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29 replies to this topic

#1 dflanagan

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 12:34 AM

I've been buying different threads as I empty spools. I started with Danville 70d, 6/0, 210d, and 3/0. Moved to uni-thread 8/0, utc 140d, and some unknown stuff. I just got some uni 6/0.

So far the uni 8/0 is my favorite but it's just a bit too thin for larger flies...say 14 and larger. The uni 6/0 is too thick for flies smaller than 8 it seems (maybe even too heavy for 8s). Danville 6/0 (70d) seems to fray a bit too easily and the utc 140 is just not my favorite to work with for some reason? Danville 3/0 (210d) is only used on big flies.

What others should I try that might get me in between the uni 8/0 and 6/0? I've used some veevus gsp and wasn't impressed but I haven't used any of their standard thread. Worth a shot? Any other threads out there that I should consider? Or should I just work on my technique (it could totally use some work) and keep what I've got?
Tight lines,
David

#2 Mogup

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 01:46 AM

I like UTC 70 though it will fray if it catches something and I also like Sheer thread 14/0.

#3 chugbug27

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 02:06 AM

If you like uni try benechi, similar properties but more bite. Maybe a 10/0, possibly their 8/0 for your sizing needs. My experience is with the 12/0, which is slightly smaller profile than uni 8/0.
cb27

#4 flytire

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 05:02 AM

i use veevus 12/0 for mostly everything i tie (easy to get used to)

 

i dont follow the old supposed rule of this size thread for this size hook


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#5 dflanagan

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Posted 27 June 2018 - 12:01 PM

I like UTC 70 though it will fray if it catches something and I also like Sheer thread 14/0.

That, I think, is my biggest complaint with UTC 140. Seems to fray so much easier than others I've used.

 

Thanks for the tips, everyone. I'll grab some spools you all have mentioned and give them a shot. 


Tight lines,
David

#6 phg

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 07:27 AM

Try using ceramic bobbins.  It cuts down of the fraying, but doesn't eliminate it.  What you have to learn to do is to feed the thread slowly so you aren't wearing on the same spot all the time.  Also, you might have to develop a lighter touch when winding.  Danville 6/0 (140d) is hard to beat for size 12 and 14 flies (most of what I tie.) 



#7 dflanagan

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 09:14 AM

Try using ceramic bobbins.  It cuts down of the fraying, but doesn't eliminate it.  What you have to learn to do is to feed the thread slowly so you aren't wearing on the same spot all the time.  Also, you might have to develop a lighter touch when winding.  Danville 6/0 (140d) is hard to beat for size 12 and 14 flies (most of what I tie.) 

I probably do need to work on slowing down a bit and lightening up the tension. I have a dr. Slick ceramic bobbin holder but it's a bit too small to be comfortable. I just got a loon ergo bobbin holder. Have only tied a few flies with it so far but it's really cut down on the fraying with the thread I've used and it's really comfortable. I like Danville but I ran out of the 6/0 stuff. May try it again but I'm really liking uni-thread right now. Gonna see how veevus and benechi work next, I think.

Thanks for the tips. biggrin.png


Tight lines,
David

#8 Sandan

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 09:25 AM

 

Try using ceramic bobbins.  It cuts down of the fraying, but doesn't eliminate it.  What you have to learn to do is to feed the thread slowly so you aren't wearing on the same spot all the time.  Also, you might have to develop a lighter touch when winding.  Danville 6/0 (140d) is hard to beat for size 12 and 14 flies (most of what I tie.) 

I probably do need to work on slowing down a bit and lightening up the tension. I have a dr. Slick ceramic bobbin holder but it's a bit too small to be comfortable. I just got a loon ergo bobbing holder. Have only tied a few flies with it so far but it's really cut down on the fraying with the thread I've used and it's really comfortable. I like Danville but I ran out of the 6/0 stuff. May try it again but I'm really liking uni-thread right now. Gonna see how veevus and benechi work next, I think.

Thanks for the tips. biggrin.png

 

And watch out for the hook point!!!!



#9 rstaight

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 10:35 AM

I have used only UTC 70 denier since my wife gave me an Ekich automatic bobbin for Christmas. I do have some Danville 12/0 that I expect to try in it shortly.

