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Emerger Hooks: Fine vs 1X Fine


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17 replies to this topic

#1 Randyflycaster

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 08:42 AM

I tied some simple emergers, but they didn't float or stay near the surface. I used fine emerger/nymph hooks; so I'm wondering if 1X fine would be different.

 

Also, what are the finest/lightest emerger hooks?

 

Randy



#2 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 09:03 AM

What hook did you use?

What emerger pattern did you tie?



#3 Cold

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 09:36 AM

.



#4 Randyflycaster

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 12:18 PM

The pattern I used was similiar to an RS2, except that I used CDC for a wing and Z-lon for a shuck.

 

Maybe I should use parapost material for the wing and shuck.

 

The local fly shop suggested I treat the CDC with CDC oil. I'm not sure if I oil the feathers once and let them dry or if I have to reapply the oil when I'm fishing.

 

Thanks,

 

Randy



#5 SilverCreek

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 12:43 PM

CDC "oil" actually clumps the fine fibers and prevents the flotation of CDC. What I recommend is not CDC oil but Tiemco Dry Magic which does evaporate without clumping and then use the combination drying crystals and floatant powder like Shimazaki Dry Shake or Loon Outdoors Top Ride.

 

http://globalflyfish.../tying-with-cdc

 

calc_feather-2-3-w556.jpg

 

"If you can maintain the feather's structure, the surface area of the barbules in the film works to keep the fly afloat and the tiny air bubbles retained in the ribbon-like, kinked structure of the hydrophobic barbules hold up those barbs that have broken through the surface film.

 

A closer look at the makeup of a CDC feather shows why applying a liquid or paste floatant collapses the feather structure and ruins the characteristics of the feather that help it float."

 


Regards,

Silver

"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

http://tinyurl.com/lgkbu7v

#6 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 01:41 PM

Try some Frogs Fanny or Doc's Dry Dust with the CDC.

 

Oh, and don't be stingy with the CDC on your patterns.



#7 Randyflycaster

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 02:33 PM

I've tried Frog's Fanny, but the problem is, if I remember, I have to keep applying it when I'm fishing.

 

Randy



#8 Cold

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 02:46 PM



#9 Randyflycaster

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 02:53 PM

I've been educated, though I still don't understand why CDC is such a great material for dry flies and emergers. For me, if I have to keep treating a fly or drying it off I'm not sure it's worth the effort, especially when I find parapost material floats like a cork.

 

Also, when I fish I hate frequently changing flies.

 

Randy



#10 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 03:08 PM

Absolutely, after catching a fish you will have to rinse off the fly (de-slime), dry off (I just smush it against my cotton t-shirt) and re-apply a coating of "dust" It only takes a minute to complete the process needed to attend to CDC. When you are dry fly fishing slowing things down can be an advantage.

You will also have to re-apply the dust after a period of time as the fly begins to absorb too much water. Again, not a big deal, just press against your shirt and re-apply the dust.

 

The dust is great stuff for drying out a fly, even a hackled version.

 

The CDC fly is unique in that hackle is not necessary to float the fly. However you can also use hackle with the CDC, but there will be times that the CDC alone is what the fish will eat over a hackled fly.

In that case it "is worth the effort".



#11 SilverCreek

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 03:40 PM



I've been educated, though I still don't understand why CDC is such a great material for dry flies and emergers. For me, if I have to keep treating a fly or drying it off I'm not sure it's worth the effort, especially when I find parapost material floats like a cork.

 

Also, when I fish I hate frequently changing flies.

 

Randy

 

No material that is ABOVE the water can help FLOAT a fly. All material ABOVE the meniscus ADDS MASS and helps SINK the fly. What lighter material does is reduce the mass that needs to be supported by the menicus but it can NEVER float the fly.

 

Only material ON or UNDER the film can float the fly. Material ON the meniscus such as parachute hackle spreads the weight of the fly on the meniscus can float the fly. Foam or other material such as cork with a specific gravity less than water can float a fly. It floats the fly by being submerged and displacing the mass of water that is equal to the mass of the fly, including the portion of the fly above the water. So parapost material cannot float a when it is ABOVE the water as a visible post. Plus its specific gravity is not that much less than water. Polypropylene has a specific gravity of about 0.92 so it is slightly less dense than water. Cork has a specific gravity of about 0.25 so it can float 7.5 times the mass that polypro can.

 

The reason that CDC is such a great material is that the filamentous mature of CDC gives the impression of a solid shape such as an emerging wing without adding as much mass above the water as other materials. What the hydrophobic floatant powder does is repel water so the air bubbles trapped by the CDC continue to displace water when the CDC dips under water and it keeps the CDC dry.

 

See this test in which the hydrophobic powder floatant (Shimazaki Dry Shake)  supports more mass than the other floatants.

 

http://troutster.com...-floatant-test/

 

The hydrophobic powder actually repels water and it can float a bead head nymph.

 


Regards,

Silver

"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

http://tinyurl.com/lgkbu7v

#12 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 04:09 PM

 I use Frog's Fanny for the final drying of the CDC fly but first I do this & it works very well:

 

https://thelimpcobra.com/2014/04/11/drying-off-flies-with-a-rubber-band/

 

Always quit when you're through.


#13 Randyflycaster

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 05:44 PM

Thanks again for all your help. How often should I apply Frogg's Fanny to a CDC emerger?

 

Randy



#14 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 06:39 AM

Definitely after every fish. After that it will be up to you to determine when by observing if the fly floats as it should. If a false cast or two does not dry the fly to float properly then it is time to re-apply.

If I am not constantly drowning my fly in heavy water, I can get many drifts out of a freshly dusted fly.



#15 Cold

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 07:59 AM