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SINK TIP vs Full Sink in River Fishing

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I've enjoyed using my full sink Mastery line in stillwaters and am interested in getting a sink tip for river fishing. I have been considering S.A. 's "Streamer Express" and the "Wet Tip Express".

Is anyone using either of these S.A Lines? I want to purchase a new line for stream fishing and don't quite understand the concept of the Streamer Express. It has an intermediate running line which sounds good for stillwaters or pounding the banks from a moving boat but obviously would not mend very well for nymphing or dead drifting. I love to fish streamers but perhaps my original interest in this line is misplaced and I would be better served by using the Wet Tip Express. Anyone with experience who can offer positive or negative feedback on these lines?

Do I even need a sink tip or would I be better off using my full sink even in the moving water?

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A full sinking line for creek and river fishing can be a miserable thing unless you use a shooting basket. Not too horrible from a boat or canoe, but lacks subtlety when compared with your abilities with a sink tip. Of course the exact recommendation is closely tied with river size, depth you need to fish, line weight and fly size.

 

Assuming smallmouth fishing on "average" creeks and small rivers, and assuming a 6 weight (my standard for this kind of fishing), I suggest a 10' Type V sink tip. You can get down to about 5' pretty easily and you have easier casting, mending and shooting. If you need more depth you can also carry a 3' section of Cortland LC13 and use that as an extra weighting system that can get you to 8' or more.

 

A Teeny 200 grain line is also a possibility though I find that best handled with my 8 wt - it depends on how fast your rod is and how much you like to load it.

 

An intermediate running line isn't as much of a handicap as you'd think. It runs very close to the surface so mends are still possible. I typically toss an intermediate when fishing Dahlberg Divers and other near-surface flies because I get better handling that with a typical floater. Of course the intermediate is at its best with 'down and across' swings and other techniques that fish the fly on a tight line for the full length of the cast.

 

My $0.02

 

Joe C.

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I'm sure it may be primitive, but I've just relied on heavier flies to get them down to 6' or less. I do fish the Ohio and Allegheny Rivers though, and a sink-tip is probably something I should consider.

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This isnt a gripe with a particulat sink tip but with all sink tips i have tried. They hinge where the floating line meets the sinking line. It screws up my casting stroke and generally just gets me frustrated. wallbash.gif

 

Are there any sink tips out there that cast like a floating line? dunno.gif

 

Why cant they design a sink tip to cast like a floater? dunno.gif ive_been_ripped.gif

 

At times a can toss a bass bug and nearly a full line(floating) but i put on a sink tip and it looks as if i never held a fly rod before. wallbash.gif

 

 

 

 

 

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Try a full Sinker. What are you looking to use the sink tip for. The great thing about a full sink line vs a sink-tip is that as you retrieve your fly it stays flat or aims downward in the water column, a natural movement for prey. A sink tip on the other hand tends to rise in the water column, not a natural movement for prey.

 

Plus the full sinker casts with out that hinge that haunts all the sink tips.

 

 

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I've had pretty good luck with Cortland's build your own sinking tippet kit (I don't remember what they call it exactly) It comes with 6 feet of lead core line and half a dozen shrink on loop connecters. I used the kit to build a 1 foot, a two foot, and a three foot sinking tippet. I only use them in exceptional conditions because I only fish floating lines here in New Mexico. So far I have used them successfully on the Green River, the San Juan River and the Rio Grande river. It takes a great deal of patience and effort to cast the three footer on a 5 weight.

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QUOTE (atroutbum2 @ Mar 15 2005, 02:12 PM)
Are there any sink tips out there that cast like a floating line? dunno.gif

Why cant they design a sink tip to cast like a floater? dunno.gif ive_been_ripped.gif

Sinking heads - 30 footers - are the real problem with sinking tips. That 30' head puts the transition right at the rod tip most of the time. Unless you have 2 or 3' inside the rod tip - or conversely 15' away from the rod tip - you'll have to deal with hinging. I've found my 10' Orvis sinktip (Wonderline - hell they all sink anyway so why not tongue.gif ) casts just fine. No hinging what-so-ever. The transition is less noticeable on this line (Type V) than it is on my ghost tip intermediate!

 

Regarding the use of sink tip vs full sinker - they are two different tools. I use the sink tip almost exclusively in creeks and rivers where I will high-stick (line length doesn't matter as the cast is seldom 20') or drift and retrieve streamers. The slow retrieve (essentially keeping a tight line) works with the current in some subtle ways with a sink-tip.

 

Joe C.

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