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Flats Boots?


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39 replies to this topic

#1 todvan

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:16 AM

I am getting a chance to fish flats for bonefish on spring break.  I have regular wading boots for my stocking foot waders, but would need neoprene socks to use these, plus they are bulky to pack.  I am wondering if it would just be better to buy some boots designed for flats fishing or I see some people use dive boots.  Don't want to spend a bunch of $ for something I might use rarely at best.....any advice??


Fish on.....

#2 utyer

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 09:40 AM

Many flats boots are neoprene socks with a rubber sole and zipper.   Bass Pro has them for $29.95 like these.  They come in sand and blue.

 

I have had a similar pair for 25 years, good for boating, kayaking, and wading the flats.

 

 

 

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#3 3bone

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:36 AM

I am getting a chance to fish flats for bonefish on spring break.  I have regular wading boots for my stocking foot waders, but would need neoprene socks to use these, plus they are bulky to pack.  I am wondering if it would just be better to buy some boots designed for flats fishing or I see some people use dive boots.  Don't want to spend a bunch of $ for something I might use rarely at best.....any advice??

I have used those neoprene flats boots for years; but old tennis shoes are great...harder soles.  The shoe strings can be a problem if you are fly fishing.  http://www.threebone.com  is a website with more than enough information in regards to Flats Fishing For Bonefish in the Florida Keys, for the Do It Yourself people, by Roadside wading the flats from Key West to Islamorada.    The site explains, where, when, How,  with Flats Fishing reports, bonefish photos, flats fishing blog, and even a humor blog.  If you are going bonefishing anywhere, it is a good place to search for flats fishing information.  Enjoy your trip.

 

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#4 kentuckytroutbum

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 11:08 AM

Utyer and 3bone have given some good advice. You CAN use tennis shoes, but I found that they don't support your ankles, and also let in sand which feels like 100 grit sandpaper! Utyer gave you one boot, and I use a pair of flats boots manuf. by bite that I bought at Cabelas. The velcro strap keeps out sand, and the boot should protect your feet from coral outcroppings, and stinging urchins, blue ringed octopus, etc.

 

Which ever way you go, get a pair of neoprene wading "socks" to wear with them.

 

Bill



#5 sandflyx

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 12:45 PM

on the northeast coast I wear a pair of shortys over my breathables. hate wearing wading shoes on the beach. got mine from Orvis 10 years ago. http://reviews.orvis...3XH/reviews.htm


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#6 dontheo

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 01:21 PM

Todvan:

 

It really depends were you are fishing and the bottom structure and what type of nasty crap is in the water.  Here on the gulf coast, I used to wade with just old tennis shoes and shorts and just took the occasional jelly fish sting.  Now, I would not go in the Gulf of Mexico without Ray Guards.  Until you have witnessed someone stung by a Ray you can't comprehend the pain.  Do a search and see what type of crap lives in the water you plan to fish.  Also check the forcasts and see what the tide has brought in. 

 

I love salt water fishing but besides curing jock itch and athletes foot, there are a lot of things that can go wrong in it.  The good me anyway is that I always seem to catch something unlike fresh water fishing.  

 

I am not one to take a whole bunch of first aide crap with me.  I usually just strap on an old beater colt .45 just in case.  But when in the salt water I like to prepare.   


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#7 mikechell

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 01:59 PM

Utyer and 3bone have given some good advice. You CAN use tennis shoes, but I found that they don't support your ankles, and also let in sand which feels like 100 grit sandpaper! Utyer gave you one boot, and I use a pair of flats boots manuf. by bite that I bought at Cabelas. The velcro strap keeps out sand, and the boot should protect your feet from coral outcroppings, and stinging urchins, blue ringed octopus, etc.

 

Which ever way you go, get a pair of neoprene wading "socks" to wear with them.

 

Bill

The Blue Ringed Octopus is a Pacific and Indian Ocean denizen.  It is not found in the Gulf or Caribbean.

There are, as has been stated, Rays and Urchins and just sharp edges crabs and shells, along with the all too frequent "Broken Bottle fish" and "Tin or Aluminum Can fish" introduced by stupid humans.

But all in all, the gulf is probably one of the safest places in salt water to wade.  If the water temps are above 70 F, you can probably walk around in sandals and be quite comfortable.


