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Landon P

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Does this fly look ok to sell as a hex pattern? Had someone who wanted some and I very never done them below. Give me the truth below 

20200603_144007.jpg

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In my opinion ... Looks perfect for fishing.  Way too irregular (amateurish) to ask money for.

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Hi the body needs to taper from the middle of the hook to the tail it might be better to clamp a needle in your vice make a tapered tail and body this way see Oliver Edwards Mohican floating may fly also if you can borrow or buy a copy of Oliver Edwards  A Fly Tiers Master class an excellent book you will learn a lot from this as I have Oliver is a realistic fly tier hope this is helpful to you hope you are well and staying safe in these difficult times always remember when tying difficult flies hurry slowly happy tying

Kind regards Steve 😉 

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Yep, that's about right. Good fly, just practice with it till proportions are right. That fly is called a Haystack. Usually Haystacks are tied with a dubbed body but the Haystack name refers to the wing and tail, not the body, so that fly you tied is still a Haystack.

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$.02 Couple of things.  As Steve says  can use needle or bodkin in vise to start the bodies and advance your thread then fold down the foam each segment then no thread showing, in harms way between segments.  Pull needle/bodkin transfer to hook.  This was stonefly so 2 biots for tail, the gray one.  Yours a bit different but same deal.   Hope this helps

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Look up SBPatt's "Carnage" flies (in the SBS forum) for a way to do excellent foam, tapered abdomens.

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4 hours ago, Landon P said:

Does this fly look ok to sell as a hex pattern? Had someone who wanted some and I very never done them below. Give me the truth below 

20200603_144007.jpg

There is no indication of how large the fly is but I would not use that fly. It has too thick a body and does not look long enough for a hex.

The best Hex pattern I know of is John Nebels "Flex Hex." It solves the problem of flies that are true to size for the natural, being too large for the fish to eat because the flies are too stiff. The real hex mayflies are MAYFLIES. They may be big but they still are fragile and even an 8 inch trout can cripple and eat a real Hex. Even with the extended body, you can have hits on the fly that don't hook the fish.

Photo of a Hexagenia Limbata Dun

YZIRCZ7RHHHZ1LXZOLZZOLLZWLSRPLJLWLZZELYL

Spinner

146336706_db8147b23a_o.jpg

The Flex Hex is the best pattern for this hatch that I have been able to find and I've tried a number of them from traditional patterns tied on straight hooks to extended body patterns tied on shorter hooks. Both have problems hooking up on all takes.

The problem is that the naturals are so huge that "stiff" patterns are often pushed out of the way on strike. Unlike the natural which folds up, the stiff tail and body of traditional patterns do not and the fly just gets pushed out of the way unless it is a perfect take.

John Nebels "Flex Hex" solves the problem of flies that are true to size for the natural, being too large for the fish to eat because the flies are too stiff. The Flex Hex solves this problem by putting a mono to mono loop hinge in the middle of the pattern and even smaller fish can take in this pattern. It actually fold ups and offers less resistance than the natural.

Here is the Pattern:

https://globalflyfisher.com/patterns/the-flex-hex

Write up on the pattern.

https://globalflyfisher.com/patterns/doing-the-limbata

 

Here is how I tie the pattern. It is both a dun and spinner pattern as I explain below so "two birds with one stone" type of fly.

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I've modified my version of the Flex Hex pattern to a parachute which produces a more realistic impression on the water and can easily be changed into a spinner by cutting off the post. The naturals have a mottled brown body with a yellow abdomen and the cross hatched brown thread on yellow mimics this.

Parachutes are best tied with one size longer hackle than the traditional hackled flies and getting hackle that is long enough for a flex hex is difficult. Modern genetic capes have longer feathers with denser hackle but the hackle length is shorter. I use my old Metz necks from the 1980s for the size 2 hackle that I use for this pattern.

So don't throw your old necks away. Modern necks are better for almost all patterns but some large flies like Flex Hexs and the Borger Blue Damsel can be tied with the longer less dense fibers of older necks.

John Nebel's Flex Hex solves that problem.

Here is John Nebel's Original Flex Hex Pattern:

https://globalflyfisher.com/patterns/the-flex-hex

Write up on the pattern.

https://globalflyfisher.com/patterns/doing-the-limbata

 

 

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Here's another style.  I use the same process as Steve and denduke, using a needle to make the segmented body.  First one is an Eastern Green Drake and I the second was a Hex for a lake in Northern Ontario.   

 

 

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Landon, I would not buy that fly either not jumping on a band wagon, but it is easier to tie for fish than fisherman. you need to develop a tapered body that you can consistently repeat develop a base pattern and record your material, measurements, and keep a master copy of the fly on file. Foam body's can be prepared in advance and stored by size and color. The photos are just a example but I can and you need to be able to reproduce your pattern consistently by the dozens and then again six months from now when someone asks for a dozen or one and expects the same fly they bought in the past. I need to refill this bin :)

salmonbody.jpg

salmonfly1.jpg

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7 hours ago, flytire said:

 

Van Houten's technique appears dangerous. I wonder how he finds the needle when he's done... and many unplanned piercings he is responsible for. 

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I don't know if it was that video, or some other, but several years back, I tied some bodies on a needle like that.  Made a couple pretty flies and went out to fish them.  They got hit ... once.  The fish pulled those tails apart on the very first tug, both flies.  Maybe trout hit differently, but for sunfish, those tail/abdomens were just too much trouble for one hit flies.

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