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flytire

super chicken

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At least six forms of human prion diseases, not counting those transmitted from squirrels and cows; and of those six only kuru is caused by cannibalism, others seem to be somewhat hereditary.

Sheep have had prion disease for thousands of years, people eat sheep and don't get sick-cows eat sheep and get the disease, deer confined with sheep get a mutated form of the disease- yet there are no instances of people or dogs getting prion disease from deer. It is believed that scavenging birds may spread prion disease and those birds are protected, it has been found that prions are in the feces of infected animals and then is absorbed by the plants that grow there and can then be passed on through the food chain. Probably meaning that eventually canned corn may be a source of spongiform encephalopathy. Or your favorite salad greens that a deer wet on.

 

What grains run 20% protein by weight? Chickens, like humans are omnivores and require animal proteins for best health, free range is to allow that need to be filled by bugs, but what of all the zillions of birds raised and consumed that never see a bug? I'm guessing the "protein division" of the meat processing plant is shipping direct to a "feed mill". What kind of meat goes into what kind of feed?

 

Truth is we haven't got any real understanding of prions or how they will affect our future and to date no one is spending the money needed to advance our knowledge; In fact there many in the commercial deer industry that insist CWD is harmless and a waste of money to study. Same people that feed ground up antler to bucks to promote antler growth, or so I have read.

 

And feathers are nothing more than specialized reptile scales, something I had not been aware of.

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Of course ... all of the above just points out that we are not immune to a number of diseases, infection, infestations, etc.. All we do to stop or slow those issues is just creating stronger or new issues.

It's only a matter of time before a "bug" pops up that we can't stop and that is hugely successful at killing humans. The planet Earth NEEDS it, but it probably won't happen soon enough to save the planet.

 

Do everything you want to do. Don't wait, do it. You never know when it'll be too late and all you'll have are regrets for what you DIDN'T do.

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Not really, Silver. I mean, it does a good job of killing hosts ... but it's not easily transmittable. It's not nearly the "pandemic" type disease people think it is.

 

I was in Monrovia, Liberia when it struck there. I left for home two days before they shut down the airport. The living conditions there are horrible. No electricity for a majority of the city. No running water or sewage in many areas. No trash collection for most "suburbs". People living in huts practically on top of each other.

 

Ebola hit and a VERY small portion of the population contracted it. If it didn't spread easily in those conditions ... it's never going to be a world-wide killer. It's scary, ugly killer, but it's easy to avoid.

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Eating nerve tissue from an animal with spongioform encephalopathy such as "mad cow disease", or chronic wasting disease in deer can give the disease to the person who eats it. As far as I know birds don't have this disease, just mammals. Seems to be primarily from ruminants. Perhaps eating brains is a bad idea.

 

They slaughter 12 million chickens per week in MS for consumption. The birds are 45 days old when slaughtered. It takes less than 1 1/2 pounds of chicken feed. Amazing. And MS is the number 4 state in the union for broiler production. Poultry is a huge business. Chickens used for tying are a miniscule part of the industry, but the meat probably doesn't get wasted. "Parts is parts"

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I've read quite a bit about Dr. Tom Whiting I saw a movie clip about his business, if I'm not mistaken his roosters are between 11 & 18 months old depending on the breed when he harvests them. As for being able to hold them without getting pecked or slashed from the spurs, that's one of the traits he breeds into the chickens. I'm sure he got pecked and slashed a lot when he first started his business.

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You guys really know how to wreck a couple of beautiful images of wonderful chickens. biggrin.png biggrin.png I really just wanted to see pretty birds, now I gotta think about mad cow chickens and Ebola and cannibalism, and spongiforms.

 

I personally don't think it's a shame to kill that chicken for his feathers. His feathers is the only reason that chicken even exists. He had a pampered life, never had to fight for a meal. Never had to fight a bug, worry about disease or predators. I bet his chicken coop is the best chicken coop anybody ever saw. He never even got his feathers dirty. I bet he even got to breed quite a bit before he died, and I bet he didn't have to fight other roosters to do it either. And to top it all off, when he died, he died the most humane death we could possibly think of. You wouldn't want to ruffle a single feather on his head, or his cape, or his flanks or tail.

 

Every living thing must die. The shame of it is when an animal suffers in life, dies a brutal death and is not appreciated in life and is wasted in death. Just my humble opinion, your mileage may vary. This rant is all you guys fault anyway,biggrin.png Remember.... I just wanted to look at pretty birds.

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10-12 weeks then they are caped out for feathers. commercials birds are used in pet foods not human. I prefer to wait till they are 1 year old letting them molt at least once. I had a rooster that went from dun colored wings and saddle to pure white after molting, My cree is 4 now and has turned darker with age.

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