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Ed Haas Technique - Weitchpec Witch


16 replies to this topic

#1 Lost Coast

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Posted 09 December 2015 - 05:17 PM

aae98550-b3e5-4815-abfd-45d1f5966d25.jpg

 

500a752f-d87b-485d-83b5-0ae6b14c55a9.jpg



#2 jshewey

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 01:57 PM

Very well done! Succinctly shows how the hair is forced down through the return-loop wires. Cheers!



#3 flytire

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 03:33 PM

where is the return loop wire?

 

+ what is the ed haas technique?


Fly tyers are masters at making things complicated


#4 hairwing

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 04:46 PM

where is the return loop wire?

 

+ what is the ed haas technique?

 

Google it !

 

You'll figure it out.

 

Some of us know what he is talking about.


"As far down the river as he could see, the trout where rising, making circles all down the surface of the water, as though it were starting to rain."-E.H. Big Two Hearted River
"As far as the eye could see,several hundred yards at least, the entire surface of the water was a mass of dimpling rise forms, occurring and recurring with increasing tempo as the evening advanced." V. Marinaro...A Modern Dry Fly Code.

#5 flytire

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 07:42 PM

Must be snark day....anyways whatever 

 

googled it not much to find


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#6 Lost Coast

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Posted 10 December 2015 - 09:34 PM

http://sstflies.blog...hpec-witch.html



#7 flytire

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 06:26 AM

john

 

interesting technique

 

thank for sharing 


Fly tyers are masters at making things complicated


#8 Piker20

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 12:26 PM

I'm a little lost as to the benefit of moving the wire. I've yet to have a wing tied facing over the eye and folded back pull out on me.
Matthew 25: 35-36 "Out of every 100 men, 10 shouldnt even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior and he will bring the others back. "No man ever steps in the same river twice"   Heraclitus, 5 B.C

Based Scottish Highlands. UK

MUSTAD The wise anglers choice.

#9 Jaydub

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 02:44 PM

Very nice tutorial!

 

I'm a little lost as to the benefit of moving the wire. I've yet to have a wing tied facing over the eye and folded back pull out on me.

 

 I was at a John Shewey demo and he was asked to demonstrate the Haas' technique, which he did. He said one advantage was that you could easily control the angle of the wing.

 

I can see another benefit. If you just tie the wing, on top, facing forward and fold it back, you are tying over double the thickness of the hair bundle. With Haas' technique you are only tying over one thickness, making the head more compact, at least in the vertical plane.



#10 Lost Coast

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 03:39 PM

Greetings Piker,

 

I cannot ascertain Haas' true intent for moving the wire, but I am sure we can all agree the main intent is trapping/locking the hair in place.  However, I believe it might have been a combination of reasons.  

 

Coupled with trapping the hair,  Haas being a commercial tier, might have opened the wire to speed up the process.  While opening the wire involves an extra step, it does make introducing and securing the hair between the wire much easier- especially when the hair was brought back over to form the head. Additionally, instead of the hair being tied to the top or bottom of the shank, the hair is distributed evenly along the shank making a thinner and even tapered body.  Finally, the head of the fly is finished conical shaped due to the hair being trapped and compressed evenly.

 

Haas was a very intelligent man.  Whether this was his intent or not, the technique simple yet pure genius!



#11 Lost Coast

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 03:46 PM

Very nice tutorial!

 

I'm a little lost as to the benefit of moving the wire. I've yet to have a wing tied facing over the eye and folded back pull out on me.

 

 I was at a John Shewey demo and he was asked to demonstrate the Haas' technique, which he did. He said one advantage was that you could easily control the angle of the wing.

 

I can see another benefit. If you just tie the wing, on top, facing forward and fold it back, you are tying over double the thickness of the hair bundle. With Haas' technique you are only tying over one thickness, making the head more compact, at least in the vertical plane.

 

I plum forgot to include this in the article!  I have burning the midnight oil recently- the fumes must have gotten to me!



#12 Piker20

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Posted 11 December 2015 - 06:19 PM

Umm I'm willing to have a play with the idea to see,in the flesh the difference. I mostly use fox furs or similar compressible furs when tying this type of wing and cant say a smooth tapered body or small head has been a noticeable issue.
Matthew 25: 35-36 "Out of every 100 men, 10 shouldnt even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior and he will bring the others back. "No man ever steps in the same river twice"   Heraclitus, 5 B.C

Based Scottish Highlands. UK

MUSTAD The wise anglers choice.

#13 flytire

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 11:27 AM

my first piss poor attempt

 

found some mustad 9002 hooks and thought i would give it a try

 

too many fibers in the tail

 

wing is the trickiest part in getting the quantity of hairs and the length. inserting the hair between the shank and return wire took many tries

 

i need better hackles

 

steelhead_zpsafxymf0d.jpg

 

oh well i tried :)

 

norm


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#14 Piker20

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 05:31 PM

A lovely fly but your photo displays what I found when I gave it a shot and that is the marked step from body to wing/hackle point. It just doesn't look quite right to my eyes. Too anorexic in that throat area for me.
Matthew 25: 35-36 "Out of every 100 men, 10 shouldnt even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior and he will bring the others back. "No man ever steps in the same river twice"   Heraclitus, 5 B.C

Based Scottish Highlands. UK

MUSTAD The wise anglers choice.

#15 flytire

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Posted 18 December 2015 - 05:52 PM

well lets see that fly you tied

 

remember its my FIRST ATTEMPT

 

only practice makes them close to perfect


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