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Pontoon suggestion


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9 replies to this topic

#1 trout traveler

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Posted 28 December 2004 - 08:51 PM

Well being me when i had got my dryfly from Spentwing i was thinking........Don't try it hurts wink.gif .But the leg rest that most pontoons have after a day of casual floating or even long days find that my calves or the back of my legs get sore.A great add on would be either those foam insulators for wrapping pipie for winter or the ones the youngsters use to keep afloat.Take and wrap them around the leg rest.On some the bars are separated but mine is solid.

One help with comfort and on mine being a solid piece when ya stop you won't have a solid piece steel smacking your leg or the family jewels ohmy.gif .Just thought i throw that out there.

Anyone else have an ad on the find a little more convenant to help make the day go by........

tt
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#2 Shoe

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 07:54 AM

That pipe comes in pretty handy. Once you stand up, the boat can't float away laugh.gif

I missed that feature on my Skeeter. I ended up running a strap between the leg irons.
I know where they live, I know what they eat. Now it's time to fool them with thread, feathers and roadkill.

#3 Houdini

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 10:24 AM

Take a trip to your local bike store and look at handle bar wraps and covers.

#4 flytire

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Posted 31 December 2004 - 10:02 PM

Might be cheaper to dangle you feet in the water! biggrin.gif dunno.gif

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#5 flyfishtn

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 09:10 PM

I have mountain bike grips on my foot pegs which helps when your felt shoes are wet or you still have your flippers on.

On my Blue Heron from BPS, I have rope tied to two split ring key rings and string that between the two pontoons so that when I stand up in the water the toon can float back and not away. thumbsup.gif
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#6 Steelheader69

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Posted 05 January 2005 - 11:42 PM

Actually, I did some pretty big modifications to the outcasts I had. Similar stuff actually. I used the pipe insulation as mentioned. Had special rod holders that clamped to the frame (Cabela's sold them, now they're discontinued). Had special rod holders that bolted to the frame. Wish I still had pictures of the old boat, would post (including a retrofited anchor system).

That is a good idea about the strap. What I used near the footpegs was actually a bungi chord. It stretched tight across the frame by the footpegs, and didn't interfer with my feet resting on the pegs. Then, when I got out of the seat to fish, it would act as a shock absorber as I walked and fished.

Now, I use more whitewater grade pontoon boats. Alot more stable, and can stand up and fish. So I use them as mini driftboats instead of world class floattubes/kickboats. I have a 10' Steelheader Guide model with custom frame. And am looking at buying a Sotar Coho once I'm back to work. Both are more "small driftboats" then they are kickboats. Plus, when I'm not fishing, I can take them whitewatering. biggrin.gif Going to be custom building two new whitewater catarafts too once I'm back to work. Kids are almost old enough to go, and they both are excited to hit big water. biggrin.gif

#7 flyfishtn

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 10:15 AM

SH69, there are some good rod holders out there that clamp to the frame. I have seen the Scotty but never used it. Will investigate this Winter.

Also, I have oar rights on my oars from Dave Scadden and Oar Keepers - check out their accessories Dave Scadden Pontton Craft
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#8 Shoe

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 10:43 AM

Although some guys swear by oar rights, I don't like them. There are times when I "slice" the water instead of a full perpenticular stroke. Oar rights won't allow that. Not to mention while the oars are at rest they will sink deeper with the OR, instead of laying flat on the water without them. Most of the time that's not an issue, but during low flows it can be
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#9 flyfishenvy

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 11:35 AM

i have a rod holder from cabelas that straps around the tube itself.
user posted image

though i dont own the fly rod model, i do have the spinning rod one and below is what i have found with use of it.


there are some disadvantages to even this one though. first and foremost is that if you are traveling down a tight river with lots of brush and vegetation hanging over the banks it will only help you in getting your rod(s) caught up with them.

also, i put mine out front of me on my right pontoon, and found out that i would have trouble when i went to pick up the oars to back row, or to put them away after rowing. i am sure that is just a location thing, but havent been out on my boat in over a year to know for sure.

i didnt notice any wear on the straps that hold it to the tube as of yet. i used it maybe a half dozen times or so without any instances except those noted above



#10 Steelheader69

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 12:15 PM

flyfishtn, I know about the other rod holders. I actually worked a few International Sportsman Shows here in the NW for a cataraft company. I've seen the scotty's that clam to the railing. I'll probably end up buying some of those once I build my next couple customs or get a Coho. The nice thing about the ones I'm talking about is that they clamped literally ANYWHERE. I could even clamp them over the tube without putting any pressure on the tube itself (holds on the frame like a vise). Plus, could mount them in the rounds of corners of the tubes. Was nice.

Oar rights, that's tough actually. I ONLY use oarrights on my driftboats or smaller pontoons IF I'm running whitewater. Yes, I do run some heavier class 4's in my driftboat. The purpose of an Oarright is simply to keep your blade in proper position for you oarstroke (have to adjust it so it's cutting as you dig in). I actually use pin/clips mostly on my inflatables. Like an oarright on steroids. Only problem, you can't feather your oars with them. But I rarely do that in these boats anyways, since they don't track like a driftboat. One thing to do, that gives you the "oar right" feel, but gives you a chance to feather your oars (or simply change position of your oar stroke) is cut back most of the oar right. If you look underneath, you'll see segments. I normally cut back to the 2nd to last segment closest to the donut. What that does is gives you a positive oar lock if you need it and room to easily adjust the oars on oarstroke with minimal pulling of the oars. Seriously though, you don't need oarrights unless you plan to run heavy water. These boats really won't respond that well on a "row" if you're trying to move like a kayak or driftboat. Meant to go downstream and have yourself pulled with current on your oars, not pull against it (though can be done in slower stretches).

If you do use oarrights OR pin/clips, it's best to have a "floating blade". I only use cataracts (except in my driftboat, it came with Sawyer counterbalanced, they work so I use them). But the floating blade (I actually hate their magnum tips) will keep the blade floating on the surface. You don't want to stick an oar with an oarright or pin/clip in. There is no flex since the oar won't be rolling in the oarlock. So more likely of an "ejection" if stuck. Which leads me to my next tip. Always use oar tethers as well on these boats. May sound stupid, but something I've done for years (and have yet to lose an oar, even in heavy whitewater knock on wood), but are simple to make. Don't have to buy the $25 pairs from whitewater shops (though they are nice). Just get some heavy parachute chord and buy some heavy clips. Then, simply take the donuts for the oar (would be an oarright if you're using those) and either fuse it in the donut or make it so it'll cinch around the oar shaft. Now here's the kicker. You need to make the tether long enough it won't interfer with rowing, but will clasp around the oar tower (should wrap around and clasp back onto the tether itself) but will stop before it hits you. This way, if you do stick an oar (which will happen when rowing eventually), if the oar does eject you won't lose it. Next, the oar WILL NOT hit you. I know when I used to do some whitewater playdays, had a friend who had pin/clips that I had to pull out of the water. Didn't have his tethers on, and stuck an oar. Problem with pin/clips, when they are in, they are IN. Takes alot of pressure to get them to come off the pin (there is a small ball on top of the pin you unscrew to slide the clip off). If that oar comes out, it's like having a small missile come out at you. I've had quite a few "sticks" of the oar, and have seen the oar come at me, but stop before it hit me. Thankfully. LOL.

Actually, if you want boat accessories, go to http://www.nrsweb.com or http://www.cascadeoutfitters.com . I've been using both for about 20 years now (when I was still in high school with my first whitewater boats). I'm talking mostly accessories, not "fishing" stuff. Though you will find some fishing frames and such.