Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

Anyone know why...


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Bryon Anderson

Bryon Anderson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,951 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 12:15 PM

...the spools that fly lines come on are made in two pieces that come apart? I'm guessing it's something simple, like it's cheaper to make them that way or something, but I can't see for the life of me what purpose it serves for the purchaser of the line. And I can think of an OUTSTANDING reason NOT to make them that way; namely, the fact that they tend to come apart with line and backing spooled onto them, leaving you with a godawful mess!

 

Last night, I used my "Reel-E-Good" line winder device to remove my 7 wt. line and attached backing from the reel and spool it onto an old fly line spool that I had. When I went to pull the spool off the line winder, it came apart, and the ensuing tangle was so bad that I chucked the whole mess in the trash. (I needed to replace that line anyway, so the only real waste was the backing.) I was really glad my kids weren't home, because I uncorked some of my choicest vocabulary, I can tell you. :)

 

Anyway -- does anyone know for sure why those spools come apart like that? Seems stupid to me...


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#2 flytire

flytire

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11,515 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 12:50 PM

ive never given it much thought

 

the factory spool is probably split to allow the user to remove the line as a coil and to install the line on a line winder

 

photo-05.jpg

 

not all winders are "Reel-E-Good" winders


We do it all the time! Get over it!


#3 fshng2

fshng2

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,178 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 12:51 PM

So lines tangle, people chuck them, and buy more.

#4 steeldrifter

steeldrifter

    When I grow up, I'm moving to Florida !!!

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 16,979 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 01:42 PM

Can't say exactly. But just makes it easier to get them into nice coils so you can store them easily with out the plastic pieces taking up space is what my reasoning has always been.


mcfr.jpg
Owner- Steve Clark
Midwestcustomflyrods.com


Better to have a short life that is full of what you like doin, than a long life spent in a miserable way- Alan Watts
 
 
 


#5 RickZieger

RickZieger

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 650 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 03:31 PM

Because they do not like me.

 

Rick



#6 mikechell

mikechell

    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,916 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 04:18 PM

Most likely reason: The factory robots don't "wind" new lines onto the spools.  They produce a coil of fly line with the appropriate taper ... then it's dropped onto on half of the spool, then the other half of the spool is "capped" in place.  In other words, it makes the production line more efficient.

 

I reuse the spools all the time, and have never had one come apart.  But then, I've always been aware of that possibility and worked with the spools to ensure they don't.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#7 xvigauge

xvigauge

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 310 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 05:01 PM

I have had some fly lines that ended up in a god awful tangles from the spool coming apart and other various reasons. I have a very unusual amount of patience (probably from having taught high school for close to 30 years) so, I have always been able to get the lines untangled. First you need several feet of floor space, like an open room. Then, find one end of the line and constantly feed it through the loops and tangles little by little and slowly. As you get more and more of the line free, walk it toward the far wall of the room and keep making large loops on the floor, back and forth. Pretty soon, you will be at the other end of the line and you are untangled. Now wrap it onto the object of your choice (I use an empty coffee can) or start reeling it onto a reel and go and be happy. It works for me buy YMMV.

Joe



#8 flytire

flytire

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11,515 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 05:19 PM

Rio - Making fly line

 

https://www.youtube....4&v=QS_lGuy3tMA

 

lines are coiled on machines (not the actual spool) then placed on 1/2 of the plastic spool. the other half added before boxing (shown at the end of video)


We do it all the time! Get over it!


#9 flyty1

flyty1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 319 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 08:27 PM

The primrary reason the fly line spools are made so they can come apart is so the line can be removed from the packaging and used to measure how much backing can be wound on the fly reel before the line (with tge backing) will fill the reel without exceeding the capacity of the reel!

#10 mikechell

mikechell

    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,916 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 09:40 PM

??? flyty ???

How does the spool coming apart allow for measuring backing? 

The only way I know how to do backing is to wind the fly line on the reel, gentle tie on your backing, then reel it in until it's filled the spool to desired depth.  Then remove the lines (putting them back on empty fly line spools) and reinstalling it one the reel in the proper order with the proper knots.

Separating the product spool doesn't help with this process in any way.

 

How do YOU do it?


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#11 Bryon Anderson

Bryon Anderson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,951 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 11:17 PM

ive never given it much thought

 

the factory spool is probably split to allow the user to remove the line as a coil and to install the line on a line winder

 

photo-05.jpg

 

not all winders are "Reel-E-Good" winder

Ah....good points, both. That makes sense. 


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#12 Bryon Anderson

Bryon Anderson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,951 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 11:18 PM

So lines tangle, people chuck them, and buy more.

LOL probably! laugh.png


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#13 Bryon Anderson

Bryon Anderson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,951 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 11:21 PM

Can't say exactly. But just makes it easier to get them into nice coils so you can store them easily with out the plastic pieces taking up space is what my reasoning has always been.

Yep, that would make sense, too. I guess it didn't occur to me that people would store lines coiled up but not on a spool or something like a spool. Before I got my line winder, I used to wrap my lines around old coffee cans. Every time I've ever tried to just coil one up by itself, it ended up in a horrific bird's nest. 


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#14 Bryon Anderson

Bryon Anderson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,951 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 11:23 PM

I reuse the spools all the time, and have never had one come apart.  But then, I've always been aware of that possibility and worked with the spools to ensure they don't.

Yeah....you'd think I'd have learned to do that by now, too. :) 


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#15 Bryon Anderson

Bryon Anderson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,951 posts

Posted 03 July 2019 - 11:25 PM

I have had some fly lines that ended up in a god awful tangles from the spool coming apart and other various reasons. I have a very unusual amount of patience (probably from having taught high school for close to 30 years) so, I have always been able to get the lines untangled. First you need several feet of floor space, like an open room. Then, find one end of the line and constantly feed it through the loops and tangles little by little and slowly. As you get more and more of the line free, walk it toward the far wall of the room and keep making large loops on the floor, back and forth. Pretty soon, you will be at the other end of the line and you are untangled. Now wrap it onto the object of your choice (I use an empty coffee can) or start reeling it onto a reel and go and be happy. It works for me buy YMMV.

Joe

That is exactly what I used to do before I had the line winder -- I would always block out at least an hour to change out a fly line, because it was inevitable that I would end up going through that process at least once! :) 


"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman