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Canoe or Kayak?


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19 replies to this topic

#1 cornmuse

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Posted 29 December 2004 - 01:38 PM

Nice addition to the forums, guys. headbang.gif

Here is a question I've always wanted to ask in a general way. Do you prefer fishing from a canoe or kayak and why? dunno.gif

I myself fish from a canoe. A 16' Mad River Malecite in Kevlar to be exact. I prefer the canoe to the kayaks I've paddled because its easier to get in and out of the canoe on the warmwater flows I typically fish. Also, the canoe give me leg room that I can't get in a 'yak. Also I like the ability to fish two people in the canoe.

I've fished sit-on-top 'yaks and like them a lot for certain applications. Where the 'yak is all about getting there, then getting out to wade, the sit-on-top was a winner for me. I used one in Florida on the St. John river (thanks Jerry) and really had a blast. Took a lot of nice bass, too.

I've fished sit-inside 'yaks and my knees ached for hours afterwards. Fun to paddle for a short time - and very maneuverable on fast water - but miserable in a pond IMHO. That said, my Malecite isn't a fast water boat. But then again, I don't fish fast water here in Ohio so my ride fits the road, so to speak.

Pontoon boats seem neat, I've not fished from one. When I've fished with others it does seem that they lack a bit of efficiency on the water. A 1/2 mile paddle in a pontoon boat seemed to be a lot more work than the same distance in my canoe.

Your experiences?

Joe C.
"Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit,
and resign yourself to the influences of each."
- Henry David Thoreau

Visit Fly Fish Ohio for great fly fishing and fly tying articles, the "Adventures in Fly Tying" monthly video podcast and the "Adventures in Fly Fishing" monthly audio podcast. The Midwest isn't a place you fly over to get to good fishing - it's right here in our own backyards.


Think globally - fish locally.

#2 Smuggler

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Posted 29 December 2004 - 02:00 PM

Hi Joe C biggrin.gif
Tricky question, my prefered float is a 15.5m Coleman Canadian Canoe. Lots of room and you can stand, kneel or sit to cast. Once I mastered an anchor system I got the fly on the water more. I also have the option to attach a Mincotta 40 for long tracks solo. It is managable on my own but I still need to be careful of conditions because you are sitting higher in the water.
In Ozzie there is the majority that prefer speed boats but the rest is spread over , canoe, float boat, float tube and drift rafting. I think it comes down to what water you regulary fish and that determines your craft.
Stay safe on the water and always wear a life jacket when solo.
Good hunting. blink.gif
Cheers
"Smuggler" ph34r.gif


Trevor Martin
Pro-Angler Geelong
22 Boundary Rd. East Geelong VIC 3219
Victoria Australia
Ph: (03) 5248 8338
Ph: (Int'l) 61 3 5248 8338
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www.proangler.com.au

#3 Sean Juan

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 08:38 AM

I love my yak.

Its the sit on type, and I use it primarily in the ocean.

Though comfort, fishability and what have you are largely subjective there is one catagory the kayak blows the canoe away in and thats safety.

I can be a mile out and tip the thing over, right it and go on fishing in five minutes without a second thought...in a canoe thats most likely a fatal accident.


F'ing the ineffable since 1974

#4 MIKE*A

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 10:06 AM

Most of my fishing has been out of a canoe.....I have an old beater 17' aluminium canoe. I have been looking for something smaller/lighter for going solo. I have borrowed a buddies sit-on-top and really enjoyed it. Much easier to get on/off than a sit inside, but not vey good in cold weather. I still haven't made up my mind small canoe or sot kayak. I will be very interested in everyone elses opinions on this.......

Sean, just curious, what brand/model yak do you use?

Mike

#5 getholdofjoru

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Posted 30 December 2004 - 11:55 AM

I have a 9'5 foot kayak rated for recreational use and you sit inside of it. They are very manuverable but you have to pack light, the only drawback to a kayak, but with a vest it is very manageable. Kayaks have one very noticable advantage to a canoe and that they are much easier to transport to the water.

