Jump to content
Fly Tying
Sign in to follow this  
bass master

Rod Storage

Recommended Posts

A different topic that I cant find an answer to. Where does everyone store their rods at. For people who live in a 55+ community in Florida. We have car ports with a shed. There are no garages or basements. In the summer it gets hot. And so does my shed. I would say it gets around 100+ degrees inside sometimes. Right now I have been keeping my good stuff under a bed. Its ok, Just a hassle getting in and out. And I keep everything else in the shed. Not my fly tying stuff. Old rods, Bass rods, kids rods, extra rods, tackle boxes and stuff we all have. I would like to attach everything neatly to the wall instead of leaning them in the corner, or under a bed. Now will the heat matter? The rods in there now seen fine. But just leery of my good rods. They were not all that expensive to say they are. But still. I am just dealing with heat, No sun light at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fortunately, I own my own house and have a room set aside for my fishing and hunting equipment. I have a rod rack where I store my rods. It also has space to store my tackle boxes and reels. As far as heat goes, when I was fishing more I always used to carry a rod in the back. I don't think the heat will impact the rods that much. The impact would be more on the lines and what you're storing in your tackle boxes. Soft plastics and rubber legs, don't handle heat well in my experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now my rods are stored in their respective rod tubes and in a closet in my tying room

 

During fishing season I carry just one rod in the back of the car. Heat has never affected it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steeldrifter (site admin. and pro rod builder) is probably best qualified to answer this question, but I've built a fair few myself so I'll give you my two cents. In two words: I wouldn't. The graphite rod blanks will probably be okay--probably--in 100+ heat, but the epoxy finish on the guide wraps could start to soften at that temperature, and certainly the glue that most rod companies use to attach tip-top guides will do so. Philly is quite right, too, in saying that fly lines definitely won't like that much heat over a sustained period of time -- maybe if they're the ones made for tropical temperatures, but I don't own any of those, so I can't say for sure. I wouldn't leave a rod, reel, or line of mine in a shed that was going to see temps approaching 100 degrees.

 

Somebody is sure to come on here and say the opposite of what I just told you, and that's fine, but I say again: I wouldn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally disagree with Bryon, Just kidding, I agree with him. I would defer to Steve or Silver, he knows a lot about sciencey stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I leave my rods right inside the garage door when they're not in my vehicle. The garage gets too hot to go into in the afternoon, when the sun is shining on the roll up door. The vehicle, when the rods in are in there, probably reaches 120 degrees in the Florida sun.

I've been doing this since 2002. All of my rods and lines work just fine, with no signs of melting or stickiness, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heat will not make the epoxy turn soft and gooey. It will eventually break it down and make it brittle. How this applys to a fishing rod I have no idea. I do have experience with leaving my golf clubs in the trunk of my car all summer. I stopped this practice after my club heads started to separate from the shaft and go flying. After about the 4th club head separation I inquired at the pro shop and the first thing they asked was if I leave my clubs in the car. I was told that the prolonged heat would weaken the epoxy and would eventually fail. Which is what was happening. It was no big deal since 5 minute epoxy is what holds club heads to shaft so it was a simple matter to gather the club head and re-affix it to the shaft. Since stopping the practice of leaving clubs in the car, I have not experienced another club head separating from the shaft in the last 10 or 15 years.

 

Again, I have no idea how this effects a fishing rod since there are a different set of forces at work on a fishing rod and the level of force pales in comparrision to the force exerted on a golf club.

 

The moral of my story is that it cannot possibly be good for a fishing rod to be left in super heated conditions for extended periods of time. I can't say I've ever had any rod failures due to heat and the experts may say otherwise but I personally will never leave my fishing rods or golf clubs where they would be exposed to abnormally high heat for extended periods of time.

 

My rods are stored in racks secured to the rafters across my basement ceiling. I have the ability to store, I'm guessing, 40 assembled rods and reels there. This includes long fly rods and surf rods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My graphite rods stay in their tubes in my garage in MS, in the heat. Same with rubber legged flies, soft plastics, etc. No problems, so far, after 10 years.

 

I keep my Bamboo in the house.

 

Now, you are worrying me.

 

I would love to have seen the golf club head launch! I bet that scattered your friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, if you work outside in the mid-south (and I'd guess the south) you will have worked many days in temperatures at or over a hundred F. There have been weeks here in the past when even night time temps were at or near a 100F, so anything designed to be used out of doors is very likely safe at 110F or so anr I'd guess much higher.I recall as a kid afternoon temps in Idaho of over 107F in the shade. I have actually gone fishing on days when it was about a hundred.

