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denduke

Drop shot fly

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I notice that he suggests a stop knot below the split shot. I don't do that because if the shot gets hung up, I can pull it free and loose only the shot.

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The article should give credit to Larry Tullis when they feature a technique that clearly has an original source that is well documented in fly fishing literature.

The original name was "bounce nymphing." I can't say for sure who first tried this technique for fly fishing, but I can say that Larry Tullis was the first one to publish it back in 2001. So I prefer to call it "bounce nymphing."

https://www.flyfishingtraditions.com/bounce-nymphing/

This technique was introduced by Larry Tullis his 2001 book Nymphing Strategies.

https://www.amazon.com/Nymphing-Strategies-Larry-Tullis-2001-12-01/dp/B01FKTMHXI

The term "drop shotting" is in reference to a technique that bass fishers use to flip heavy rigs into spots like the ones in the Bassmaster article below.

https://m.bassmaster.com/tips/5-must-know-drop-shot-tactics

 

 

 

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I notice that he suggests a stop knot below the split shot. I don't do that because if the shot gets hung up, I can pull it free and loose only the shot.

I use the stop knot and 6x or 7x for the shot dropper if I am using 4x or 5x tippet for my nymphs. If the shot hangs then the lighter tippet will break and the knot keeps the shot from sliding off.

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True drop-shot rigs for bass use a pretty heavy weight.  The idea is to keep the lure in the strike zone by playing it against the weight, without moving the weight.  One of the best methods I used, was to have a rubber band on the weight.  This allowed more movement to the lure, again, without moving the weight.  I gave up the system because catching a fish always ended with a tangle of line, weight, hook and fish.

Many, many years ago ... I'm pretty sure it was in the 80's or 90's.  I recall reading an article about using a Bluegill colored streamer on a drop-shot rig for bedding bass.  The objective was to cast past the bed and reel in to bring the streamer over the bed.  You could then slack up, and the streamer would nose dive into the bed.  Slightly tighten up, without moving the weight and the streamer would dart back up.  It looked like a small Bluegill dipping down to eat some eggs then rising up to look for danger.

Never tried it ... but it seemed like a deadly technique.  It's why I tried drop-shotting in the first place, just wasn't doing flies back then.

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