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The canadian yukon


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7 replies to this topic

#1 rainbowtrouter

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 09:27 AM

Hey, people. I've just moved to the canadian yukon, and havent really got into the fishing yet, as i'm still settling down. Has anyone got any good advice, for starting to fish the yukon. I've moved from britain, and the fishing is completely different. Thanks.

#2 Fly1

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 12:18 PM

Don't feed the bears wink.gif

Ken cool.gif
Credit River Cane Rods
<span style='color:blue'>Ken Paterson, Streetsville, Ontario</span>

#3 tightlines

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 03:24 PM

thats some of the best advice I have ever heard.

Get a .40 calibre pistol and some counter assault bear sprey.

#4 striblue

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 04:35 PM

Never fished there, but ,for saltwater, I would think yoyr best shot would be for sea Run Trout...or shore fishing for some other species...

#5 Carlin

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 04:53 PM

Are you in the Yukon Territory? If so, the fishing there is quite similar to the interior of Alaska, and not much saltwater. Lots of greyling, northern pike, and lake trout. I'll give you some more info if this is on the right track.

#6 fish

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 09:36 AM

I was taking a course in NY state a number of years ago. A friend from the Yukon was driving to Nova Scotia and stopped to visit while I was taking the course. People in the course asked where he was from, he said Yukon and several people responded "what are you taking". Confused we discovered that they were thinking UConn (University of Connecticut). Anyway, that is my only experience with the Yukon.

I think that the fishing must be quite good, northern limit of rainbows (there was an article of Yukon rainbows in a recent Canadian fly fisher I think), grayling and salmon in some rivers with their mouths in Alaska. Not much saltwater in the Yukon and George Bush will have oil pipelines all over the place up there soon anyway - maybe oil is your business though. No personal offence just my opinion on drilling in the arctic wildlife refuge. Certainly the scenery of Kluane National Park is a jaw dropper. Have fun, take advantage of this rare opportunity.

#7 rainbowtrouter

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Posted 22 February 2005 - 07:41 AM

Thanks for the advice guys. I'm in the canadian yukon Carl, so if you could post some info that would be great. I'll try not and fear the bears biggrin.gif !!!!!!!!!

#8 Carlin

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 01:31 PM

You're in for a treat rainbowtrouter! Here is some info on the species you're likely to encounter:

Grayling - The rivers and ponds should be plenty full of these little guys. They will eat just about anything thrown at them, but try smaller sz12-24 dries and sz8-16 nymphs. Wooly buggers, stoneflies and sculpin will also work great. Try something white on the top at dusk, or something with a bit of red during the day. A 3-4 wt rod is ideal for grayling, longer lengths if you are fishing a lake. Medium sized, shorter tippets will be fine as the fish are not likely to be leader shy. Same goes for the trout/charr below, but with commensurately heavier leader.

Trout/charr - Again, should be plenty of trout and charr in those waters. Medium sized flies will work the best, and expect to use some nymphs and weight (either split shot or sink tip line) in the faster moving rivers. The big guys will usually hang deep. Try dragonfly nymphs, stone flies, sculpin and streamer patterns. If they're not hitting on the dead drift, let the fly swing at the end and they'll often come up to investigate. 4-6 wt rods are ideal depending on the fish size and type of water. Try a small mouse pattern at twilight in the deeper holes. You won't have much luck, but once in a while...

Pike - I know there are some monster pike in the yukon, usually in the shallower ponds and slow moving rivers and swamps. Pike will start feeding as soon as the ice starts to break, so once you see some open water in pike country, give it a try. Throw them large, flashy streamers or bass and other topwater flies. Give the fly lots of movement, and try to confine yourself to the more shallow areas with a reed or grassy bottom. Try mouse and lemming patterns as well. If there are pike in a particular body of water and you're not having any luck, grab a spinning rod, a bobber and a package of herring (and some beer doesn't hurt either wink.gif ). Put a piece of herring on a sharp, oversized hook and let it sit out there. The pike will often nibble at it for a while, so don't set the hook until the bobber has gone underwater. Then hit hard and hold on. SpiderWire, or non-monofilamet line, is best with spinning rods. Larger and longer 6-8+wt fly rods are ideal and you'll need a very heavy tippet (20lbs+) or, even better, 6" or so of steel leader before the fly.

Lake Trout - If you have access to a boat you can try for some of the monster lake trout that should be in the area. Usually trolling with flashy spinners is ideal, but sometimes they'll hit a fly. Treat them like you would a trout in a lake.

There are some other species that you will likely encounter like whitefish and burbot. You'll have to ask some of the locals about any other fish in the area.

As for the bears, you don't have to worry much. Just be sure to make plenty of noise (talk and/or sing) as you hike. Avoid dense brush whenever possible and carry some bear spray, or better, a shotgun. A large, tough looking, well trained dog isn't a bad idea either. When you do run into one that seems interested in you, yell at it and wave your arms about if it doesn't bolt right away. Don't run. If they charge, it is most likely a false charge, and they will stop well before they get to you, stand up and act tough, then turn and leave. A spooky experience to be sure. If it is not a false-charge, well, you're on your own there. huh.gif

Bring the nastiest, most poisonous DEET-based mosquito repellant you can find, and bring it with you always, though early spring and fall won't be bad at all. It isn't a terrible idea to have a head net handy as well.