Jump to content
Fly Tying
Sign in to follow this  
big_fish

caddis flies

Recommended Posts

when I was turning rocks in the creek the other day I found some caddis fly larva it was green with a black head about 1/2 in long does any one know what color the adult will be because after some investigation I maybe more lost now than when I started thanks by the way I live in eastern ohio and the stream is basicaly sand stone bottom big_fish dunno.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a Grannom. Colors can vary for the adult body can vary from green to dark gray. Wing colors can run the same from light tan to dark brown. Size is usually 12-14. Body usually makes up 40-60% of the bug's length. For example, if the length of the entire caddis including the wing is 10 mm. The body is usually 5 to 6 mm in length. Keep that in mind when you're tying patterns to match the hatch. A good easy to tie pattern is the CDC and Elk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brachycentrus (American Grannom) is a tube case maker, with an elongated 4 sided grey-black case.

 

More likely it was Rhyacophila (Green Sedge) They are the most common free living Caddis. The adults range up to 16mm in length, The wings are mottled shades of green and brown, the bodies are shades of olive (darker, early season, lighter as summer progresses.), Legs are various shades of brown.

 

Free living caddis larvae must have relatively fast moving, well oxygenated water, being the least advanced, they lack highly developed gills.

 

In most cases the Pupae will emerge in May or June, Adults may live for weeks. Adult dry imitations may be less effective than adult wets or emergers.

 

The pupae emerge from the larval habitat (riffles), rise to the surface quickly and break through the film to take flight almost immediately. Rises to emergers are violent splashes and often take fish airborn in the pursuit.

 

Egg-laying females crawl or dive to the bottom of riffle areas, paste eggs on the rocks and then simply let go and drift with the current until they reach the surface film and then break through slowly if at all, sometimes drifting for long distances, making a fine target for trout holding below riffle areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...