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New home for hackle


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8 replies to this topic

#1 jdowney

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 05:11 PM

I knocked this out in a couple hours, fun project and smells good too.  Don't know if it will keep the bugs away from my feathers, but figure its worth a shot.  Cedar is a bit of a pain to work, but it came out ok for quick and dirty work.

 

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#2 Mark Knapp

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 06:03 PM

If some of those feathers are too long for your box, you can send them to me.biggrin.png



#3 flytire

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 06:31 PM

i'm carpentry challanged so i use a plastic bin similar to below

 

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Most fishermen use the double haul to throw their casting mistakes further - Lefty Kreh


#4 tjm

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 07:42 PM

I once built a cedar tying table with drawers  and a laminate top to make it easy to clean. I got more stuff and ended up selling it and building a larger plywood and formica cabinet with lean back doors, large material drawers and hangers for the capes. I got more stuff and ended up selling that. My fly shop guy that had sold them for me, suggested  an 18 gallon tote (He uses two and just piles stuff in.)

I have mine subdivided with boxes similar to flytire's in several sizes and shapes.

I never got bugs in any of these for many years, and then I did. I don't think cedar makes a great deal of difference to moths, but it looks good and smells nice to me.

I hope you enjoy that box for many years.



#5 DFoster

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 07:05 AM

I knocked this out in a couple hours, fun project and smells good too.  Don't know if it will keep the bugs away from my feathers, but figure its worth a shot.  Cedar is a bit of a pain to work, but it came out ok for quick and dirty work.

 

attachicon.gif IMGP8902.JPG

 

attachicon.gif IMGP8907.JPG

That's some impressive wood working!


And you thought golf was frustrating-


#6 mikemac1

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 09:16 AM

Very Nice box. You can enhance the ‘bug deterrence” of any container through the use of Camphor Blocks. I started using them in the Philippines in the early 1980s to protect my fly tying feathers and fur. Still have unopened boxes of chinese camphor blocks as a single block will last many years. They are cheap and they work. My stuff survived 12 years in the Deep South as well. Available on Amazon.

#7 jcozzz

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 06:31 PM

cedar does protect against moths.They sell super thin planks for lining closets and drawers,I think the key is to refresh with cedar.I only got critters once and i believe they had already infested a skin i bought from a fly shop that had a funk to it.A cheap low quality cape from asia.It was stored with other feathers and most suffered some damage.I think they eventually suffocated in the air tite container.



#8 jdowney

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 07:29 PM

Thanks guys.

 

cedar does protect against moths.They sell super thin planks for lining closets and drawers,I think the key is to refresh with cedar.I only got critters once and i believe they had already infested a skin i bought from a fly shop that had a funk to it.A cheap low quality cape from asia.It was stored with other feathers and most suffered some damage.I think they eventually suffocated in the air tite container.

 

The thin stuff for closets is what I used - too far to a proper lumber yard, so I picked up what Home Depot had.  It was a bit expensive for what you get, but then I didn't have to spend time driving to Albuquerque, resawing the boards, and then planing them to 1/4" or 3/8".  Its getting so the time is worth more to me than saving $20.  This stuff is a little under 1/4", and it isn't quite dry enough for working, so I let it sit a week.  I have a small can of cedar oil too in case it ever smells less than cedaricious in there - I've had the can for years but I think Home Depot sells that too.

 

I used to get bug problems storing stuff in ziplocs.  I think it was cheap capes too - back in the day that was all I bought.  The worst was capes off my own chickens and turkey quills I saved - but those weren't stored with the rest of my materials so I just pitched them.  Too bad about the quills, those were nice.  Should have remembered the borax, I forgot that was a good insecticide at the time.



#9 DFoster

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 07:07 AM

Thanks guys.

 

 

.  Its getting so the time is worth more to me than saving $20.

Same here!  You can always make more money but you can't more time.


And you thought golf was frustrating-