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May Flies From the Vise

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4 hours ago, mikechell said:

TIER ... that's actually a pretty good picture!  Looks like an effective jig pattern, too.

 Thank you for the complement about the picture! It was a good pattern because a lot of fish hit it, but then I lost it. 🤦‍♂️

That was sad.

Well at least I got a video of me tying it.

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Here's a tip I had to learn the hard way... Whenever you come up with something new or maybe just a bit different... Tie up more than one and leave the best one on your bench - don't fish it... If the pattern works you'll then have a "master" to make another one (or a hundred of them if you're tying for shops...).  As a commercial tyer I learned the great value of having master patterns that I carefully retained over the years... That way I could always make another (and get dimensions, materials, and colors to match exactly - even if a second order came ten years later....).

With a master pattern there on the bench in front of you, the tying process not only becomes easier - but much quicker as well since each it's a simple matter to trim materials to the exact dimensions with that master to compare to... All these years later I actually have boxes of master patterns.

 

Pure frustration when something you tied up casually - works so well that you want a bunch of them - but you're only tying from memory... Been down that road myself on more than one occasion... 

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I ordered some boxes to hold my thread and they arrived yesterday. In each box was a spool of black Veevus 12/0 and a spool of Veevus light olive body quill. I have never used the body quill so I decided to do some experimenting. The first fly is tied on a size 14 scud hook, has a florescent yellow sparkle emerger yarn shuck, a body of the body quill coated in Loon UV Flow and yellow grizzly hackle (from a woolly bugger pack) tied paraloop style. The second fly has identical materials - except the hackle is done crazy collar style (see here: https://www.flytyer.com/crazy-collars/ ).

Green Emerger Paraloop.jpg

Green Emerger Crazy Wing.jpg

Edited by TSMcDougald
Correct typos

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30 minutes ago, Landon P said:

That's a cute little popper 😂 I like it 

Thanks! I was going for cute.😁

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9 minutes ago, Landon P said:

The big eyes remind me of little Nemo 🥺

He’d probably be a tasty Bass bait...

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1784138162_SwannundazeSedge.thumb.JPG.78bcde5fbf844deea12da148b31ee36f.JPG

 

Swannundaze Sedge

Hook: Curved Caddis, Size 12

Thread: Yellow, 70D

Underbody: Red floss

Body: Olive Scud Back (substituted for amber swannundaze)

Rib: Peacock Herl

Thorax: Tan dubbing

Wing Case and Horns: Pheasant Tail

Hackle: Speckled Indian Hen

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1 hour ago, Julius Riffle said:

1784138162_SwannundazeSedge.thumb.JPG.78bcde5fbf844deea12da148b31ee36f.JPG

 

Swannundaze Sedge

Hook: Curved Caddis, Size 12

Thread: Yellow, 70D

Underbody: Red floss

Body: Olive Scud Back (substituted for amber swannundaze)

Rib: Peacock Herl

Thorax: Tan dubbing

Wing Case and Horns: Pheasant Tail

Hackle: Speckled Indian Hen

That looks like a brook trout killer!

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2 hours ago, Julius Riffle said:

 

Swannundaze Sedge

Hook: Curved Caddis, Size 12

Thread: Yellow, 70D

Underbody: Red floss

Body: Olive Scud Back (substituted for amber swannundaze)

Rib: Peacock Herl

Thorax: Tan dubbing

Wing Case and Horns: Pheasant Tail

Hackle: Speckled Indian Hen

That is a nice looking fly!

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21 hours ago, Capt Bob LeMay said:

Here's a tip I had to learn the hard way... Whenever you come up with something new or maybe just a bit different... Tie up more than one and leave the best one on your bench - don't fish it... If the pattern works you'll then have a "master" to make another one (or a hundred of them if you're tying for shops...).  As a commercial tyer I learned the great value of having master patterns that I carefully retained over the years... That way I could always make another (and get dimensions, materials, and colors to match exactly - even if a second order came ten years later....).

With a master pattern there on the bench in front of you, the tying process not only becomes easier - but much quicker as well since each it's a simple matter to trim materials to the exact dimensions with that master to compare to... All these years later I actually have boxes of master patterns.

 

Pure frustration when something you tied up casually - works so well that you want a bunch of them - but you're only tying from memory... Been down that road myself on more than one occasion... 

This is great advice, Capt, especially for a new tier.  When I first started, I never did that, and would lose a producing fly and have no record of it and not remember what pattern it was. So I started taking a photo of each new pattern I tied on, then of course I would forget the name of the pattern and recipe. So I started a spreadsheet with pattern names, recipes, and photos of the flies I tied. Having a 'hard copy' is an even better idea. 

 

BTW, great flies everybody, keep them coming. 

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