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flytire

anybody wearing a buff to the stores?

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The masks work by restricting spread from the wearer. If everyone wore one and then was meticulous with hand hygiene it would cut down cases a lot. But you can't take it off then touch your worktop and dog and door handle etc. You need to wash hands, remove and wash at over 60 deg or bin it and then wash hands again. Then take a bleach solution and wipe everything you've touched from the car to the house. 

If you wipe surfaces with bleach or 70% alcohol they should appear wet for 4mins to know you've killed anything on there 

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i wore my buff and had latex gloves on as i helped direct traffic and hand out palms  in the street  by our church.  drive up service.glad to see most older parishoners wore masks in their cars.    the police stopped another larger church from doing the same.

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denduke, I tuned out when buddy suggested that the essential oils offered "anti-bacterial properties?" or some such.  Home made and even purpose designed masks can cause more problems if not worn properly.  Constant adjusting is just unnecessarily touching your face.  I believe a mask will lessen transmission from the asymptomatic carriers wearing them.  A good thing.  As a form of self-protection, do not rely on that alone.  Keep your distance and don't raise your hands above your shoulders until you wash them.

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I read in an article yesterday that spandex,which a lot of buffs are made of ,are not a good fabric to rely on. The article said that any material that stretches is a bad choice since, when the material stretches, the "pores" in the material expand.

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Seems they are better than nothing since Wal-Mart & Home Depot erected the cattle grates for entrance. Had 112 in stock at work & sold all in less than 3 days, where a lady called with 75 employees & asked if there were any for sale. Had 31. She called back 5 minutes later & only 29 so said she'd take all. Might get more tomorrow.....& might have to buy a couple more to last another couple months, even if they don't quite fit right.... 

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Personally I am not wearing it. One thing is I am trying to limit myself to only one trip out a week to get some groceries and do anything else I have to do. Other is I personally do not see a need for a mask to prevent it. This is not actually air borne, it is at most, the droplets in your "spit" for lack of a better term. So simply don't sneeze/cough or talk close to anyone at the store. Don't really need a mask to do that, imo that is just common sense, just keep your mouth closed and it accomplishes the same thing. Maybe we could mandate a "keep your mouth shut in public" law after this is over, I'd rather enjoy that lol

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1 hour ago, Steeldrifter said:

This is not actually air borne, it is at most, the droplets in your "spit" for lack of a better term. 

so how do "spit" droplets get from one place to another or one person to another person if its not actually "air borne"?

arent the masks the medical professionals using to protect themselves from air borne particles

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1 hour ago, Steeldrifter said:

Personally I am not wearing it.

What's the harm in wearing it? What if you have it and don't know? You (or anyone you're in contact with at the grocery store) ever had the flu? 

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19 minutes ago, flytire said:

so how do "spit" droplets get from one place to another or one person to another person if its not actually "air borne"?

arent the masks the medical professionals using to protect themselves from air borne particles

It's from droplets spraying out during speech, not actually hanging in the air which is what air borne illness means.

15 minutes ago, chugbug27 said:

What's the harm in wearing it? What if you have it and don't know? You (or anyone you're in contact with at the grocery store) ever had the flu? 

No "harm" but also not needed as long as I said keeping your/my mouth closed accomplishes the exact same thing. Truth of the matter is as per most research/articles all basically say the same thing. If its an n95 resp type mask that does help, but those are supposed to be left for med people. A typical surgical/dust mask being lose fitting and thin does not offer much help for the most part. So again, just keep mouth closed and that accomplishes the main goal.

If someone feels they want to wear a mask, more power to them by all means do it.

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Everyone in an operating room is masked, covered hair, etc. to protect the patient.  They don't wear all that stuff to protect themselves, it's to keep them from dripping, exhaling, dropping or otherwise exuding pathogens into patient's incisions.

The only thing a surgeons is wearing to protect themselves, these days, is if they have a face shield on.

Of course, the coverings offer some protection from a patient spewing blood ... but that's not why they're worn.

Wearing a regular cloth mask, as was the original question of this thread, is to prevent the wearer from infecting others.  If you KNOW you don't have a disease, there's really no need to wear a mask.  If there's ANY possibility you've been infected, you should have the mask on any time you're close to other people.