The interior of a car or the trunk of a car can reach 140F-200F if parked in the sun and I think it possible that a metal shed could get 20F over the ambient temperature.

200F inside a car is maybe hot enough to worry about; but rods and lines seem to survive many exposures. to trunks at summer temps so maybe not.

 

I found this on line at bassresource.com:

 

Per Jason Bruner, blank designer for St Croix rods (this was in RodMaker magazine last issue), regarding rod storage:

"...keep rods in areas that are well under the 180 degree (F) range and don't leave rods subjected to severe deflection for long periods."

 

Anyhow I keep the rods in homemade PVC tubes in either the shed or the car trunk, been doing this for about 50 years and and have not noticed any ill effects. I did have the hot glue of a tiptop get soft when I left the rod in a back window in the sun, and I saw that happen to another guy's metal ferrules.

You'll be more apt to incur damage by leaning the rods up against a wall or hanging them ona wall in such a way that they can deform. Or by exposing it to UV rays.

I think if you can stand the temperatures with out expiring the rods will be safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont have any $1,000 rod and reel set ups. My stuff is to use and fish with, Not to look at. But, Its nice stuff. I feel if i store them straight it should be fine. The extra rods I keep in there for someone that comes over or kids that feel like fishing are fine? I am still skeptical on doing this. I can crack the door and window open for a cross breeze. I do miss my garage and space up north I will tell you that! But this is the only logical space I can use and keep all my stuff in one place. As with the golf clubs coming apart. That glue is not permanent. Some glues you can heat up with a heat gun to soften and remove. Now I not a rod builder. But is that not an epoxy. Once it hardens its done. All the crap thats in the shed seems fine. There is no exploded cans of spray paint or some type of melted gue on the floor. Appreciate all the input. Most of my neighbors and friends are golfers. So asking them is like asking my wife.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Graphite rods are normally fine being stored just about anywhere unless is it in a totally enclosed place that see's extreme heat every day. Even in some of the warmer places like Fl or Tx there's not much to worry about for the most part. The guide finish epoxy does actually soften with heat. That is actually how you redo a rod is to pass a lighter under the wraps to soften the finish so you can cut into it and peel it off. But the heat required to soften the finish is not something that you will probably exp just from being in a shed in the sunlight. It would usually take an external heat source greater than that to soften the finish. So for the most part graphite rods can be stored just about anywhere (out of the sun's UV rays) and you won't have to worry about them.

 

The exception to that are bamboo rods. A bamboo rod will take a "set" if it is in heat and is not stored flat in a tube.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Putting some ridged foam insulation with the radiant barrier on the walls and ceiling of your shed would help keep the temps down even a radiant barrier alone will make a big difference, I put radiant barrier sheeting on my roof a few years back, it made a bigger difference than going from r13 to r38 insulation in the summer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stand the tubes vertically, along the wall in a closet. Just line the closet wall(s) with your best rods. That way you have an environment that is the same as your house and it really doesn't take up much room..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Graphite rods should be fine in the heat

 

A different topic that I cant find an answer to. Where does everyone store their rods at. For people who live in a 55+ community in Florida. We have car ports with a shed. There are no garages or basements. In the summer it gets hot. And so does my shed. I would say it gets around 100+ degrees inside sometimes. Right now I have been keeping my good stuff under a bed. Its ok, Just a hassle getting in and out. And I keep everything else in the shed. Not my fly tying stuff. Old rods, Bass rods, kids rods, extra rods, tackle boxes and stuff we all have. I would like to attach everything neatly to the wall instead of leaning them in the corner, or under a bed. Now will the heat matter? The rods in there now seen fine. But just leery of my good rods. They were not all that expensive to say they are. But still. I am just dealing with heat, No sun light at all.

 

Graphite rods should be stored unassembled and stored in a protective rod tube. The tube can even be cardboard. They are resistant to heat so can be stored in the shed if you have to.

 

Reels with standard "cold water" fly lines need to be stored in a "temperate" area of the house, eg at what would be a comfortable room temperature. I assume house is air conditioned so store in the home. Tropical fly lines are more heat tolerant but I still would not routinely store them at temps >100 degrees. Best to be safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...