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Hired by my local Fly Shop... advice needed!


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20 replies to this topic

#1 FlatsRoamer

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 06:33 PM

Ok guys, so really wanted to make sure this summer (job-wise) was much better than last year. Some of you may remember that it did not go well lol...

 

The Fly Shop of Miami decided to hire me and give me a chance, and I am truly grateful to them for that and everything else they have given me. They have also been buying my flies for over a year now, and have been patient when I wasn't as good at tying and taught me lessons when I needed it or messed up (lots of them). I really want to be good at this job, and I have spent enough time in the shop to know that it will get busy and I will be required to set-up a lot of reels, sell rods, offer advice about everything, call and make orders to companies such as Nautilus, maybe even some casting lessons here and there. Tying nights are also supposed to start up this summer, so I will be expected help with that and assist some of the beginning tiers that need help. 

 

Basically, I would really appreciate any help/advice you guys would be willing to share. I've made enough mistakes to know that by making them is the best way to learn, but as you could imagine, if I mess up too much then I could (and should) be fired. I've been tying and learning some new knots (like the Bimini) and refreshing myself on some that haven't used in a while. 

 

Also, if any of you guys ever swing by and I happen to be there (I'm 16 y/o... you'll know) make sure to introduce yourself and say hi!

 

Flats

 


Still hunting for my first tarpon on fly! 


Why are windknots in love with me?


Can't wait for that diy trip to Acklins!!

 

 

Find my youtube channel in the link below

 

https://www.youtube....plkVnmuDObYCLBg


#2 mikechell

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 06:51 PM

You don't need any help, Flats.  You've proven, already, that you have a better work ethic than 99% of kids your age.  That's the main ingredient in making a perfect employee.  Actually, a main ingredient in making a good person.

The second most important ingredient, is enthusiasm/curiosity.  Enthusiasm for what your doing, and curiosity to learn more ... hand in hand traits that will make any position you have more than just a job.

 

Good luck!


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#3 Rjohn7

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 07:00 PM

Half your battle is done, you're hired.  Sounds like you plan on putting in your best effort.  They already know you from the sounds of things, and obviously think you will be a great employee.  They know what they are looking for and what they want,  and (this is the important part)  think that you'll provide it.  But why ask here?  Ask there at work... after a week or so ask them what you can do to be the best at your job that you can be. 

 

R.



#4 flyty1

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 07:26 PM

Keep your customers very happy, keep your boss and fellow workers happy, and remember, you are being employed to work which sometimes is a fine line between servicing a customer and "hanging out" with them.

#5 tjm

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Posted 08 May 2018 - 10:02 PM

Follow their lead, do as asked, ask for clarification if uncertain and keep on doing what you already did that impressed them enough to put you on. Sounds as if you have done well already.



#6 islander727

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Posted 09 May 2018 - 03:08 AM

Congrats!



#7 rstaight

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Posted 09 May 2018 - 04:52 AM

You are going to be dealing with some real boneheads. But for the most part folks will be pleasant and a joy to help out. But either way, remember the golden rule. Do un to others as you would have others do un to you.

Just treat the guest with respect and curtisy. They came to you, it's a privilege.

The shop feels you have the basic skills and are trainable. Just prove them wright.

Congrates on the dream job.

"Scholars have long known that fishing eventually turns men into philosophers.  Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to buy decent tackle on a philosopher's salary." - Patrick F. McManus


#8 fishingbobnelson

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Posted 09 May 2018 - 10:19 AM

Don't ever hesitate, when you don't know the answer,  to say "I don't know, but I'll find out".  


“The thing about fishing is that it gives a man hope.  Each cast builds a little hope and if he can lose himself to that hope, then the worries and the heartache fade into the background.  The wind inside him dies down for a while”

The Royal Wulff Murders, by Keith McCafferty

 

Fishing Bob


#9 ihang10

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Posted 09 May 2018 - 12:47 PM

Engage the customers. If I dont get a friendly welcome I turn right around. My local fly shop is about 2 hours away, and because of the guys that run the place is why I shop there. They arent the cheapest, they arent even the closest, but from the minute you walk in, they are helpful and engaging.

I buy my feathers from a guy 16 hours away, and I see him 1-2x a year. Hes just a nice guy with a reasonable product. Its that easy.

#10 Poopdeck

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Posted 09 May 2018 - 07:28 PM

Know your place and stay in your wheel house. You were hired to take out the trash, sweep the floor and help with sales. I highly doubt you will be giving casting lessons nor should you unless you are in fact some kind of certified casting instructor. staying in your wheelhouse means you are a 16 year old kid who has very limited fly fishing experience so don't project yourself as a master fly caster, tier or anything other then a young man with his first job at the fly shop. You are in the first stages of building a resume. These things take time, patients and honesty. Good luck and enjoy. I hope it's everything your hoping it to be.

#11 DavidR

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 07:50 AM

I’ve worked part time for 2 fly shops ....if in doubt about something ask someone you work with to show you ... never assume anything about anything or any customer. Not all customers are right, but some need to feel like they are regardless. Before spending too much time with a customer, learn to qualify if they are a serious buyer ..for example plenty of people will come in just to cast rods with no real purchasing intent.

Older customers will see you are young and assume you can not know as much as them .... do not take it personally.

If you see something out of place, fix it, don’t wait to be told to do it.

Greet EVERYONE that comes through the door.

#12 mikechell

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 09:30 AM

Not all customers are right ...

But some ARE !!!  If you try to tell someone information you THINK is right ... and they KNOW it's not ... you've lost them forever.

When you first came on this site ... you set a lot of people's nerves on edge.  You tried to convince us you knew more than you did.

For the most part ... we've come to appreciate your drive and desire to do well in this sport/hobby/industry.  

Just remember, there ARE people who know more than you, and may ask questions to gauge your understanding.  If you don't know something, do NOT try to guess your way through it.  You might fool an amateur, but you'll drive away the experienced customers.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#13 tjm

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 04:26 PM

 

If you don't know something, do NOT try to guess your way through it.

x2



#14 Poopdeck

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 07:31 PM

Or worse, pass something along that you read on an Internet forum as personal knowledge, experience or gospel.

#15 FlatsRoamer

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 07:40 PM

Thanks for all the helpful advice, gents. I will definitely try and apply this when not if I get into a situation where I simply don't know something. Sounds like a good idea to not BS my way out of something and rather come honest and learn something in the process.

 

Poopdeck, that makes perfect sense. I'll try and stay in my "wheelhouse" lol. I remember one time I got a little "too cozy" and decided to sit in a chair behind the register/counter where only employees are allowed... safe to stay I haven't made that mistake again. 

 

Also, don't think that I'm taking this lightly, or as summer camp. I am an employee, and I will be professional (heck, might even wear a polo) and not childish or complain about stupid things. This is a job, and it motivates me even more that I am working for some of the best dudes I know, one of my favorite places, and definitely in the industry I am thinking about pursuing. I've already seen how doing a bad job/having a bad relationship with the boss can go south quickly (last summer), and am determined to not let that happen again. 

 

Thanks everyone!


Still hunting for my first tarpon on fly! 


Why are windknots in love with me?


Can't wait for that diy trip to Acklins!!

 

 

Find my youtube channel in the link below

 

https://www.youtube....plkVnmuDObYCLBg