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jacktjl

Trip to Grand Tetons & Yellowstone in September 2018

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Hello Everyone,

 

I expect to be doing a lot of sight seeing in these two National Parks in mid September. I plan on taking along a fly rod to take advantage of opportunities as they present themselves. Any ideas on flies and access points to smaller streams and or lakes (from the bank) during this time of year would be appreciated. Also if you have ideas where I could access the Snake river for stream-side fishing that would be appreciated as well.

 

 

Thanks,

Tim

 

 

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pick up the aug-sept issue of fly fisherman magazine for an article on the snake river in wyoming and other areas to fish

 

local jackson hole fly shops can point you to the access points

 

i have only fished it from a drift boat

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Since no "local responses" my $.02 is check one of many sites and videos from Google. Fished Fierhole and Madison last June and water was stained/still some snow around. The Snake was muddy around JH but should be fine by your trip. We drove up from Idaho from the Henry's Fork were we stayed and caught our fish. Tried the Gibbon for grayling no luck. We didn't see GT. We were too early you should be perfect for steam conditions on your trip. I envy you....what a wonderful place! Lotta info here.

https://www.montanaangler.com/fly-fishing-yellowstone-park/firehole-river

 

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Thanks Flytire and Denduke. Good ideas for me to follow up on. I appreciate the feedback.

 

Tim

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In June one Yellowstone trip and early Sept the other trip and both times saw snow in the high places, might want to carry a jacket, When we lived in Id. the mountain nearby always got fresh snow the last week of August.

I fished some streams in the Yellowstone Park from the bank but so long ago that I have forgotten the details. As I recall those waters were turbulent and flies needed lots flotation. google is your friend, I'll guess there are several fly shops and outfitters in the areas that can get specific on color of grasshopper.

I recall Parks Fly Shop ( http://reports.parksflyshop.com/general-fishing-report/ ) in Gardiner Mt and know there are several in Livingston as well, about an hour from the north gate of Yellowstone to Livingston.

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Yes! I did a little fishing in this area.... There are many access points along the Snake River from Jackson downriver. Much more access upstream into the park. The Snake is pretty big, even this time of year and its hard to fish from the bank. Try the Snake up by Jackson Lake. Felt sole boots and a staff are absolutes.

Keep in mind that there is another local fisherman that frequents these streams, lakes and rivers. His first name is Ursus and last is Horribilus! Us common folk just call him Grizzly! Just keep that in the back of your mind and be aware!! The drivers are much more dangerous.

Definitely fish Flat Creek on the National Elk Refuge. You can get access at the Fish Hatchery. Lots of undercut banks and slow water. Big cutthroat up there. Be stealthy and quiet and don't get skylined. You just might catch a trophy here. Sculpin patterns and wooly buggers.

Yellowstone Lake is also good. Probably gonna be crowded, and if you catch a fish... plan on entertaining for a while. Leech patterns and wooly buggers.

Yellowstone Cutthroat are easy to catch and not as piscivorous as Snake River Cuts. Once the Snakes get over about 16, 18 inches they become fish eaters. Lots of sculpins in these waters. Muddlers work well, but if I only had one fly it would be an olive bodied wooly bugger with a little flash. Black tail and black hackle. 8, 6, 4 long shank nymph hook weighted heavy. Tie some with grizzly and brown hackle too. Too much flash spooks them I think. I used to use an olive chenille that had flash woven into the chenille. I haven't looked for it in decades, but it was perfect. No more than 2 or 3 strands of flash in the tail.

Can't advise much on nymphs and dries. As you can tell, I'm a big fly kinda guy with big line. Less stress on the fish.

Just for the record, I speak in present tense, but I lived nearby in the '90s. For all I know, the river could have dried up, the lake trout may have eaten all the Yellowstone Cuts. Hell, I heard there was a big gas bubble below Yellowstone Lake that might explode any day. That didn't happen did it?

Oh. I always have a variety of Bitch Creek Nymphs on hand for testing new water.

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Thanks all I really appreciate the help and suggestions especially the fly options as I would like to tie up a few in advance. I certainly will hit the local fly shops as well but want to prepare in advance and the ideas you have suggested will definitely help.

 

Thanks again,

 

Tim

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A primo place: Flat Creek, gin clear, spring creek waters, cutthroats to 8 pounds or so, you MUST walk in, slow crawling even better, hard work, big rewards, will challenge you in every phase of flyfishing- long casts, great presentation, small flies, spider-web tippets, are all mandatory.

 

There is an abundance of places around Jackson, WY and several very good shops that will steer their customers to dozens of different sites. My .02 (but I have been there and done it, and smiling now just thinking of it) Hope you have great luck!

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Might be too late - but just got back from an August trip out there. Fished the Yellowstone, Madison, Soda Butte Creek and Snake. Highlight had to be Soda Butte Creek in Yellowstone. Terrestrials are the name of the game (think foam) although we also did well on Parachute Adams, droppers and a big 'ol streamer. Most effective fly on the Madison was something they called a "Chili Stone" - basically and smaller Chubby Chernobyl. Here's a link to the fly pattern: Chili Stone

 

Fishing in Yellowstone requires a separate permit - and felt is banned.

 

Here's a shot of my son with one of the nicer Yellowstone Cutthroats he caught:

xOeDuTu.jpg

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Might be too late - but just got back from an August trip out there. Fished the Yellowstone, Madison, Soda Butte Creek and Snake. Highlight had to be Soda Butte Creek in Yellowstone. Terrestrials are the name of the game (think foam) although we also did well on Parachute Adams, droppers and a big 'ol streamer. Most effective fly on the Madison was something they called a "Chili Stone" - basically and smaller Chubby Chernobyl. Here's a link to the fly pattern: Chili Stone

 

Fishing in Yellowstone requires a separate permit - and felt is banned.

 

Here's a shot of my son with one of the nicer Yellowstone Cutthroats he caught:

xOeDuTu.jpg

Gorgeous Lunker!

 

Many thanks for the Link to the Pattern!

 

:)

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