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Fly Tying
DarrellP

Anybody stillwater trout fish?

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Good question Darrell.  I don’t, probably because I live near good flowing trout water, but I’d be interested in hearing responses also.

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That’s most of the trout fishing I do. Closest stream is about four hours away from me so I get to fish throughout the winter in local ponds stocked by the conservation department. Early season stockers are pretty dumb and can be caught on just about anything. I like biggish foam flies like hippie stompers or Chernobyl ants, maybe with a woolly bugger or some other dropper early on. December through early March I have the best luck on microjigs and midge larva and pupa patterns fished static under an indicator. Warm days any time during the season are fun with wet flies. Winged wets, soft hackles, and bumbles stripped through the shallows is a lot of fun.

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No still water around here, just streams, rivers and tailwaters. I have read stories about fishing the mountain lakes out West. Long leaders and tippets are the rule plus a low profile. From what the stories indicate, fishing still water is difficult due to visibility of the fish and spooky due to predators from air and the shoreline.

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Around here there are some lakes that are stocked with trout, but I fish the local streams.  The only time of done any lake fishing is up in Vermont but it's more if I see a cruising trout within casting range and have the right fly on.  I've only caught a couple of trout and the nicest one took a foam pan fish bug.  You can see the bug hanging out of the bluegill's mouth.  I caught the trout on it about a half hour later.  Thought I had a decent bass on.

 

bluegill-VT.jpg

Rainbow Trout_VT.jpg

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It's fairly simple, all you have to do for trout is use dry flies, and sometime a nymph under the dry. When it's raining a like to use small streamers. In clear water use black and olive and in brown water use white. In blue, of course us chartreuse 

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I assume, and that might be a problem, that still water stockers (or lake-bound) are different from still water wild fish (lake fish that have outlets, stocked or not) We have a lot of the former and not a lot of the latter. We fish them with the normal dries ( mosquitoes, gnats, terrestrials) when they are hitting dries. For wets we use scuds, nymphs, and caddis.

Again, assuming you're not talking about Lake Trout.

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Like any place you fish it's best to learn what hatches occur in the lake.  The two California lakes I fish are primarily callibaetis and midge lakes.  One can be fished with a callibaetis nymph/zebra midge combination under an indicator.  There is an ant hatch (size 12) in late May and June so having a floating ant pattern is recommended.  For streamers, woolly buggers and leech patterns are effective.  The other lake has callibaetis but the midges are blood midges.  So a callibaetis nymph/red blood midge combination works well.  There are also a lot of snails so a snail pattern can replace the blood midge.  For streamers, woolly buggers work well.  Denny Rickards is a still water author who ties many useful still water patterns; he has written several books and produced a couple of videos. 

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