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Help with picking out a fly rod


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14 replies to this topic

#1 TIER

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 03:51 PM

What is your opinion about graphite rods? I need something that  will withstand a lot of use. https://www.ebay.com...e/182971693172?
Salmon, Halibut, Rockfish, and lingcod.


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#2 tjm

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 04:50 PM

The several graphite rods  I've owned were strong casters but fragile, I went back to fiberglass for most of my fishing, I may be too rough for graphite but I've had about five that broke while fishing, one was broken and repaired three times. The experts say this is generally the result of previous impacts that cause unseen internal damage, all I know is they broke under load while casting or fishing. How does a rod not get bumped now and then?

I like shorter rods than are common in graphite and generally slower action than most modern graphite. Long and stiff rods tire me much quicker and hurt my shoulder more. But. I may  be the only one who feels that way. For my money the all around rod is 7'-8' and 6,7,or 8 weight. It will bend into the grip under a full load and have a fast mid and a tip soft enough to protect 1# tippet when trout fishing. My rods also will cast moderately well with lines lighter and heavier than the suggested weights.

Now, here's the rub, because every ones casting ability varies and everyone is taller or shorter with longer or shorter arms no two people will cast exactly the same with any given rod. You will have to hold it in your hands and make some cast with the flies you normally fish with and at least three differing lines before you know if it is a dream rod with built in magic or just a tool, or worst case something you hate. No one knows what works you but you. If I had the casting ability to use all my flies on a 2wt I probably would like a 2wt better, but the 6/7wts get me by and cover up my lack of form. 

 

PS I know nothing about any of the fish you listed, they don't grow them down here.



#3 Swampfoxforeman

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 04:55 PM

Tier I would see if steeldrifter would make you one. Highly recommend him.



#4 mikechell

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 05:32 PM

If you have the money ... I don't think you could go wrong with that E-bay deal.  $80.00 for a rod is right in MY ballpark, if I wanted that type of rod.

If you don't like it, you can probably sell it for at least what you bought it for.

You then become the expert on that rod, if anyone else asks about it.

 

All of my rods are graphite or composite rods.  New materials ... no fiberglass or bamboo for me.  We can't have flying cars, jet packs and colonies on the Moon ... but I can have modern materials in my fishing equipment.


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#5 Rocco

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 07:47 PM

Sounds to me like you should  go to a dedicated salt water site for serious, experience-based, inputs. Most of the fish you are after require lifting and turning power applications beyond those in most fresh water tests of rods.  That is why in general many modern thin-walled graphite rods fail under such stress with even the slightest pre-existing wall damage.  I've had them explode on modest size, hot, GL salmon.  

 

Fiberglass rods will bend down into the cork with reserve flex potential w/o getting to break point.

 

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#6 vicente

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 09:23 PM

Mark would really be the only one who could give you solid input on this, I would imagine you'll want a 10 wt or more.
For me personally unless I really just want to say I caught it fly fishing I would just use a standard rod for those bottom dwelling ocean fish, I'd just tie and fish flys behind weights or hand tie jigs. As a personal challenge Mark wants to catch every Alaskan game fish on a fly rod I'm sure that's one of the reasons he pursues these fish with a fly rod.

#7 Bill_729

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 09:35 PM


All of my rods are graphite or composite rods.  New materials ... no fiberglass or bamboo for me.  We can't have flying cars, jet packs and colonies on the Moon ... but I can have modern materials in my fishing equipment.

 

Yes, you can.  But that doesn't make them better. If your goal is to "cast  farther", then they are better for that. Graphite is probably even easier to cast.  But that's not the whole story.  IMO, Nice fiberglass with DT line beats a rod heavily loaded with WF line in balance (my word). Yes, if you want to really load and sling line, graphite can sling it farther. My experience is not vast, but, based upon your post,  I'm not sure you have experienced the fiberglass and DT approach yet.


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#8 mikechell

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 09:47 PM

Been there, done that.  Been fly fishing for about 50 years.  My choices in fly rods are based on experience.


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#9 vicente

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 10:25 PM

I'll take a faster rod with a shooting head line or wf over a slower heavier fiberglass rod anyday.

As far as being brittle I've kept a graphite/carbon fiber fly rod in my work truck for the last 3+ years no problem, I've never broken a graphite rod other than slamming it in a door or stepping on it.

#10 tjm

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 11:01 PM

Tier, will you be using this from boat? What kind of water? 3' deep or 60' deep?  The halibut story I read used 8' 14 wt graphite rod but said there was no casting from the boat. 

 

In the heavy weights (over 8wt) I'd agree the carbon gets an advantage in handled weight and at those sizes I might choose differently, this would also apply to over  9' in length. For me that is kind of a change over area. But it's also an area where I'd consider casting gear.

