine and one on straightest axis) and found zero difference in casting or feel. The only time spine "might" make any difference is in something such as a deep sea rod like a tuna rod where you have a tremendously stiff rod blank then there is a chance it'd come into play, but for anything else the spine of a rod does not affect strength, casting, or breakage and is nothing more than just something some companies/builders like to throw around to make building seem even more like black magic.

 

The whole spin/spline thing really started years ago back in the 70's/80's with Dale Clemens rod building book. That's when many people read what he said and took it as truth. Thing is that was 40 yrs ago, the process and materials for building blanks and the scrim and such has advanced hugely since that book and a lot of things are no longer true, if they even were at the time it was written. There are some that will disagree with me, but that's been going on for years with those that like to spine so nothing new there wink.png

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Often there can be a slight curve in the outer tip section on the spine. Add to that the little weight of guides and epoxy and thread and the tip can take a bit of a sag to it when complete. I now build mine reverse spine on the outer two sections of a 3 or 4 piece of the tip section of a 2 piece .. Additionally if there is anything to be gained from spining the rod I can use all the spine I can get on my back cast.. Further, often building on best axis also if one were to check, will find fairly often that it's on the reverse spine that you attain the best axis ( not always) . I don't know except that it works for me so that's how I build them now. My last three builds were that way and they cast awesome. Two of those are 4 wt rods and both have been bent almost into a U with good sized fish in close to net them or unhook them ( that's kind of why I like iM6 and also that Matrix material graphite,not sure I trust real high modulous stuff lol). IM6 might be a little heavier but it's forgiving in my experience, the only time I've busted it is with a spare tire bouncing off the rod or a good old fashion slam in a door.

 

I bet loose furrels not attended to breaks more rods under fish stress than anything else. Or else a good sized nick in the surface at a critical spot..

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Lastly, for a rod joint that wants to work loose here's a tip I believe came from Lefty Kreh many years ago... Assemble that joint straight in but slightly off of alignment. When the two parts are firmly together - then rotate the sections into alignment (so that the joint is assembled like a bayonet coupling. This should solve your problem...

 

That's always worked for me.

 

Just don't try it with metal ferrules. rolleyes.gif

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Metal ferrules are definitely a different proposition. When I first started fishing down here in paradise (south Florida) there were many, many rods with metal ferrules (this was about five years before the first "graphite" rods... Item number one - never, never leave a rod with metal ferrules assembled when not in use since you risk the joined ferrules becoming bound up permanently... What we used to do is every now and then we'd use a bit of the finest steel wool (size 0000) with a bit of quality gun oil to clean off the male section - then wipe away almost all of the remaining oil residue... I knew some that would wax their ferrules (but this sort of stuff might never be needed in a freshwater environment...). As metal ferrules were phased out I saw less and less of them on rods needing a guide or two - and I was glad to see them go. I know that high end split bamboo rods still have them - but doubt I'll ever be handling one since they're a bit fragile for what we get up to....

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I thought I would update y'all. I added a small amount of bees wax to the ferrules, and it worked great, 4 outings and I've forgotten I had a problem.

thanks

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With a rod that young (new?), I would check with the manufacturer for advice or warranty coverage. Good luck.

 

 

Thanks, Bob H

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