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New old vise


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Gene L

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 09:47 PM

I like old vises.  Recently, I came across this one pretty cheap....it's a Universal 2 rotating vise, probably from the 60s?  It's similar to the Thompson C as it's a draw collet vise activated by a wheel, but it rotates.  I wanted a Universal 1, which seems to be a better vise in a Steampunk sort of way, after watching classic fly tier use his on You Tube.  The 2 is cast iron, simpler, and probably a cheaper vise.

 

The vise I got I think was unused.  I cleaned it up (there's a video on You Tube of a guy cleaning a 2) and it works pretty well.  After I cleaned it, I tested it down to a size 16 dry hook, and it held it sufficiently well, so that's good.  It also rotates if you pull the knob in the center of the vise head.  Not the rotating  vise of choice but classic in it's own way.

 

Anyway, here is one just like it. 

 

Universal-2.jpg



#2 fshng2

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 08:50 AM

Nice.
FYI some universal vise history, talks about all 4 vises.
http://www.mtfa-spri...ly-tying-vises/

#3 xvigauge

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 11:11 AM

Great find. I love new old stuff. I have lots of fly rods and fly reels that fit into that category, but no vices (I guess that comes from clean living).

Joe



#4 flyty1

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Posted 28 August 2019 - 07:59 PM

The Universal 2 was my first serious vise..I still like the simplicity of this vise and the fact that it is a rotary vise.

#5 Gene L

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Posted 28 August 2019 - 10:57 PM

You got to really lock down on it to hold a 1/0 hook.  Every vise I own holds hooks better, but I'm drawn to the old ones.



#6 Gene L

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 10:13 PM

This post is a follow-up for anyone interested in using the Universal I, 2, or 3....if there is any interest.  If not, ignore, since it's not especially interesting or applicable to modern rotary vises.  I have a HMH TRV, which is in almost all respects a better true rotary, but I like the Universal 2 because it's old technology which I think is pretty good for its day.  I don't know why it didn't catch on.  Except maybe because there's less access to the tail of the fly unless you reposition the hook.  One advantage is you don't twist the thread when winding it if you do it right.

 

After using the vise for a few weeks and then reading the manual referenced above, I realized the cleaning instructions on the video on the linked video isn't exactly right. I followed the instructions for cleaning, but found the video displayed the final position of the jaws 180 degrees from brochure so it's not  on the same axis as the jaws.  You can;t rotate the jaws as the vise was originally designed.  Otherwise, essentially, you're tying on a stationary vise that is capable of being rotated, but not a true rotary.

 

You can control the position of the fly to examine it or for whatever reason,  if  without the O ring you apply pressure on the chuck with your off-hand to stop the rotation. I like the true-rotary, free spinning, hook-in-line with the axis of the jaws because you can really spin thread or body material on (like on a streamer) and there will be no wobble. Kinda like a Nor-vise in action. The video is good for cleaning and lubricating, but if you study the instructional brochure, you'll see how to properly place the hook so you can get more advantages of the true rotating vise.

 

If you watch the video to the end, he ties a jig, which is fine, but I see no advantages of using a rotary vise in this situation...it's like tying the jig on a stationary vise, which requires little or no movement of the jig.  But if you tie a streamer and want to wind thread and material (dubbing or yarn or ribbing) you'll be more satisfied with the free-spinning jaws.



#7 Poopdeck

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 06:23 AM

I got to admit you lost me in the description of what you were doing but I love old and I like your passion for old. Personally, I find rotating features, true or false, pointless. This is just me and I completely understand and respect those who can't live without rotation. More importantly, how does it hold the hook after all these years?

#8 Gene L

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 10:36 AM

It holds the hook adequately, it's a draw collet,  takes a firm hand with a larger hook.  I've only tied pretty large streamer hooks and a couple of poppers.  I have more non-true rotary vises than rotary, but after watching Classic Fly Tyer (or Tier) on Youtube, I wanted one of those vises and to be able to spin the thing.

 

If you go to the above-posted website, http://www.mtfa-spri...ly-tying-vises/, it has a link to the video of the guy cleaning the vise, but also has a copy of the brochure that went with the vise.  If you read the brochure, you'll see how to correctly place the hook to get true rotary. Watch the video of him tying the jig, and he's doing it just opposite. 

 

It was from watching the video that shows the vise head upside down that fooled me.  Admittedly, it gives better access to the tail end of the hook that way. I tied the first few flies like the guy on the video, and wondered what happened to the rotating function. Reading the brochure set me straight.

 

The vise is old, but I think it was unused when I got it, mainly because the back spacer, a nylon washer, showed to evidence of use.