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Photography


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27 replies to this topic

#16 TIER

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 09:29 PM

Ah ... I hate the computer camera on my laptop.  Since they're usually designed to give the best focus on your face, that's approximately how far the fly should be.  But then, when cropping or digitally zooming in, you'll likely lose some clarity.  As Chug stated, more light might help.

A fair digital, instant camera can be as little as $30.00.  It's what I use to take my pictures.

Can you use a Nintendo 3DS or a DSI?



#17 mikechell

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    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 09:55 PM

I don't know a thing about them.  All I can say is, you need to try something.  As it is now, it's hard to tell what your flies actually look like.  

Sorry, but they are just too blurry to see well.


Barbed hooks rule!
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#18 fshng2

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 10:18 PM

Yep just Googled...hope this helps.

 

https://en-americas-...d-take-pictures

 

Camera Modes Nintendo 3DS

https://www.youtube....h?v=pYSekq2_0_4



#19 flytire

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 05:54 AM

my take on fly photography

 

http://flytyingnewan...ography-my.html

 

photograph taken with a microsoft surface tablet. resized to fit the forum. not very good quality

 

pbr.jpg


The fish care less than we do!


#20 Al Beatty

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 08:15 AM

Hi group,

 

We've posted in years past that the very old Nikon 995 is the best macro camera made if all you plan to do is post pictures on the Internet. Unfortunately, it is only a 3.2 mp camera. It can be had of eBay (used) for around $25 to $30. A smart-phone camera is also good for posting pictures on the Internet. Use you finger to zoom in on the fly then hold your finger on the fly to make the auto aspect of the unit lock focus on the fly. Last, a DSLR with a macro lens is great and you can zoom in on the subject to manually focus on individual fibers if needed. After that, use lots of light. Take care & ...


Tight Lines - Gretchen & Al Beatty
www.btsflyfishing.com

#21 Capt Bob LeMay

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 01:09 PM

Here are the two simple things that greatly improved my closeup photography... I long ago started writing small articles and really needed sharp, clutter free pics.

The first was a modest tripod... you'll have real difficulty getting sharp clear close pics without one (and then use your timed shutter release so that you're not even touching the camera when it fires).

The second tip requires a trip to a hobby or notions shop where you'll find 3mm colored foam sheets for craftwork. Buy as many different colored sheets as needed for perfect contrasting color backgrounds for your fly photos. Last time I bought them they were'nt much more than a buck each - so a bag full was pretty cheap... Those foam sheets, by the way are perfect material for making Gartside's Gurgler if not needed for photo backgrounds...

Set up your shot then take a few pics changing out the background colors... When you're done, compare the variations on your computer you.ll quickly see which one provides the best background for each picture...

Hope this helps, here's a pic or two to illustrate...

3UiTmwv.jpg

SgitLp0.jpg

CaGrjSg.jpg

Lhtfgu5.jpg

 

In each case I just tried several different background sheets until I found what I thought was the best contrast for the fly or knot I was trying to illustrate...


Tight lines Bob LeMay (954) 435-5666

#22 TIER

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 02:07 PM

Here are the two simple things that greatly improved my closeup photography... I long ago started writing small articles and really needed sharp, clutter free pics.

The first was a modest tripod... you'll have real difficulty getting sharp clear close pics without one (and then use your timed shutter release so that you're not even touching the camera when it fires).

The second tip requires a trip to a hobby or notions shop where you'll find 3mm colored foam sheets for craftwork. Buy as many different colored sheets as needed for perfect contrasting color backgrounds for your fly photos. Last time I bought them they were'nt much more than a buck each - so a bag full was pretty cheap... Those foam sheets, by the way are perfect material for making Gartside's Gurgler if not needed for photo backgrounds...

Set up your shot then take a few pics changing out the background colors... When you're done, compare the variations on your computer you.ll quickly see which one provides the best background for each picture...

Hope this helps, here's a pic or two to illustrate...