 

I used to break a lot of thread in 70 denier and smaller with standard bobbin holders, ceramic or not. And as Sandan so gracefully pointed out, watch the hook point.


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#10 dflanagan

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 12:01 PM

And watch out for the hook point!!!!

Always. Still gets me from time to time but I avoid it for the most part.

The issue isn't breaking the thread so much as fraying. But even that is secondary to just having too much bulk in the fly, especially at the head, even when laying thread flat all the way through tying. It's probably just me taking too many turns when tying in materials and/or crowding the eye. Lots of work to do.

Thanks for all the suggestions, everyone.
Tight lines,
David

#11 Dave G.

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 02:32 PM

Fraying or not for me has always come down to tension on the spool. Barring a bad spool of thread and the differences between threads, get the tension right for each brand and size thread and it probably won't fray on you.

 

I finally used up (or maybe threw out ) a bad spool of tan Danville 6/0 I use on caddis and hairs ear nymphs, it could take very little pressure but was old too. And the replacement spool that was in my tying box has been ok but I really don't think tan is their strongest thread for what ever reason.. I use it because it fits my caddis flies so well in color and size. Black caddis I tie with UTC 70.  Never had a problem with UTC 70 or with UNI 8/0, though the two threads act differently in capturing the materials and also how they rope up and or untwist to get Them flat again..  UTC is more floss like in nature but it captures bucktail and other hair fibers well in my experience.. Uni tends to be more rope like but you can put a lot of pressure on it in flaring deer hair or elk hair compared to Danville 6/0 IMO.. You can also untwist UNI to get it to be more flat, which I had not thought of till one day it was pointed out here by I think flytire. It was one of those "Duh of course" moments we experience along the way.. So simple once you see the light ( as in so many things).


John 7:38 ESV  is about "Rivers of Living Water"


#12 dflanagan

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 08:15 PM

Played around on a few classic wets tonight with the uni 6/0. It's definitely my technique that's causing the problem. Did fine until the head and then got carried away on a couple. One fly turned out great with a small head. The pic shows what happens when I lose track of number of turns.

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Tight lines,
David

#13 Dave G.

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Posted 03 July 2018 - 05:43 AM

Played around on a few classic wets tonight with the uni 6/0. It's definitely my technique that's causing the problem. Did fine until the head and then got carried away on a couple. One fly turned out great with a small head. The pic shows what happens when I lose track of number of turns.

Uni 6/0 builds very fast. Try 8/0, I think you will make out better and it's still more than strong enough. Uni 8/0 is nearly equal in size to Danville 6/0 and UTC 70 but IMO and experience doesn't fray as easy .. 6/0 Uni I would use on streamers and such in size 4 or larger. Also Uni becomes less rope like if you spin your bobbin counter clockwise a few times to open up the rope effect and have it lay a bit flatter as it wraps on the hook shank.. But really I think 8/0 Uni is your answer if to stick with uni ( you do seem to like that brand)...


John 7:38 ESV  is about "Rivers of Living Water"


#14 flytire

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Posted 03 July 2018 - 05:54 AM

yup you dont need 267 turns of thread to make a head :)

 

"UNI-Thread is a bonded thread that is reinforced with multiple binder strands that twist around the core strands at a much higher rate to produce the rounded shape. Because of that shape, UNI-Thread tends to build bulk vertically on the hook shank rather than horizontally as nylon threads do. The round cross section coupled with less stretch and a more textured surface
of this polyester thread allows for a bit more “bite” and “grab” to the thread in tying applications. Round thread bites into and flares hard hairs like deer, elk, and moose better than flattened thread does."

Read more: http://www.flyfisher.../#ixzz5KBhoBA5f


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#15 Dave G.

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Posted 03 July 2018 - 06:45 AM

Uni is not my favorite thread because of this round rope shape but it is good for tying Muddlers and other flies where spinning or flaring deer or elk hair is required ( I'm thinking of flared hair in Stimulators as well for instance). Though I have successfully tied my Muddlers and Stimulators with tan Danville 6/0 as well( have to be more careful tightening up), which is my weakest thread.. On my bucktail streamers that I tie in size 8 and 6 I like UTC 70 black, because on those I like the flat thread that doesn't cut deep into the bucktail and that helps the fibers lay back in streamer fashion....


John 7:38 ESV  is about "Rivers of Living Water"