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Does anybody still use....


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27 replies to this topic

#16 vicrider

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 12:09 AM

So the reason to use acetate floss is that when hit with acetone it melts into a smooth shell? Hundreds of videos I've watched and not seen the technique used yet. Will try a search but I use acetone to clean up around the table.

 

edit...One nice thing about Google is ask and you shall receive. I asked for acetate floss fly tying and after looking at a few of them it does make a nice, smooth hard shell type of finish for the chronomids and nymphs I saw tied. Don't know as it would look a whole lot different in the water as the same tie done with silk thread or floss and coated with UV.



#17 flytire

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 03:47 AM

here is the video that piqued my iterest and raised the question

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=DnJFmrazIRg


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#18 DarrellP

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 06:40 AM

I have tried to use on steelhead fly bodies. My fingers kept roughing it up and I couldn't get a smooth layer. Never used acetone. May try it.
"Calling fishing a hobby is like calling brain surgery a job." John Geirach

#19 Swamp Fly

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 09:37 AM

  Interesting technique, thanks for bringing this up.  How long before the treated floss gets hard enough so you don't mar the body or dull the shine?



#20 flytire

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 10:01 AM

i learned about acetate floss back in the 1980's when i first started tying flies. might have been more popular back then

 

i do not know how long it takes to dry or harden after you remove the fly from the acetone bath :)


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#21 mikechell

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 11:55 AM

As I see it, Acetone has a very quick evaporation rate.  Given the same quantity, it only takes seconds to vaporize where water would take more than 10 minutes.

BUT ... the outer layer vaporizes first, leaving a shell that greatly slows down the rest of the solvent's ability to escape into the air.

 

Remembering my sisters (4 of them) and the amount of time they'd sit and wait for their fingernails to "dry" ... I'd say you'd be good to set the fly aside for 3 to 5 minutes.


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#22 Mark Knapp

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 12:12 PM

Interesting video. This technique looks like it would fit in well with many of the flies you like to tie, Norm.

 

I just took a quick look at all my floss. I got it all from buying out estates and things like that so, as you might expect it's a hodge podge of a bunch of different things. There's silk, rayon, nylon, and some acetate. Unfortunately, the labels have come off of many of my spools and some of them did not say what kind of floss they are. It just says "floss"

 

I suppose I would need to dip the ends of each spool into acetone to see if any of the mystery flosses are acetate.

 

In all my other dealings with acetone it evaporates very quickly and I suspect it will be no different with the acetate floss. I think it will be dry almost immediately. I'll give it a try tonight and let you all know what happens.



#23 Swamp Fly

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 01:41 PM

Those where my thoughts, it might take a bit for the acetate to not be gooey.  Shouldn't really be an issue, just curious.

 

Swamp



#24 SilverCreek

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 02:45 PM

Haven't used it in years... We used to do the nose ends of tarpon flies with it - then simply dip the ring end of a hook in a bottle of acetone and place a single drop of acetone on the floss to melt it into position.  It was a  quick and dirty way to finish less expensive flies when I was just getting started tying commercially.

 

Acetate floss ants are made like that.

 

Also bleeding chironomid patterns.

 

https://flyguys.net/...chironomid-pupa

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=iAdWWZyEfcQ

 

Also other bodies treated to acetone to melt the floss like this caddis pupa

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=HspHMr1-pWU

 

Other patterns

 

https://thethirstytr...tate-floss.html


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#25 troutguy

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Posted 27 October 2019 - 11:06 AM

There was a huge Hoechst Celanese plant was in Rock Hill, SC. It smelled like vinegar from time to time. They made acetate fiber. 

 

I have quite a bit of old Herters floss. I used to have the can of nymph solvent too. The colors are still better than today. Even treated, the floss developed a translucence when wet that you don't see with new materials. 


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#26 Capt Bob LeMay

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Posted 27 October 2019 - 11:39 AM

The way we used it back in the seventies/early eighties was to tie up a tarpon fly, whip finish the thread to end the tying- leaving the hook shank bare from the collar to the hook eye.  After all the tying portion was completed with the fly still in the vise you quickly wrapped the acetate floss forward and with it still under tension hit the floss with acetone.  A long shank hook's ring eye was dipped into the acetone bottle then quickly applied to the floss once or twice (or however many times needed) which melted right through the end of the floss you were holding - leaving a finished fly.  If desired, once the acetone evaporated (in seconds...) that area was dry enough to accept a coat of Sally Hansen's clear nail polish and you were done... 

 

I still have that "tool" we used to apply the acetone - it works on the same principle as the little plastic tool a kid dips into a bubble making solution, then blows floating bubbles with.  The ring holds just enough acetone to melt the floss with no excess to deal with... NOTE:  we never ever touched or tried to manipulate the floss until after the acetone had evaporated away and the floss area was completely cured out....


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#27 cphubert

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 12:41 PM

used it for steamer bodies for trolling flies, made a very durable fly that held its color. Haven't used it in a long time. Still have a  spool of red. Once found a cheap supply from Christmas ornaments acetate floss wrapped around Styrofoam balls(red and green) 



#28 Mark Knapp

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Posted 28 October 2019 - 02:51 PM

I went through all of my spools of mystery floss to see if any of it was acetate and to my surprise, out of about 50 spools quite a bit of it was. Some of the spools were labeled as to what kind of floss they were but most of them were not, they were just marked "floss". Some of them were missing the labels all together.

 

I tested some of the spools marked "rayon", "nylon" and "silk" so that I could rule them out. None of them melted in acetone so I surmised that anything that did melt in acetone must be acetate.

 

Here are all the flosses that melted when I dipped them in acetone.

 

DSCF4171-X2.jpg

The interesting thing is that some of the flosses from Universal Vise did melt in acetone and some did not, and there was no indication on the cards as to weather they were acetate or not.

 

When I was doing the testing, I found that the acetate dried very quickly (like in seconds) and the floss was not gooey at all after the acetone dried. The acetone didn't bother me at all but I understand that fumes from solvents can effect people differently, YMMV.