Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

Stomach contents


9 replies to this topic

#1 denduke

denduke

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 972 posts

Posted 03 August 2018 - 05:05 PM

Guys on local SaltyForum talking about strange things found in fish stomachs. One was nutria in a redfish! :shock:
After lil thought I came up with the soon to be infamous BabyNutterRatFly! :lol:
Deer hair, sued leather, plastic bead eyeballs, rubber whiskers, 7/0 hook.
IMG_4405.jpg
IMG_4403.jpg

https://amp.business...ouisiana-2013-5
If you wanta sing the blues, you gotta pay your dues, and you know it don't come easy...RS
Due to severe budget cuts and economic down turn the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off...

#2 mikechell

mikechell

    Cold weather afficando- Give me Snow or give me death!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,498 posts

Posted 03 August 2018 - 09:09 PM

That's got "eat me" written all over it !!!


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#3 fshng2

fshng2

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 948 posts

Posted 04 August 2018 - 05:35 PM

Denduke that thing is gonna get hammered!

Are you targeting reds?



#4 vicrider

vicrider

    Advanced Member

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,683 posts

Posted 06 August 2018 - 04:06 AM

Is Nutria a real animal? I thought Nutria was a close cousin of the Nauga, whose hyde was used for years in the furniture and car industry until the Nauga received Federal protection as an endangered species.



#5 denduke

denduke

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 972 posts

Posted 06 August 2018 - 05:34 AM

https://amp.theguard...of-unusual-size
If you wanta sing the blues, you gotta pay your dues, and you know it don't come easy...RS
Due to severe budget cuts and economic down turn the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off...

#6 mikechell

mikechell

    Cold weather afficando- Give me Snow or give me death!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,498 posts

Posted 06 August 2018 - 06:01 AM

Nope, Vic.  As Denduke's link says (I think ... I didn't read it all), nutria are real rodents about the size of a beaver, and a real pest species.

 

Naugas, on the other hand, were huge animals.  I mean, you can buy an unbroken hide, 12 feet wide and several yards long !!!  Imagine the size of the creature that has THAT much hide on it.  They must've been the size of a house or larger !!!

 

They also must be extinct already, because I've never seen one.  At those sizes, they'd be pretty easy to spot, I'd imagine.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#7 vicrider

vicrider

    Advanced Member

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,683 posts

Posted 06 August 2018 - 08:56 AM

Actually I'd seen them on the tube before but being common at this time to just one area or state most of us have never seen one live. I like the sentence in the documentary trailer, "To eat rabbit you got to get over the "cute" factor. You don't have that problem with Nurtria."  Good comeback on the Nauga Mike.



#8 tjm

tjm

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 984 posts

Posted 06 August 2018 - 10:39 AM

Coypu (native to South America)  were introduced in Oregon and Louisiana as farmed fur animals way back when(1930s) and turned loose when no profit was made. They have now spread up the Mississippi drainage into the boot heel of Mo. from the La. location and I believe all of coastal Or. now has a problem with them.

I read one story of a man laying in one spot and shooting over 700 in La. for the bounty. Only thing that might help control them would be a profitable market for the fur and the meat, the current fur prices don't make it worth the skinning and processing time an there simply has never ever been a successful bounty program on any pest wildlife.  

 

Ironically, someone introduced beaver in the coypu's native area and now they are destroying Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego,  where they have a bounty on beaver and have tried getting the locals to eat beaver.

 

https://en.wikipedia...ierra_del_Fuego

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coypu



#9 Mike West

Mike West

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,326 posts

Posted 12 August 2018 - 08:51 AM

Nice job Denduke
Bass would rip that up also.

#10 vicrider

vicrider

    Advanced Member

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,683 posts

Posted 03 September 2018 - 03:28 AM

Coypu (native to South America)  were introduced in Oregon and Louisiana as farmed fur animals way back when(1930s) and turned loose when no profit was made. They have now spread up the Mississippi drainage into the boot heel of Mo. from the La. location and I believe all of coastal Or. now has a problem with them.

I read one story of a man laying in one spot and shooting over 700 in La. for the bounty. Only thing that might help control them would be a profitable market for the fur and the meat, the current fur prices don't make it worth the skinning and processing time an there simply has never ever been a successful bounty program on any pest wildlife.  

 

Ironically, someone introduced beaver in the coypu's native area and now they are destroying Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego,  where they have a bounty on beaver and have tried getting the locals to eat beaver.

 

https://en.wikipedia...ierra_del_Fuego

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coypu

I'm game to try eating almost anything. I'd give nutria a try but I've had beaver a couple of times fixed different ways and I would never intentionally include on in my diet. Edible maybe, didn't kill any of who ate them, but no one wanted a second helping, even those few of us who actually did finish the first slice. One of the ways cooked was baked in foil after slicing the hell out of it, stuffing all the slices with beef fat trimmed from the steaks down at the local CO-OP, then smothered in bacon, wrapped and baked. Almost edible in the slices including a lot of the beef fat but a lot of work just to try to make something edible.





Reply to this topic