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Started w/ a balanced hook, added body and tail, now not balanced!

balanced jig hooks

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11 replies to this topic

#1 SpokaneDude

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 01:05 PM

Started with a #10 jig hook, added pin w/ tungsten bead, and it's balanced.  So I added body (mohair) and tail (marabou) and now it's not balanced anymore!  Does it make a difference?  or should I add in the weight of the body and tail?

 

SD



#2 mikechell

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 01:22 PM

When you say, "... not balanced ...", how bad is it?  There will be some buoyancy to the material in the water.  Will you be jigging this directly under a float or boat?

 

On the other hand ... got a picture to make it easier for people to see a problem?


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#3 SpokaneDude

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 01:36 PM

Sorry, but I'm not very good adding attachments to my posts; this is a better image, although out of focus, but you can see the tilt... and yes, I'll be using it some distance from my 'toon.

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#4 flytire

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 03:34 PM

dubbing looks uneven from bend to bead. add more dubbing up front

 

tie another one that is slightly nose heavy. add a few wrap of lead wire behind the bead

 

move weight more forward or fish it as it is

 

is 3-5 degrees off really a problem?

 

i looked on google images and not all of them look perfectly horizontal


We do it all the time! Get over it!


#5 mikechell

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 03:39 PM

Looks like a large hook for the bead.  Again, the weight of the natural materials should be neutral in the water, so I don't think it'll be much of an issue.  For fishing, I also don't think the fish will turn it down because of a few degrees tilt to horizontal.


Barbed hooks rule!
My definition of work: Doing something in which effort exceeds gain.
Ex-Marine ... quondam fidelis
 


#6 chugbug27

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 04:10 PM

I don't really fish lakes or tie this pattern, but I'm guessing you're trying to tie a balanced "balanced leech"?

Assuming that's what you're looking for, here's a link for you from a great resource, with useful info and an SBS (click "tying instructions" under the main photo)

http://www.flyfishin...lancedleech.htm
cb27

"Fly tying is replete with unproven theories and contradictions and therein lies much of it's charm and fascination." George F. Grant, The Master Fly Weaver

#7 flytire

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 04:30 PM

wave motion and stripping in the line is going to affect the angle of the fly in the water. much ado about nothing

 

watch phil rowley tie one and his explanation on the head down profile

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=S_6sn7ooL80


We do it all the time! Get over it!


#8 Poopdeck

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 05:22 PM

Agree, a lot to do about nothing. first and foremost its going to follow the weight of the bead and the line and or current pulling/pushing on it. A little bit of off kilter dubbing is not going to change that. As I'm sitting hear I'm trying to wrap my head around what exactly "balanced" means for something that will be thrown in water where balance gets tossed right out the window and replaced with buoyancy and whatever aerodynamics is called underwater.

#9 SpokaneDude

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 09:04 PM

Thanks everybody for the input... I'll see how it goes next week, when I hope to give some of them a try...

 

SD



#10 Charlie P. (NY)

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 09:45 PM

If it is weighted at one end the material end will always follow the head because of drag in the water if there is any motion up or down going on.

 

I don't think the fish will care of the leech isn't exactly parallel to the surface.

 

Ever watch a leech swim?

 

https://youtu.be/MY3E_Cnq-8s


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#11 Bryon Anderson

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 12:25 PM

[quote ... whatever aerodynamics is called underwater.[/quote]

Hydrodynamics 🙂

"... trout do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience." -- John Voelker (aka Robert Traver), Testament of a Fisherman


#12 chugbug27

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 01:38 PM

watch phil rowley tie one and his explanation on the head down profile

 


Norm "nailed" it...
cb27

"Fly tying is replete with unproven theories and contradictions and therein lies much of it's charm and fascination." George F. Grant, The Master Fly Weaver