3UiTmwv.jpg

SgitLp0.jpg

CaGrjSg.jpg

Lhtfgu5.jpg

 

In each case I just tried several different background sheets until I found what I thought was the best contrast for the fly or knot I was trying to illustrate...

What was that last fly?



#23 Capt Bob LeMay

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 02:28 PM

My own wool head mullet fly on a Mustad 34007 1/0 hook. The dark brown is spun and clipped wool, the body is tan Dan Baileys Body Fur, tail is maribou blood quill with a neck hackle accent on each side curved in...
My anglers do well with these in winter around downed trees.
Tight lines Bob LeMay (954) 435-5666

#24 Charlie P. (NY)

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 10:07 PM

Is this a good picture? People say I need improvement on my photography skills. Also, is that a good coho fly?

 

Because I care . . 

 

Slightly out of focus.

 

Background makes it appear the fly is half as wide as a 18" +/- chair back.

 

Natural lighting (window) is behind the fly instead of behind the photographer.


   Not that Pearsall

 

Pearsalls_logo.gif


#25 The Mad Duck

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 06:23 AM

Your photography will improve IF:

Shoot against a solid background. A cluttered background will confuse the camera's focusing system.

Make sure the subject is well lit. That also helps the cameras focusing system.

Make sure there are no sources of light directly behind the subject. That also can confuse a focusing system AND, make a silhouette out of your subject.

 

Contrary to what someone said earlier, Your lens is the MOST important link in the camera system. The lens is what collects and adjusts light, tells the camera how and where to focus and a myriad of other functions. If you have a DSLR, always get the best glass you can afford. It pays off in the long run.

 

Lastly, Learn to use your camera. Don't set it on auto and expect great photos. Learn what shutter speed,iso and aperture settings do, and how they help you control the quality of your photos.


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#26 TIER

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 01:39 PM

www.flytyingforum.com/pattern14103.html
Is the picture in the pattern I just did good at all?



#27 utyer

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 09:48 AM

Not very good picture at all.  Which has been said before.  You CANNOT do good closeup images with the computer, or cheap cell phone cameras.  Get any digital camera with a "MACRO" focus button.  That button looks like a tulip.  You can find these with 3MP and with the macro focus, and plenty of light the camera can be within inches of the subject (fly,) and create a crystal clear image.  A tripod will help steady your camera, but if you shutter speed is over 200th of a second, it can still work as a hand held.  I don't have a tripod or a remote shutter trigger, and most of my images work out ok.  

 

The better point and shoot cameras all have these features, and also have aperture and shutter speed options.  Not really necessary, but nice to have.  I see the camera I now have on Amazon.com for over 400.  I found it by the side of the road, and it's been dropped on stone, to where I have to tape the case shut, but it still works just fine.

 

Your light source should be a DAYLIGHT lamp, and you can see the most complex "shadow box" I made,  Simply a clorox bottle with a window cut out to shoot through .  The lamps sends light through the cut out end.  I often use foam sheets to change the background color.  Darker sheets will often give you much slower shutter speeds, that can lead to blurry images since you will move the lense slightly.  

 

Always look at your viewfinder to see your shutter speed, and keep it above 200 (faster the better.)  

 

BEFORE you buy any camera, read the features, and make SURE you get the close up macro option.  Then READ the manual so you understand your camera and its features.  

 

 

 

 

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  • Lamp.JPG

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#28 Flicted

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 10:15 AM

I use an iPhone because it's what I have and I don't claim to be a high speed photographer like some of these guys.  Their photos are fantastic.  Much can be learned from these guys. But you can take much better pictures by making a few changes.

Light and background are key. Mount the fly on a vise, hackle pliers, wine cork, something to make it stand up. Use a desk lamp or other good light source to light up the fly. Hold your camera against something solid to keep it from moving when you "click". Don't zoom in, it will amplify any movement you make. I have better luck taking the picture from about 18-24" away and then cropping in the edit mode to zoom in.

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