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Woolys? Leaches? Who knows?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 ct.custom

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 01:53 PM

I am purely just curious... what would you guys call these flys? Woollys, glimmer leaches, buggers, grubber??? Like I said im just curious and dont want to catch an evil eye calling my flys the wrong thing... Also, what species would you throw these at???

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#2 Flicted

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 01:59 PM

Whatever you want to call them.

 

I would throw them at any species.  Leech, damsel, baitfish, worm, small craw, could imitate lots of prey.



#3 Philly

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 02:26 PM

I wouldn't call them Woollies or buggers.  No hackle.  Sparkle/crystal chenille streamers.  Never have figured out what the purple imitates.  I don't have much luck with that color.  The other two, crawfish, leeches, damsel fly or large may fly nymphs.  Based on the size, I'd mainly use them for pan fish and trout, though I'm sure a bass wouldn't turn one down.   Nice neat ties.  Try tying some with pearl chenille and a white marabou tail, excellent bait fish imitation and its always been my most effective bugger color.  


"All things considered, I'd rather be in Philadelphia."

#4 RickZieger

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 02:54 PM

Yes they are flies. Will work on pan fish.

 

Rick



#5 tjm

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 03:48 PM

They quite resemble a marabou crappie jig. I would fish them  the same as a crappie jig. "Beadhead Glitterbou"



#6 Poopdeck

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 09:16 PM

I was thinking crappie jig as well. I would fish them for still water pond bass and crappie.

#7 ct.custom

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Posted 23 April 2019 - 11:53 PM

I wouldn't call them Woollies or buggers.  No hackle.  Sparkle/crystal chenille streamers.  Never have figured out what the purple imitates.  I don't have much luck with that color.  The other two, crawfish, leeches, damsel fly or large may fly nymphs.  Based on the size, I'd mainly use them for pan fish and trout, though I'm sure a bass wouldn't turn one down.   Nice neat ties.  Try tying some with pearl chenille and a white marabou tail, excellent bait fish imitation and its always been my most effective bugger color.  


I really like purple as it is the last color in the spectrum that fish are able to see in low light conditions. In dark water they can see purple the longest than any other

#8 mikechell

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 05:42 AM

I really like purple as it is the last color in the spectrum that fish are able to see in low light conditions.

According to this chart, and others, you're close but not quite ...

 

lure-color-vertical.jpg

 

But then, I doubt any of us (except Mark Knapp) are FLY fishing deeper than 66' ... so we're presenting most or all of the colors we tie with to the fish.


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#9 tjm

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 07:28 AM

Low light isn't limited to water depth, is it? I rarely go fishing on bright days, usually preferring the heavily overcast days  and have been known to fly fish at night, it seems in both that light might be "low".

 

I've never seen a chart like that and immediately wonder where white and or silver fall in/out of sight? 



#10 mikechell

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 07:38 AM

White ... never disappears.  It's visible as long as there's any light penetration.  However, it might not be "palatable" to the fish in every condition.

 

Silver as a color is close to blue ... and probably falls along the light blue line.

Silver as "chrome" is reflective, not a color.  As long as there's even a point of light penetration, it can reflect off chrome.

 

Black is the one I don't understand.  I get that it will stand out against any light background (sand, weed growth, etc.), but in the darkest conditions ... what is there to contrast against.

 

Where I live, most of the water I fish is the color of coffee, literally.  My bright yellow paddle disappears in about 12 inches of water.  I use darker colors because fish eat them ... but it baffles me that they can even see them.


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My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#11 tjm

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 09:25 AM

I have thought that fish often attack from below because even in darkness the sky has enough light that bait contrasts with it. 



#12 Flicted

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 09:32 AM

Many times, fish are below the fly.  Even at night, the sky is lighter than the darkness below and black will stand out more than color or white.



#13 mikechell

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 11:20 AM

Of course, you guys are right, if you're fishing a floating or suspending lure/fly, but I'm usually bouncing along the bottom.

Not that it matters ... and I didn't mean to derail ct's thread.


Barbed hooks rule!
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#14 Philly

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 02:06 PM

I was wondering about white and silver to, Mike.   As I said white's been my most effective color.  Most of the lakes I fish are clear but some of the lakes in the Poconos are tannic from cedar trees.  They're clear but have a brownish tinge to them.  Black I've had some success with but usually where leeches are present and streams that have hellgamites in them.


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#15 ct.custom

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 10:13 AM

Haha mike this sounds like a good thread separate from this one though. Its always good to talk to people that think the same way that you do and have done their research. love this forum for that reason