I don't  recall ever handling a 7' or 7.5' 6wt graphite fly rod.



#11 steeldrifter

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 11:08 PM

Tier the advice I will give you is this. Find someone that is doing what you are wanting to do/catching what you are wanting to catch, and talk to them before buying anything. Someone mentioned Mark, I think he would be a good one to speak to first because he's up there in Alaska as well and catches the fish you are mentioning. Always good to speak with someone that has exp in the type of fishing you are wanting to do first before you start looking at specific rods.


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#12 utyer

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 12:40 PM

I would SECOND what steeldrifter said.  First talk to people who are doing what you want, and talk with them.  I might also point out that the particular rod can be bought DIRECT from the manufacturer's website for just under $70.00.  That is NOT any type of endorsement of the product, In fact I wouldn't buy it until I learned a LOT more about them.  I am simply letting you know that you can find it any time without overpaying.  


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#13 TIER

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 05:00 PM

I am waiting for mark knapp to see this.


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#14 Mark Knapp

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 07:38 PM

I'm not an expert on rod materials like many of these guys that's why I haven't chimed in before this. Having only been fly casting for six years, I would defer to the more experienced guys that have answered.

 

I can tell you that all my rods are more modern, probably carbon fiber or graphite (maybe those are the same material, I don't know) but I don't have any experience with the other rod materials to compare them.

 

As I mentioned before, for my deep sea fly fishing (I know, that sounds counter intuitive) I use 10,12,13,14,and 16 wt. rods. My buddy uses a 9 wt. TFO. We like to use the lighter wt. rods more than the heavy rods because the action is better for casting and the fight is more fun but, as I also mentioned, we have broken a lot of ten wt. rods doing this. That's why I use garage sale rods for deep, salt water.

 

It took me six years to learn how to do this, you are a young guy and have lots of time. Try not to be in a rush to do everything. A suitable rod and reel for salmon and shallow water rock fish will not be the same one I use for lings and halibut. I would decide what kind of fishing you will be doing most and buy a rod for that.

 

If a broken rod is going to set you back, don't fish for lings and halibut with it.

 

I suggest you do what I do and get them at a garage sale, or used ones on eBay. I have gotten super deals there.

 

Although we sometimes use 9 and 10 wt. rods for lings and halibut, those two species require a different reel and line set-up than salmon and shallow water salt water fishing. As I mentioned in another thread, for the deep water fishing I make up our fly lines using 120 feet of T20 and T17 sinking fly lines. That kind of line will cost you more than the fly rod you are considering. Then you will need a large capacity, large arbor reel for all that line and backing. Those reels, at least ours cost a minimum of $200.00 each.

 

One other thing I should mention, is that the deep water fishing that we do can not be done in the majority of the water on Alaska's cost. There is simply too much current to get the fly to the bottom in most places. It will be pretty near impossible in Cook Inlet and in most of the waters around Valdez. We have found a place west of Sitka that fills up more like a bathtub instead of having the serious rip currents that most of Alaska's waters have.

 

I wish you the best my friend. Always happy to answer questions.



#15 Meeshka

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Posted 16 October 2019 - 12:30 PM

My 2 cents worth

If casting an 8 - 10 wt rod would suffice for salmon, steelhead, trout in Alaska, and I'm not as fortunate as you to live there but I,ve fished AK several times.  In smaller rivers where I anticipate the biggest fish I might catch would be 10 lbs, my 6 wt.  I grew up on this rod, can easily cast it all day several days in a row.  Ever try doing that with an 8 or 10 wt?  I may break off more often but still enjoy the experience.

 

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If trolling (or I suppose jigging) for big fish I use a 13 wt Pieroway.  The Abel reel is spooled with backing and 20# leadcore, 4 ft mono leader. An old BC trick.   Depending on the speed, and as Mark said current profile I've been as deep as 60 feet.  I know cause I hung up on the bottom.  This is NOT a casting rod at all.

More importantly, note the foregrip and fighting butt.  For big fish that hug the bottom I can apply some leverage. The rod is only 8 ft and its 13 wt. Sure I've seen it done with 8 wts but I've also seen just as many break from just using a hand on bare blank and applying that leverage.  To me this is a most important feature for big bottom fish.

Now I wouldn't go spooling the reel with mono and hanging 1, 2, even 3 oz of wt to chase those halibut or cod.  Those fish are too tasty and sought after to break rods on.  There are more effective set ups.

 

For that price Tier it is probably worth a shot.  Mine was custom and cost $400.00 CDN

 

Just my opinion

 

Doug