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Albino Golden stone nymph!?

spring creek stonefly species

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11 replies to this topic

#1 leftyangler

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:04 PM

My bug collection goes on. It's been fun. 

Today I found this unique color Stonefly nymph. As in my last topic, there are abundunt of Golden Stone nymphs in Livingston's spring creeks. Attached File  P2200873.JPG   61.32KB   102 downloads

Attached File  P2200877.JPG   74.99KB   91 downloads

 

Whole appearance was on Golden (size & shape). But is this albino? or a new species?

I just thought interesting anyway......

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#2 EricF

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 06:32 AM

In Eric Leiser's book Stoneflies and the Angler, he talks about how when stoneflies (and other insects) molt they are often light colored.  They then color up later.  He talks about how fish often key in on that light color and he ties white or cream stonefly nymphs to match it and how successful that is.  I do as well - altho it is unclear to me how much the success is do to the fact that the fish keys into it or that I can see it in the water so well.  Anyway, my current favorite is a gold ribbed possum's ear (a joke, possums don't have hair on their ears).  But the hair on their face is a beautiful translucent cream. 

 

Mebbe that is what you got ...

 

E



#3 sandflyx

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:08 AM

Yep a golden in the molting stage.


sandfly/bob

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"I TIE FROM BILLFISH TO GUPPIE FLY'S" !
Fly Fishing and Tying Ghillie


#4 leftyangler

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 12:02 AM

Thanks anglers. 

I myself "googled" and found this article of my tying hero Jack Gartside.

http://www.jackgarts..._filter_fly.htm

As EricF mentions, Eric Leiser is quoted here too. It's stating just about the same (I believe). 

It's quite educational to me, starting from just a bug. I should tie some "albino flies" for several species and experiment! 


Lefty Angler & Tyer
Satoshi Yamamoto - Livingston, MT

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Online Fly Catalogue

Tying Videos at YouTube https://www.youtube....low=grid&view=0


#5 riffleriversteelheadslayer

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 12:17 AM

White stoneflies are great fish catchers also light colored crawfish work well for bass


"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".--Thomas Jefferson

 

There is no such thing as a blank day for a fisherman. It will be saved for him by the white-throated weasel, who watches his fishing from a hole in the wall under which is lying a fish that refused all flies; or by the excitment of identifying insects; or by the apple-bloosom in a nearby orchard; and no one would call that day a blank on which he has seen a king-fisher." -- Arthur Ransome Rod and Line, 1929

 


 

 

 


#6 DUBBN

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 10:00 AM

That would be the instar portion of the moult. The nymph can be White to a bright shade of Yellow for a short time. It is my opinion that most Golden Stone patterns duplicate this stage of a nymphs life cycle than any other stage.

 

I have zero evidence of this. Just a hunch. 



#7 Flyunder

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 09:22 PM

I tie and fish a creamy/very lite tan stonefly nymph, yes it works pretty good. Good enough to tie and fish some. Great find by the way.


May your thread never fray...


#8 sandflyx

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 09:15 AM

stonefly molt;

Attached File  9-24-2010 082.jpg   36.74KB   20 downloads


sandfly/bob

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N.J.B.B.A. #2215
fly tying and fishing instructor/shop owner

"I TIE FROM BILLFISH TO GUPPIE FLY'S" !
Fly Fishing and Tying Ghillie


#9 Piker20

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 06:51 PM

when saltwater crabs, edible, velvet and swimming, molt, they release a pheromone fish home in on. Bait guys call them peeler crabs. (cause the shells peel off) Maybe hard backed nymphs also release a smell that turns fish on???
Matthew 25: 35-36 "Out of every 100 men, 10 shouldnt even be there, 80 are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior and he will bring the others back. "No man ever steps in the same river twice"   Heraclitus, 5 B.C

Based Scottish Highlands. UK

MUSTAD The wise anglers choice.

#10 JSzymczyk

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 06:01 AM

That would be the instar portion of the moult.

 

Sorry dubbn you are using the term incorrectly.  "Instar" refers to the entire period from change-to-change.  In other words, a First instar larva is first instar from the time it emerges from an egg until it moults the first time.   A Fourth instar larva would be from the time it has moulted the third time until it moults the fourth time.  Final instar, for a stonefly, is from the time it moults the last time into a larger nymph until it exits the water and moults into an adult. 


the gales of November remembered...


#11 bad fish rising

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 07:48 AM

I found this exact bug in the big manistee river along with some big blacks.
I couldn't believe the body differences between the 2.
the blacks were rounder like most of my flies but the gold was flat like a woven fly.
also they were much longer than my flies.
I was using 2xl hooks but now have switched to 3xl.
BADFISH RISING

#12 DUBBN

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 06:45 AM

That would be the instar portion of the moult.

 

Sorry dubbn you are using the term incorrectly.  "Instar" refers to the entire period from change-to-change.  In other words, a First instar larva is first instar from the time it emerges from an egg until it moults the first time.   A Fourth instar larva would be from the time it has moulted the third time until it moults the fourth time.  Final instar, for a stonefly, is from the time it moults the last time into a larger nymph until it exits the water and moults into an adult. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instar

 

I stand corrected.







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