----JGR----

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#6 lthrnk

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Posted 31 December 2004 - 08:26 AM

I have been using my two man sit in yak for 5 years and taken it to many different areas and types of water. As previously mentioned they are easy to transport, stable and as I usually sneak away and fish alone plenty of room for any and all equoipment and then some. Draws almost no water and stealthy, can creep right up on those pesky devils. The only problem I had was on the comfort level and not the yak but the life jacket. Hot and cumbersome, never fit or felt just right. Solved the problem by going to BassProShop and getting a Sospender unit. Worth every penny and makes it safer for you because it is comfortable and you will wear it.
GET OFF MY BACK!

#7 cornmuse

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Posted 31 December 2004 - 08:33 AM

QUOTE (getholdofjoru @ Dec 30 2004, 11:54 AM)
I have a 9'5 foot kayak rated for recreational use and you sit inside of it. They are very manuverable but you have to pack light, the only drawback to a kayak, but with a vest it is very manageable. Kayaks have one very noticable advantage to a canoe and that they are much easier to transport to the water.

That was a concern when I purchased my canoe, but the Kevlar construction tops out at 49lbs. Its pretty easy to shoulder it for up to 1/2 mile or so depending on the terrain.

The sit-on-top 'yaks I've fished from were all quite heavy - even more so after a bit of water got into them. Roto-molded plastic isn't very efficient for weight, but damn are those things tough!

Joe C.
"Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit,
and resign yourself to the influences of each."
- Henry David Thoreau

Visit Fly Fish Ohio for great fly fishing and fly tying articles, the "Adventures in Fly Tying" monthly video podcast and the "Adventures in Fly Fishing" monthly audio podcast. The Midwest isn't a place you fly over to get to good fishing - it's right here in our own backyards.


Think globally - fish locally.

#8 Peddler

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 09:15 AM

QUOTE (cornmuse @ Dec 29 2004, 01:38 PM)
Pontoon boats seem neat, I've not fished from one.  When I've fished with others it does seem that they lack a bit of efficiency on the water.  A 1/2 mile paddle in a pontoon boat seemed to be a lot more work than the same distance in my canoe.

Your experiences?

Joe C.

Sold my Mad River Kevlar Explorer several years ago and never looked back. I went with a 'toon for several reasons; #1 being control while fly fishing. I never have to put the fly rod down to gain or hold position, even in a breeze or mild current. The fins do the work. 'Toons also very rarely tip in the waters I fish. I am good at tipping a canoe, even in a farm pond! wacko.gif
All my gear is stashed in zipped bags right at my side, my rods are held in a rod/reel case and a pivoting rod holder mounted to the frame, it takes up very little room when disassembled (can stash the whole thing in the back of my Jeep and still have room for other stuff) and it has a neat, easy-to-use anchor system.

If I fished cat III or IV waters or the salt with creatures that bite back I would want the protection of wrapping my arse in fiberglass boat.gif

The downside is the speed. 'Toons aren't the swiftest creatures on the water but they are a lot quicker than wading!

#9 wayne SW/MO

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 05:24 PM

I have all three, SOT yak, canoe and a couple of pontoons. I haven't used my 'toons since I moved back to Missouri because I fish rivers more often than not.
I have a Tarpon 120 SOT that I fished up until warm weather set in and I would prefer it in cold weather and on unfamiliar waters. While its not as easy to get out of as the canoe, its better than a SIT yak. It has the advantage of being slightly more stable, is very close to being unsinkable and has plenty of storage for day trips. Its down side is weight. At 59 pounds it is a handful, but not as bad as it sounds.
My canoe is a Mohawk Solo 13 that I bought used this summer and it comes in at a trim 39 pounds. Its is easier to fish out of when I can't wade and easier to get out of when I can wade, its easier to reach things while afloat and is more manuverable than the SOT, but doesn't track as well. Its not as stable as the SOT because of the seating position.
They both move upstream against a current about the same, but the SOT probably has a very slight edge because of its tracking and its lessor wind resistance, which allows more power in the paddle to be directed towards moving forward. I use the same double bladed kayak paddle on both.
If I did more lake fishing or fished larger rivers, the 'toon would be right up there. I'm also pretty much limited to the more abrasion resistance of poly or one of the other plastic compounds.
Taney County, Missouri

