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Freddo

Make Chenille Loose the Carded Look

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Hi All -

 

The last time I tied woolly buggers, I was wondering and never asked how to get the fibers to not look like the material has been wrapped around the card the material comes on for years.

 

When wrapped on the hook, I'm after a fuller body. Does anyone know of a method? I'm buying the standard material you all probably have from the same great fly shops and stores. So far, the fish have not been concerned but as I up my tying game, I want a nicer looking fly before the fish teeth change all of that! Hee hee!

 

Please let me know - thanks!

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remove the entire length off the card. steam the entire length and place the chenille in a small zip lock bag

 

example (substitute chenille)

 

Xnuy7n5.jpg

 

do not put it back on the card

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A few years ago I came across "fast ropes". Originally carried by Samurai, they deploy quickly from their wrapped up state, without tangling. What has this to do with fly tying? Well it is the idea of it never tangling made me think. One of the secrets of a fast rope not tangling is a figure of 8 wrap. If you wrap your material, whatever it is, in a figure of 8 around 2 fingers, then place the ziplok bag over the material and take your fingers out. You now have the material in the bag in such a way you can draw it out without tangling. Cut off one bottom corner, then fish the end out through the cut corner with tweezers.

 

I find this a useful trick with carded material. Might help you.

Cheers,

C.

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A few years ago I came across "fast ropes". Originally carried by Samurai, they deploy quickly from their wrapped up state, without tangling. What has this to do with fly tying? Well it is the idea of it never tangling made me think. One of the secrets of a fast rope not tangling is a figure of 8 wrap. If you wrap your material, whatever it is, in a figure of 8 around 2 fingers, then place the ziplok bag over the material and take your fingers out. You now have the material in the bag in such a way you can draw it out without tangling. Cut off one bottom corner, then fish the end out through the cut corner with tweezers.

 

I find this a useful trick with carded material. Might help you.

Cheers,

C.

 

Thank you -- it makes total sense! I keep my all my ear buds stored wrapped in a figure of 8 and I show this to band members and call it a life hack! never thought to apply it to chenille - nice idea and thanks again!

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There is an alternative that solves several problems with chenille on woolly buggers. Dont use it. Dub your bugger bodies instead.

 

http://www.jsflyfishing.com/blog/to-dub-or-not-to-dub-woolly-buggers/

 

I abandoned chenille well over a decade ago and have the buggers to prove it.

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I agree with mikemac1. There are few cases where I use chenille anymore. Montana Nymphs, Palomino Midge, San Juan Worm, and that's about it. I use peacock herl, ostrich herl, or dubbing in most other cases. If you twist the herl with tying thread, it makes it really strong. Dubbing works where herls are not appropriately colored.

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The important thing is, it doesn't matter, the material gets soft when wet and it all looks different. Most body materials are there to provide a silhouette and the other things like tail, wing and head distract the fish from close examination.

 

I spool all my chenille on sewing machine bobbins and use a bobbin holder to apply. But I also use yarn, chenille and dubbing interchangeably.

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There is an alternative that solves several problems with chenille on woolly buggers. Dont use it. Dub your bugger bodies instead.

 

http://www.jsflyfishing.com/blog/to-dub-or-not-to-dub-woolly-buggers/

 

I abandoned chenille well over a decade ago and have the buggers to prove it.

 

Thanks and very interesting. I soon might have a "shoe box full of now pretty much useless chenille" too....! :) This is also great because it helps me and other tiers learn to tihnk outside the "pattern" / "recipe". This is my 4th winter tying and the first I've just grabbed materials I've accumulated and picked this and that and built flies. Now for the Woolly Buggers.

 

Thanks again for the pointer to that great read!

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Interesting. I just got back from the Fly Fishing Show in Edison, NJ. I brought a couple of yards of three different estaz chenille. They're loose in a bag right now. When I recover from the drive home, I plan to wrap the pieces on plastic cards. All my chenilles are wrapped on cards and I've never had a problem with them kinking on me. Maybe because they're loosely wrapped on the cards. If you're using sparkle chenilles you might try twisting them before you wrap them.

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THANKS ALL!

 

I plan to try the steam but tied a bugger with Senyo's dub and like the results a lot. I won't be tossing or no longer use the chenille I have on hand, but I will tame the material before it gets to a hook shank!

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