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Best Beginner Fly Tying Book


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196 replies to this topic

#46 wilcara

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Posted 26 June 2005 - 07:53 AM

Fly tying bible by Peter Gathercole is the best beginners book, and a very handy reference for when a beginner no longer. I still use mine heaps.

The Benchside reference is way too intimidating for beginners, at least for a while. Would be of value when basic skills are mastered and they are looking for more info.


Cheers - Chris

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#47 maty31373

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 10:49 AM

I am still a newbie at tying and I picked up the Orvis book. I have really learned a lot from it. BUT.... I have learned more from 2 buddies who have an interest in passing along knowledge. So, in my opinion, the best book is no good without some outside guidance. I have found that if I have a question, all I have to do is ask.


mtw

if you happen to see this, Thank You Harris for all your support.

white

#48 quantm

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 09:35 PM

I am for Peter Gathercole's Fly Tying Buble. Its a very good book giving step by step instructions and photos, materials required and the degree of difficulty.

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#49 Mato Kuwapi

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Posted 01 July 2005 - 06:36 AM

QUOTE (maty31373 @ Jun 27 2005, 10:49 AM)
I am still a newbie at tying and I picked up the Orvis book. I have really learned a lot from it. BUT.... I have learned more from 2 buddies who have an interest in passing along knowledge. So, in my opinion, the best book is no good without some outside guidance. I have found that if I have a question, all I have to do is ask.


mtw

if you happen to see this, Thank You Harris for all your support.

white

Exactly! That's why I like the videos if you don't have anyone around to show you. It's one thing to look at pictures, but actually seeing it done is 100X better. The best way is to pay some bucks and learn from a pro. The next best thing is a local club or a buddy.


"There's more B.S. in fly fishing than there is in a Kansas feedlot." Lefty Kreh

#50 Hot Tuna

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 04:21 PM

Rosenbauer's Orvis book which was previously mentioned and Dick Talleur's LL Bean Guide to Fly Tying...
IMHO.
Hot tuna

#51 ChrisB

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 05:31 PM

Hey gang,


New book I picked up at Barnes and Noble for around $26.00... Fly Tying for Beginners by Peter Gathercole.

All color pictures, step by step instructions and over 50 flies to tie.

Here's what the back of the book states:

"Being able to tie your own flies gives you an added dimension to the already absorbing hobby of fly fishing. This foolproof book is a complete guide to making 50 versatile flies for trout and salmon fishing.

Each featured fly includes an explination of its component parts, from threads and yarns to beads, tinsels and feathers. A full-page photograph of each fly is also presented.

Clear instructions allow you to master the core techniques quickly, and detailed photographs take you through every stage of the proces, from dubbing the body to fixing the hook.

Learn how to make sturdy dry flies, wet flies, bugs, nymphs, hairwigs, and streamers. Each entry indicates where the fly should sit in the water, and which fish it is best suited to catch."

The book grabbed my attention because it's spiral bound and I can easily keep the book open while I tie a fly. I love it.

Chris

#52 gidflies

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 11:57 PM

Thanks for all the good info,Im also a newbie to the fly fishing world.I got tired of drowning worms.I just joined the group and hope to get some great advice. Chris

#53 gmaschke

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 07:08 PM

I had several books but I enlisted in a steelhead fly tying class with a guy by the name of Mark Fritch when I was living in Bay City. I tell ya I learned more in 5-10 minutes than any other time. I still have books for reference but by all means take a class or meet up with a fellow tyer. No one in my area I know tyes but hear all the time about small groups getting together on cold winter days to tye at someones house and such. Im in the thumb if your near let me know

#54 greifs

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 08:11 PM

I've heard a lot of people recommending Fly Tier's Benchside Reference but also people saying the book was expensive at $100. Just thought I'd let everyone know I found it at Walmart.com for $59.95 and Amazom for like $63. I'm going to see if my local walmart will order it for me to save the shipping.

have a great day.

#55 mctwist

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 01:54 PM

QUOTE(Salmo22 @ Apr 10 2005, 03:34 PM) View Post

Try the book "Basic Fly Tying" by Wayne Luallen and John Rounds. Photographs are by Michael Radencich. I think this is simply the best beginner book - period!


I just got the French translation of the book, and if the english one's as good, it's definitaly a good choice. There's explanation of the basic tools, techniques and a few fly patterns to get you started, and the pictures are well detailed, with great step-by-step instructions. You can't go wrong with that book.

#56 madkasel

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 04:27 PM

I suggest that a beginner start at the library... get a whole mess of books and figure out which style works best for you.

I thought I'd like the colorful little ones that are chock full of patterns, but only 6 - 8 steps for each, but nope. I like a little more. I'm a big fan of the Jack Dennis Western Fly books... good classic patterns and a great story to go with each. Makes me feel like I'm immersing myself in something with a foundation.


The precious stones in the queen's round metal hat glittered like jewels in a crown.

#57 greifs

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Posted 16 May 2006 - 05:31 PM

I've just order The Benchside [/u]Introduction[u] to Fly Tying by Ted Leeson and Jim Schollmeyer and I'll be sure to comment when it gets in... back order ships in 4-6 weeks.

What they've done is split the book horizontally, fly patterns on the top half that reference techniques that are on the bottom half. you keep the book open to your fly pattern and can flip to different pages in the bottom half if you need help with a technique. Amazon for $28.35 and free shipping.

If anyone already has it, feedback would be appreciated.


#58 stony

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 05:28 PM

I have Rosenbaugh's Orvis book also. I thought it was pretty good initially but it doesn't go into detail on too many flies.

I would like a how to book on let's just say 150 different patterns. Not just 15 or so.
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#59 Iowaflyguy

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Posted 07 August 2006 - 10:57 PM



I want to second "greifs" thoughts. Leeson and Schollmeyer are grear authors and the idea sounds really great.
I would like to get one but I think I might have "outgrown" it. If I ever wanted to teach someone it sounds like
the book to get.

Still editorials are not that reliable HAS ANYONE SEEN THE BOOK? I am anxious to hear if it is as good as it sounds.

Tom


#60 flyboyutah

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 02:22 PM

I as a begginner i picked up "The fly-tying Bible" as one of my first books it has most of your basic flies. From dry, wet , streamers and few nymps