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62 replies to this topic

#31 Peterjay

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 01:44 PM

Wow! Plonsky's pix are enough to make me consider spending the rest of my life indoors with a can of Raid in every room.

#32 Will Milne

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 07:52 PM

Speaking of Insect closeup/macro-

someone I have admired for a while- a wonderfull balance of lighting/technique and subject matter:) He has recently branched off into different subject matter equally as engaging:)

Igor S

Will

#33 Graham

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 10:01 AM

Thanks for the link Will, Igor's images are pure art, gorgeous work, and very inspirational. I found Igorís website very interesting, although I can't read Polish, the photos of his camera and custom flash setups are intriguing. Thanks again, it was a treat admiring his work.

Graham

#34 flyrod98

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Posted 25 September 2007 - 09:29 PM

This is a good link to some astrophotos by Jerry Lodriguss Catching The Light
In his Show Case Gallery he has an image showing the shadow of the Space Station on the surface of the sun with an explanation of how he took the image. The image also appears in the Nov. issue of Sky & Telescope.

This link is to a depth of field calculator. It has a free download for the calculator. Might be useful for macros.
Depth of Field Master




William M
35yrs walkin' + 36 yrs rollin' => 1 Really old fart.
I'd Rather Be Wadin' Than Rollin'

#35 Peterjay

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Posted 26 September 2007 - 09:30 AM

Great site flyrod - I love that stuff. But I believe the image of the ISS is the station itself transiting the sun rather than a shadow.

#36 Graham

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Posted 26 September 2007 - 11:55 AM

I'm really not sure where to post this, but this Sunday Sept 30th I'll be at the Orvis store in Pasadena demonstrating realistic tying and doing a presentation about outdoor and bird photography. I don't think anyone here is located close enough to visit, but I would very much enjoy meeting FTF members and lurkers... It will be fun...

Graham

http://www.orvis.com...sp?subject=3357



#37 Mokai

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Posted 26 September 2007 - 12:57 PM

Here is a link to a tutorial on how to do Border Breakout in Photo Shop

Link

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#38 flyrod98

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Posted 26 September 2007 - 06:36 PM

QUOTE(Peterjay @ Sep 26 2007, 08:30 AM) View Post

Great site flyrod - I love that stuff. But I believe the image of the ISS is the station itself transiting the sun rather than a shadow.


Right you are. I'm not sure if it would be possible for it to be a shadow.
William M
35yrs walkin' + 36 yrs rollin' => 1 Really old fart.
I'd Rather Be Wadin' Than Rollin'

#39 Peterjay

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Posted 27 September 2007 - 08:41 AM

If you like B&W landscapes, you might want to check this guy out. He does some really nice work.

http://www.chipforelli.com/

#40 Graham

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Posted 27 September 2007 - 08:05 PM

Thanks for the link Peter. Chip has such a diverse portfolio, it's truly astonishing. After admiring the various artistic Intrinsic Landscapes I assumed I wouldn't have much interest in the Industrial Landscapes, but I was wrong. Some people have a natural talent to make the dull and oridinary captivating and beautiful. And I haven't even looked at the Inhabited Landscapes yet. I don't know what is is about B&W that makes it such a beautiful and artistic medium? But I know I like it, a lot.

Graham

#41 KVRNut

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Posted 27 September 2007 - 09:17 PM

Frans Lanting ( http://www.lanting.com/ ) has some interesting techniques for lighting that he touches on in this section of his website. http://www.lanting.com/phototips.html I find myself re-reading and studying his photography a lot.
His "Life: A Journey Through Time" ( http://www.lifethroughtime.com/ ) first drew my attention to his work and his versatility as a photographer.

Ernie
If you truly love Nature, you'll find beauty everywhere.
Vincent Van Gogh

#42 Peterjay

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Posted 28 September 2007 - 09:57 AM

Ernie, thanks for the heads-up on Lanting. I think I may have to buy that book.

Graham, I'm not sure I understand the appeal of B&W either, but I know that the medium forces me to think creatively in a way that color doesn't a lot of the time.

Here are a couple of guys that I look to for inspiration. (as do a lot of people) Michael Kenna's Japanese images are always a reminder that you don't have to be fancy to be good. Peter Miller's photogravure prints just knock my socks off every time I see them, and I keep going back to them over and over.

http://www.michaelke...aido/index.html

http://www.kamprint.com/



#43 Graham

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Posted 28 September 2007 - 10:10 AM

Thanks again Peter. This is my favorite thread becasue I had never seen the web pages for these photographers before, and I very much enjoy viewing their work. Mr. Lantings work is beyond words, at least for me it is, I just cant explain how much I enjoyed admiring his photos last night. And the page about using flash for landscapes and wildlife was fascinating.

About the B&W... I haven't been to many art shows, but one I went to in Laguna Beach this summer featured a number of photographic works, and I noticed that most were black and white. I've also started to notice that the majority of non-family photos in peoples homes are B&W. Very interesting...

#44 KVRNut

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Posted 28 September 2007 - 09:50 PM

I'm going to try experimenting with the flash when I take some sunset pics and have things silhouetted. Wish I would have had one with me when I took those lakeside shots I posted. Think the results would have been radically different.

I think the appeal of B&W is seeing things that you don't see when one takes a color photo. Things are more apparent, detail can be higher, and there can be a lot of feeling in a B&W photo that's hard to convey in color.

Ernie

If you truly love Nature, you'll find beauty everywhere.
Vincent Van Gogh

#45 Frogfish

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 05:13 PM

Todd and Brad Reed Photo

http://www.toddandbradreed.com/

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