Jump to content
Fly Tying
Sign in to follow this  
Capt Bob LeMay

Bendback patterns - notes on the Prince of Tides

Recommended Posts

In a conversation with a forum member I went over some of the things about bendback patterns I thought important.  Here's an excerpt from that conversation.  Hope it helps any tyers looking to explore these kinds of patterns... 

 

As far as that Prince of Tides... it was originated by Flip Pallot and my own version of his pattern varies a bit from the original (which, in fact, I've never seen a sample of....).  Mine starts with a Mustad 34007 hook in size 1/0 that's been hand-bent into shape.  The biggest complaint I've had with any commecially available bendback style hooks is that they're usually bent too much.. Here are a few different bent pattern photos that might show what I'm referring to - all are on 1/0 hooks with the exception of the last one meant for bonefish.... 

H1oZMwC.jpg

My own Big Eye Bendback (one of my royalty patterns with Umpqua - until they didn't sell well enough).  This is only one of the three colors it was done in... 

o2tBd7w.jpg

my own version of the Prince of Tides, more about it in a moment

Wvwrxsl.jpg

my own version of Chico Fernandez's Snapping Shrimp pattern, with black bear wing for the dark version and cinnamon phase bear for the lighter version - these are on #4 hooks and come with an "outrigger style" weedguard.... Once again I bend my own hooks - commercially available bent hooks just don't work well at all... 

Here the recipe for that Prince of Tides...

Hook:     Mustad 34007, 1/0 bent slightly less than 1/4" to the rear of the hook eye (using two pairs of pliers...).

Thread:  Danville's flat waxed nylon in brown

Body:      Six strands each of gold and dark brown or black Flashabou, tied in along the body starting at the front bend, secured the full length of the desired body - then wound back over itself as a unit being careful to allow the flash to show gold then brown with every turn as a unit.  All of it over-wrapped with medium sized clear V-Rib from the rear to the front... 

Wing:  Three modest bunches of bucktail, almost twice the hook's length starting with bleached white, then 6 to 10 strands of pearl Flashabou Accent, then dyed brown bucktail with 6 to 10 strands of gold Flashabou Accent over, then dyed green bucktail over all.  Since all of this will build up very quickly try to use only two or three turns of thread for each part of the wing (and all of the bucktail should be cut on the bias before tying in place to allow a tapered head).

Head:  Built up with tying thread then super glued after whip finishing (I prefer the original Krazy Glue commonly available everywhere..).  Once the head is dried thoroughly then a dot of yellow paint on each side, allowed to dry for a day - then the center black dot and again allowed to dry thoroughly... The final clear finish coat is FlexCoat - a rodbuilder's finish...

 

Note:  In the past I've used less body materials with good results - and this fly will produce without the painted eyes as well... Remember - when Chico first brought the original bendback patterns to market he noted that he'd never been able to catch tarpon with them at all... He believed that bent patterns simply weren't well suited for a tarpon's mouth.  As a result I've always used them for snook, redfish, and speckled trout... 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Outstanding flies. Thanks for the recipes and photos. I'm thinking of them for carp fishing.

Edit- Noticed the forceps to hold the flies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forceps were the solution I came up with years ago to be able to photograph flies that were designed to ride hook point up....

Whenever I see a photo of those  kind of flies poised upside down it bothers me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Capt Bob, your tying and advice is always inspiring!  I'm sure we've discussed bendbacks in the past here. Your comment about how the commercial hooks are bent, seems to me it's been mentioned. I agree wholeheartedly. 

I tied some last year for a fellow in TX, and didn't bend the hooks at all. I did however, weight them along the shank so they would ride properly with the combination of bucktail in the wing. He wanted some flies that he could fish over deeper oyster beds, for both trout & redfish, didn't want barbells as he said they hung up too much, so I suggested bendback's and with epoxy bodies. 

These are what I came up with for him.

 

 

1119.jpg

1120.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those will work just fine... In the past I’ve gone that route as well, just reverse tying without a bend at all (but with a 1/2” of .040 square lead wire as a keel for a 1/0 hook).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a big fan of bend backs around mangrove shorelines and oyster beds.  My first ever redfish was on a bend back along the southeast shoreline of Tampa Bay.  There are always a few in my saltwater boxes.  Been tying these Myakka Minnows bend back style on the new Umpqua bend back hooks.  Just moved the weight back toward the bend as much as possible.  They worked fine last trip on snook moving along mangroves my last trip to Tampa.

0FDE10E1-42A9-4EAB-8F9A-F068E4BD0535.jpeg.f3a8df108240465b9f14f0d50b4f9156.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...