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Small Creek Fishing with the New 2019 Redington Butterstick

Flyfishing redington Butterstick brook trout brookies fishing creek brook

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#16 McFlyLures

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Posted 27 September 2018 - 08:27 PM

Mike, Im not laughing at all. Your all good bro. Different game. Trout fishing is way way different! Believe me. I fished saltwater and bass for many many years and when I moved to the mountains, trout were mostly all there was. And it took a while to get it down. Completely different game for sure. I do miss the fights down to backing from redfish for sure! Haha.

Not sure why a strip set doesnt work, but it really doesnt on trout. Ive tried. Haha

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#17 redietz

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Posted 27 September 2018 - 09:16 PM

You guys are laughing at strip setting the hook, and I don't understand that.

The problem with small fish is that they can be pulled with the fly.  Rather than setting the hook, you just pull the fish through the water as it holds tightly onto the fly.  Next thing you know, it's gone and you never slacked the line.  Actually, the fish just opened it's mouth.

Strip setting is more likely to get the hook point into flesh.

 

No.  The "God save the Queen" referred to above is advice given to salmon fishermen, where we might be talking 30 pound fish.  The problem isn't because of the size of the fish, but because of the size of the fly.  

 

Do this thought experiment:  float a small dry fly and and a Rapala crank bait on the water.  Now try to grab each from underneath.  (I'm saying thought experiment because of the hooks. Probably not a good idea to actually try it.) You'll have no problem picking up the crank bait, but when you try to close your hand around the fly, the action of closing your finger will squirt the fly away from your hand. If you're ever tried to pick up a small bug from the water, you know this is true.

 

Fish have the same problem.   They can't swim up to an insect and close their mouths around it; it would just squirt away.  Instead, they flare their gill and suck the bug in, kind of like drinking through a straw.  They start this sucking action starts well before the bug has got to them.  If you try to strip set, you can easily pull the fly away from the fish before it even gets to their mouth. ( I've witnessed this at very close range before, where I can feel the tug, and the rod tip bends well before the fish has the fly.) If you're fishing downstream on the swing (the line being tight) you're going to miss the fish every time if you strike immediately or too hard.  This is regardless of the size of the fish; in fact it's probably worse on bigger fish since they start sucking from further away. (Paul Schullery's book The Rise has some interesting photos of the phenomenon..)  This is why a rod with a soft tip is an advantage when fishing on the swing -- it allows the fly to reach the fish.

 

As McFlyLures pointed out, this doesn't really apply to large streamers; fish can grab them just the same as you can grab the Rapala in the thought experiment above.


Bob


#18 chugbug27

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Posted 27 September 2018 - 10:47 PM

Re the OP's issue, though, sounds more like it's either educated trout at the end of a busy summer, or throwing dry flies when they're after emergers or rising nymphs, or possibly throwing visible Caddisflies or mayfly imitationslwhen they're after midges, something more like that
cb27

#19 redietz

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Posted 27 September 2018 - 11:06 PM

Re the OP's issue, though, sounds more like it's either educated trout at the end of a busy summer, or throwing dry flies when they're after emergers or rising nymphs, or possibly throwing visible Caddisflies or mayfly imitationslwhen they're after midges, something more like that

Very likely.  I just found it quite a coincidence that it should happen to me both times out with the rod, and then the first report I read on line about the rod mentions the same thing.


Bob


#20 McFlyLures

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Posted 28 September 2018 - 05:32 AM

Yeah chug, actually your assessment is spot on. Educated trout for sure! I threw on some emergers and it didnt help, and the 2nd day was phenomenal. Probably 40+ fish. But I had to hike 3-4 miles back, where the fish werent pressured. My buddy who fished that creek a lot, said it was the hardest fishing he had seen. And usually the fish more readily take the dry. However fishing around this area has been tough, we recently had a large fire, and then heavy rain. Which washed ash into 3-4 of our more popular rivers and creeks. It killed off many fish, which sent more people up to these back country creeks in search of fish. So, I think your right, the fish were pressured and therefor not as aggressive with taking the fly.

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#21 FIN-ITE 34

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Posted 28 September 2018 - 05:54 AM

My comment for the "GSTQ" delay was for down stream casts and takes. In that situation you have to wait for the fish to turn on the take, otherwise you will pull the fly out of the fishes mouth before you can set the hook.

That being said, I find that while fishing small creeks, of which I do a lot, that the size of the fish coupled with the size of the fly has an impact on my hookup percentage. Most times I'm fishing some full and easy to see fly in the hard to see light of a hemlock ravine. A size 14 Ausable Bomber or Humpy is not the easiest fly for a small fish to close its mouth around and you have to expect a goodly number of missed fish.

 

And as for a strip set? That's not going to happen with a 5 or 6x tippet, as even a 6" trout will cause a fairly good number of broken of flies in their mouth. Besides that, a fine wire, barbless dry fly hook does not require much pressure to sink the point. A slight lift of the rod tip is all that is required.

 

I do however use the strip set exclusively when fishing with a heavy leader for pike, stripers and bluefish where a stout hook requires a ton more pressure to bury a, yes Mike, barbless 6/0 hook.







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