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Bill_729

Dusted off my fly rod

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It's not all about the species of fish but also what fly are you going to be chucking that determines the weight of the fly rod. I have 3,4,5,6 and 8 weight rods. My big small mouth flies I use an 8 wt. I don't fish small dry flies and nymphs for smallmouth so there is no other choice for me. I've tried them and frankly throwing big fluffy or weighted flies on a 5 or 6 wt sucks. Far less effort to throw them with an 8 wt. Those who say they are throwing poppers and big weighted flies on a 5 wt really aren't throwing big fluffy weighted flies. Lefty kreh, a very accomplished caster, used and recommends an 8 wt for river bass. I'm sure he can cast most anything on a 5 wt yet he chooses an 8 wt. I bet there's a very good reason for this choice. I might pick up a 7 wt soon for smaller stream bass.

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Thank you to everyone who provided me with advise and suggestions. Many of you quickly identified a gap between what I thought I wanted to buy and what I really need (to fish bass). I've picked up some good tips about fly fishing for bass. I'm looking forward to making some bigger flies. I've got an extra spool with some sinking line on it--I may take that off and put some WF-8-F on it (to try on my Wt-7 rod). I'm looking forward to trying some heavier leaders too since I feel confident that it will help to make my flies last longer (and those bass bugs represent a definite effort to tie!) The part of me that was interested in trying to fish a lighter weight rod is still present, but my perspective on it changed some. I wanted to think that you can catch big fish (bass) and small fish on a small fly, but apparently, that's not the best way to catch bass. It really more about the "journey" than the gear anyway, and I certainly consider this thread part of my journey. That said, there's nothing wrong with having nice gear if you enjoy it..

 

As a matter of coincidence, I went to Half-Priced books today, and while searching for fly-tying books (they didn't have any), I saw a copy of Robert Travers, "Trout Magic". I pulled it off the shelf and read the preamble, even though I already knew what it said. Those of you who don't know what it says, I'm not going to spoil it for you, you can look for it on your journey. Maybe someone has a link to the book, I don't know. So far, so one but me has "waxed poetic" in this thread-ha. It occurred to me that that some of you are probably meat-fisherman! : )

 

Cheers,

Bill_729

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I'm not a meat fisherman ... but I will keep some 'Gills and Crappie from time to time. On the other hand, I don't see fishing as some higher art form, either. It's fishing. No matter what gear you use, or what presentations you attempt, you're still trying to outsmart a creature with a primitive, instinct only brain.

Some are conditioned to avoid prey that acts a certain way. That makes them harder to catch. This is true of any species, and the more catch and release fish that survive, the more they learn to avoid. Bass are targeted with flies less than trout, and so are less wary of any of the presentations. You CAN catch bass on small flies ... but it's not necessary, since they'll take larger flies on thicker lines.

 

It's all about conditioning.

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"On the other hand, I don't see fishing as some higher art form, either. It's fishing."

 

I can't totally identify with Robert Travers' quote below, but it impressed me as possessing more truth than you find in most places. I think it's part of the human condition that we like to decorate the things we enjoy. Prior to the Internet, this, along with various magazines, was most of the "support" for fly fishing that I had. Like I wrote earlier, flies and fly tying, at least, represent inspiration, history and art and craftsmanship. I can admire it for that. Fish are beautiful creatures too. I have mixed feelings about hooking them until I am out there for a while getting skunked! ; ) For me, fishing is more about "meditation" than fish. YMMV. Between the two of us, you are the demonstrated "real" fisherman, so what can I say? I guess I can only say that I believe it's true that "we get from things what it is that we really want from them" (not to be confused with what we say or think we want from them). There are probably as many reasons to fish as there are people. Enjoy.

 

“I fish because I love to. Because I love the environs where trout are found, which are invariably beautiful, and hate the environs where crowds of people are found, which are invariably ugly. Because of all the television commercials, cocktail parties, and assorted social posturing I thus escape. Because in a world where most men seem to spend their lives doing what they hate, my fishing is at once an endless source of delight and an act of small rebellion. Because trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed, or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility, and endless patience. Because I suspect that men are going this way for the last time and I for one don't want to waste the trip. Because mercifully there are no telephones on trout waters. Because in the woods I can find solitude without loneliness. ... And finally, not because I regard fishing as being so terribly important, but because I suspect that so many of the other concerns of men are equally unimportant and not nearly so much fun.”
Robert Traver

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Mikechell wrote: "No matter what gear you use, or what presentations you attempt, you're still trying to outsmart a creature with a primitive, instinct only brain. Some are conditioned to avoid prey that acts a certain way."