BUT ... with the already wide spread nature of COVID-19 ... we all have to face the possibility that one of three realities is going to be true.

You either:  HAD it ... you HAVE it ... or you're going to CATCH it.  It's not going away any time soon and we can't afford to "shelter in place" forever.

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As to effectiveness of surgical masks and other protective gear during surgery, that is probably a conversation I will not get involved in as I am someone whom lost my 51 yr old Sister exactly 11 months ago due to an  infection she got during surgery. So probably best if I bow out of this conversation now as  I have very personal and strong opinions on some aspects of this subject. I will let Mike monitor this thread from here forward.

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13 minutes ago, mikechell said:

 

 

13 minutes ago, mikechell said:

we can't afford to "shelter in place" forever.

Day at a time, dude, day at a time. 

 

22 minutes ago, mikechell said:

one of three realities is going to be true.

I do think there's a fourth reality, which is not getting it and not giving it to anyone else. It may look and feel weird, but I'm wearing a mask. 

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Quote

This is not actually air borne, it is at most, the droplets in your "spit" for lack of a better term.

The droplets are or can be  airborne for up three hours according to National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-study-idUSKBN2143QP

Quote

The tests show that when the virus is carried by the droplets released when someone coughs or sneezes, it remains viable, or able to still infect people, in aerosols for at least three hours.

On plastic and stainless steel, viable virus could be detected after three days. On cardboard, the virus was not viable after 24 hours. On copper, it took 4 hours for the virus to become inactivated.

N95, N100 respirators are primarily for wearer protection and required PPE  in many dust producing jobs other than medical, one I'm familiar with is various dust producing construction tasks, or cleaning mold and another is automobile paint shop work; otoh, surgical masks are for patient protection and if the N95 is used in that capacity it also provides patient protection. Most N95 are manufactured to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) standards rather than FDA. N95 stops 95% of airborne  particles but  in the common disposable form a bit hard to get  a perfect fit, won't fit with facial hair. I believe the testing uses 0.3 micron particles, smaller than the holes in a piece of cloth.  There is a medical version of the N95,  N95s regulated by FDA, also for wearer protection.

From my viewpoint, the chances are that any homemade or surgical type will only provide the wearer minimum protection if any simply because the holes/pores are so large. Unless soaking it in something might help? 19th century surgeons soaked masks in vinegar, I think, but that may have been to combat the stench? Cloth masks are more for other peoples protection as they catch and contain our spit. If 100% of people wore a buff I have no doubt that germ transmission would be reduced. 

"The CDC recommends that all people wear cloth face masks in public places where it’s difficult to maintain a 6-foot distance from others. This will help slow the spread of the virus from people without symptoms or people who do not know they have contracted the virus. Cloth face masks should be worn while continuing to practice social distancing. "

 

 

 

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It probably won't matter, Chug.  If you encounter the infected, you'll likely catch it.  Your mask doesn't protect you from virus particles in the air, any more than the filters on your car's air system keeps all the dust out of your car.  Eventually, something gets past. 

One of the amazing things about viruses (if you only think objectively) they aren't truly alive.  They cannot reproduce ... one of the qualifiers of "life".  They get a host cell to produce copies of themselves.  Since they aren't alive, they can't really die.  They can, eventually, deteriorate and become inert.  They might even become non-viable and "die."  But before that happens, if they find a host cell, they can cause it to make copies.  Hypothetical situation:  You go to the store to buy necessary groceries.  When you get home and unpack those groceries, your cloths brush against a kitchen towel.  Somebody dries there hands and shakes the towel out and boom, the virus particle is now suspended for a few seconds.  Long enough to come in contact with a host cell ... aaand ... you're infected.

You can delay the inevitable ... but it IS inevitable.  I, personally, don't know ANYONE who has never caught a cold, at least once.  This virus is, quite possibly, going to be with us for a very long time.

 As with Steve's very unfortunate loss ... there are no "perfect" safe guards.

I'm not trying to argue, just stating facts (I've done some research) ... and opinions (mine and other's) ... as I see them.  Oh, and I've done the research because my job is considered "essential".  I still drive to and from work (47 miles each way) every day.

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