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#8 Wavey1988

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:19 PM

Mention of sea urchins made me shudder. Got bad memories of those things, and still have the scar. 



#9 JSzymczyk

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:01 AM

I have a set of Cabela's flats booties similar to the ones pictured.   No straps and zippers are going to keep ALL the sand out.  I found wearing a pair of thin synthetic socks (coolmax cycling socks) under the boots made it much more comfortable. 

 

Do the "Stingray Shuffle" whenever possible and you should be OK.... most of the time.    I've waded Port St. Joe when the stingrays were so thick they were brushing against my legs just swimming by at dusk.  

 

Ray-guards are always a good idea, and the more confident you are the better you will fish.


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#10 Capt Bob LeMay

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:02 AM

Choose whatever foot covering is most convenient and will protect your feet.  Make sure that the soles are strong enough to wade on rock or coral and that the sides protect your ankles...

 

Sting rays, urchins, sharp coral edges - all are hazards when wading.... the greatest hazard in warm water wading is a particularl infection that every wader should research and understand.  There's a particular bacteria that's in all warm salt or brackish waters - the short name is "vibrio".  Any cut or wound in warm water can generate a vibrio infection.  Here's the deal to remember.  If you come up with the slightest infection from a break in the skin keep a very close eye on it.  Any sign that it's progressing (inflamed area growing.... despite treatment) then get to an emergency room NOW.... Ask the treating physician to check for vibrio.  If they find it they'll know how to treat it.  The problem is that it can progress so quickly that you can lose a limb in just a day or two....  Delay in treatment can be life threatening (google up vibrio intection for the particulars...).  Popular press usually labels these kind of infections "flesh eating".  The problem with  vibrio is that it can multiply so quickly that it overwhelms your normal defenses.  A vibrio infection is a particular problem along the Gulf coast in warm seasons....  No, a vibrio infection is not very common - but you should be aware of the possibility any time you're wading in warm waters....


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#11 mikechell

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:49 AM

Thank you Capt. Bob.  I don't fish salt water, for a lot of reasons.  You've just given me another.  I thought the "flesh eating" bacteria was fresh water only ... now I know it's salt water, too.  

Chalk that up to reason 4,287 why I don't bother driving all the way to the coast.


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#12 kentuckytroutbum

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:50 AM

Mikechell-

 

Not trying to start an argument regarding Blue Rings, but I have had fishing guides in the Carib. point them out to me. They are usually found around docks & jetties late in the afternoon or early evening. Granted they are small, and very pretty and very rare, how they got there is anyone's guess. Perhaps someone dumped their aquatic "pet" when they realized how poisonous they are!

 

But I think the point that every responder has made is to get a good pair of flats boots, and protect your feet. There are things in the turtle grass and sand that can hurt you if you're careless or inattentive.

 

Bill



#13 Wavey1988

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:55 AM

Mikechel-

 

Not trying to start an argument regarding Blue Rings, but I have had fishing guides in the Carib. point them out to me. They are usually found around docks & jetties late in the afternoon or early evening. Granted they are very pretty and very rare, how they got there is anyone's guess. Perhaps someone dumped their aquatic "pet" when they realized how poisoness they are!

 

But I think the point that every responder has made is to get a good pair of flats boots, and protect your feet. There are things in the turtle grass and sand that can hurt you if you're careless or inattentive.

 

Bill

 

I have heard a lot of alien marine species can get introduced from ballast tanks being filled in one place, then dumped in another. Keeping octopus as a pet is a royal pain in the arse so my bet would be ballast tanks 



#14 Capt Bob LeMay

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 10:19 AM

Down here in south Florida and the Caribbean we're struggling with a serious invasive fish - the Lionfish... by all accounts it came through the  Panama Canal in some fashion from the Pacific and is now very well established.  It has venomous spines, no known enemies and is taking over some shallow water reef areas.  It's such a problem now that they're starting to hold tournaments (and posting recipes.....) to combat the problem.  Most anglers want nothing to do with them..... "poisonous spines" is probably the first reason....


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#15 kentuckytroutbum

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 10:28 AM

Capt. Bob-

 

You're correct about the Lionfish. When we were in Roatan a year ago, we were told that it was becoming a real problem, especially on the north shore. Unofficially, fishing guides, and dive operators were being told to eliminate them by whatever "method" you choose. The owner of our resort told us the same thing.

 

Bill