 

 

I was browsing through the Orvis (clothing) catalog. I confess I'm not "dressing for success" out on the waterways. I think you may be onto their marketing strategy! : ) If you look carefully at the cover (I could not find a copy online), you can find some "subtle" messages like you might be able to find in an alcohol ad (such things always raise my hackles a bit).

 

Repeating what I wrote earlier though, there's nothing wrong with having nice gear if you enjoy it. I think awareness is a good thing too.

 

Cheers,

Bill_729

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Welcome Bill. In my opinion, you can't go wrong with Hook and Hackle. I have never seen customer service even close to them. They have unbelievable specials and right now, they have free shipping. I built a 5wt travel rod recently. $149.00 blank marked down to 44.50. Components cost me around 60 but you could get by with cheaper in some of their kits. Glad you got back into it.

 

I never read the "rod building" part of the catalog before today. It does a good job of explaining how to tie on the line guides. Certainly there are a few more details I would need to learn, but this might be part of a "fun winter project" (that's what I need, more projects--ha!).

 

What resource do you recommend for becoming familiar with the details (shaping a handle, ferrules, etc.)?

 

Cheers,

Bill_729

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All you could need to know for <$10 ... any of the Clemons books are good, probably before internet the "Fiberglass Rod Making" was the most common source for new rod builders .

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=dale+p+clemens&_sacat=0&LH_TitleDesc=0&_osacat=0&_odkw=dale+p+clemens++

 

https://www.rodbuilding.org/list.php?2

 

http://www.rodbuildingforum.com/

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Dale Clemons books are "okay" but I would suggest visiting the two websites listed above more than the books. His books were the bible of rod building back in the day, but so much has changed/advanced since then a lot of the info in his books is somewhat outdated. Not saying you won't learn from them, but just that you will find more relevant info online now than in his books these days.

 

If you get into building and have any questions just ask, happy to lend a hand.

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I don't disagree with that Steve, obviously his stuff is dated, fiberglass in the title says so, but without a foundation in a book or books, forums and video are pretty useless to me as a learning experience. If I was familiar with a modern book as well written and covering all the aspects, I'd have recommended it. Who is the Dale P Clemons of the 21st century? I might update my library.

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Who is the Dale P Clemons of the 21st century?

 

There's isn't really far as books go. Mainly because back then it took a bit of money and a publicist to become a well known knowledgeable builder, so that's why his book was so popular back then because there really weren't many other books/sources for info other than lesser known authors like Bill Stinson and a couple others that wrote smaller books on the subject. That's pretty much why I say the internet is the best source for info now. Because it gave a platform to builders that are just as knowledgeable as Clemons but gives them easy access to share that knowledge online.

 

I get what you are saying about why you like books. I'm kind'a the same way with some things. With rod building I liked the internet best when I first started many years ago, but with things like fly tying I always found books to be the better source of info for me for some reason, which is odd since I run this site laugh.png I'm kind'a weird that way though, some things I learn best from the internet, and other I learn best from books. No idea why that is.

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I'm one of those ... who reads books and can learn from them ... but give me internet videos any day !!! I know to look at more than one video. After watching a few on a technique, I know I'm able to pick up the basics.

There are, I know, people who don't know how to operate a screw driver ... and it might not be the same for them.

 

I don't like reading instructions online ... but I do like watching someone do the procedures. Worth a thousand books, I my opinion.

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tjm,

 

I tried to "like" your post above, but it said "you have reached your quota of positive votes for the day". (To Whom It May Concern) This seemed strange since I haven't "voted" for anything else. Thanks for the links!

 

Bill_729

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Welcome Bill. In my opinion, you can't go wrong with Hook and Hackle. I have never seen customer service even close to them. They have unbelievable specials and right now, they have free shipping. I built a 5wt travel rod recently. $149.00 blank marked down to 44.50. Components cost me around 60 but you could get by with cheaper in some of their kits. Glad you got back into it.

I never read the "rod building" part of the catalog before today. It does a good job of explaining how to tie on the line guides. Certainly there are a few more details I would need to learn, but this might be part of a "fun winter project" (that's what I need, more projects--ha!).

 

What resource do you recommend for becoming familiar with the details (shaping a handle, ferrules, etc.)?

 

Cheers,

Bill_729

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Bill, there are hundreds of YouTube videos on rod building. There are books as well. If you can find a class in your area, that would be better. With most rod building retailers, they sell kits with all the guides, thread, etc. Most include handle kits as well. Its fun and rewarding to shape your own from cork rings but after looking at what Steve (steeldrifter) can make, youll be humbled and inspired. As always, ask any questions you have. Lots of experience in here.

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