Jump to content
Fly Tying

Recommended Posts

Hi Guys,

What type/materials of fly body dubbing tends to be the most hydrophobic (resistance to water logging)?

TIA!

G

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

synthetics for the most part do not absorb water and are easier to dry out.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Polypropylene not Polyester is not only water resistant it has a positive buoyancy. Check out Fly-Rite Company.

48-colors

I used to use the 48-color packet for most of my dries.  However, I've found most any dubbing will float if you treat it with Gink - even wool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wapsi superfine is another polypropylene dubbing, and you can buy a 12 color box for about $1 a color retail.

On the natural side beaver also does the job you're looking to accomplish, again about $1 a color. Not sure what's "the most" hydrophobic, though.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, chugbug27 said:

Not sure what's "the most" hydrophobic, though.

 

Thinking it is that stuff ya use on them “flying fish” patterns that won’t even land on water, before getting ate up.... 

😎😎🎣🎣✌️✌️

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fly tyers dungeon, has a nice floating dubbing I really like all their stuff is synthetic so it won't take up much water no matter which you choose, his pricing is good too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/20/2020 at 8:04 AM, Gundriver64 said:

Hi Guys,

What type/materials of fly body dubbing tends to be the most hydrophobic (resistance to water logging)?

TIA!

G

 

The definition of hydrophobic is that the material actively repels water and will not mix with water.

Chemically, water is a polar molecule with a weakly positive and weakly negative side. Hydrocarbons are non-polar molecules. Hence water and oil do not mix. So oil is hydrophobic.

Synthetic materials can be hydrophobic BUT the degree that they are hydrophobic is not great. For example, polypropylene is hydrophobic BUT wear a shirt made of polypropylene yarn and you will get wet.

If synthetics like polypropylene were hydrophobic like oil, you would not need to put a floatant on flies tied with synthetic dubbing. So there is no synthetic dubbing material that I know of that is "hydrophobic" to the degree that the dry fly dubbed with ist does not also require a coating of floatant.

Natural fur like beaver and muskrat ON THE ANIMAL is hydrophobic because the water animal furs are coated in oil. However, when the fur is processed for dubbing or the hide is tanned, these oils are removed and the dubbing is no longer hydrophobic because the hydrophobic oil coating has been removed.

Natural fur is made of the protein keratin and keratin is hydrophobic as well. So whether you dub with beaver, muskrat or polypropylene dubbing; I doubt that one is hydrophobic to the extent that you would notice any difference between them, at least I haven't.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to go au natural, you must Leave it to Beaver.  A back cast will generally dry out any dry fly for the short float I'm going to encounter...7-10 feet?  before I get drag, even with mending.  (I'm a lousy fisherman.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, SilverCreek said:

Chemically, water is a polar molecule with a weakly positive and weakly negative side. Hydrocarbons are non-polar molecules. Hence water and oil do not mix. So oil is hydrophobic.

So ... dip all your flies in motor oil!  😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mikechell said:

So ... dip all your flies in motor oil!  😉

You don't? 10/30 for the winning float!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/20/2020 at 11:35 AM, rotaryflytyingdotcom said:

Polypropylene not Polyester is not only water resistant it has a positive buoyancy. Check out Fly-Rite Company.

48-colors

I used to use the 48-color packet for most of my dries.  However, I've found most any dubbing will float if you treat it with Gink - even wool.

I have miles of natural color polypropylene carpet yarn. Makes great wings and bodies. Floats like a cork and doesn't absorb water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...