#10 Troutman

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 11:22 PM

I haven't fished out of a yak (did paint the railing around a floating home from one though). I do like fishing out of a canoe and the fact that I can stand up in it to fish. I also like that I can carry enough stuff for a 3 or 4 day trip in the canoe.

Jim

#11 Sean Juan

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 12:04 PM

Mike,

I use a Cobra Fish n Dive

Its big, heavy and slow - but then again so am I.

I've had it for three years and I love it - at the time the market really didn't have much to offer big guys if I was buying today there are a lot more options available.

But it can carry 600 pounds I can get in and out of it in water thats over my head, it can't be swamped and I can right it if it flips in water over my head - but its never flipped when fishing and a lot of that was done in water and weather I had no business being in.

As for the cold factor, its no big deal if you are dressed right I wear waders and a dry top.


F'ing the ineffable since 1974

#12 Smuggler

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Posted 04 January 2005 - 04:36 AM

QUOTE (Sean Juan @ Dec 30 2004, 08:37 AM)
I love my yak.

Its the sit on type, and I use it primarily in the ocean.

Though comfort, fishability and what have you are largely subjective there is one catagory the kayak blows the canoe away in and thats safety.

I can be a mile out and tip the thing over, right it and go on fishing in five minutes without a second thought...in a canoe thats most likely a fatal accident.

Sean Juan biggrin.gif
Sorry, but you are wrong with the safety comment, my canoe is virtually unsinkable equiped with foam chambers and any capable user should be trained/able to turtle roll the canoe upright in overhead water. I was taught 25 years ago so its no newy. A PFD will at least float you.
The cold water is a different story hyperthermia is a bad animal and it does not discriminate what craft you ride in.
All craft have there draw backs none are perfect, thats why drownings happen.

Not having a go at you at all, but just needed to let ya know. We had the same debate in Oz. Not that many Canoe's here and the yakers, float boats,tubes etc etc etc had there preferences. dunno.gif

All comes down to the type of water you want to fish and stay safe. headbang.gif

PS gotta post to get rid of that baitfisher tag. wallbash.gif

Cheers
"Smuggler" ph34r.gif
Trevor Martin
Pro-Angler Geelong
22 Boundary Rd. East Geelong VIC 3219
Victoria Australia
Ph: (03) 5248 8338
Ph: (Int'l) 61 3 5248 8338
Email: [email protected]
www.proangler.com.au

#13 Steelheader69

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Posted 04 January 2005 - 04:47 AM

One thing to consider, since I've seen pontoons mentioned. The only time you truly want to consider a pontoon is if you're in still water with not alot of ground to cover or on rivers where you have water flow. These boats weren't designed to row like a canoe or kayak. They don't have a "cutting" hull for the water. So you'll be doing more pulling on the oars for every inch of water you push against. These boats were originally designed for running whitewater, and being maneuverable while doing it. So are used to be running with the flow. Whoever first decided to chop them down small should've changed a few things. They are better then a floattube though. Personally, I've rowed whitewater kayaks mostly (when I could fit my butt into them, not my fat butt probably won't lol), and some sea kayaks. Have rowed quite a few canoes. I think choice wise, I'd take a good solid canoe. I've seen the wider styles (think they're guide models, not sure). But have a wider footprint. You have more room to move. With the Kayaks, you're more set in your position. Unless you're talking some of the more open cockpit ones. The ones where you have straps you wrap your feet into. Plus, it's easier to push off and get out of a canoe vs. a kayak.

Really, best advice I could give, is find someone locally who has both (even if that means two people) and try them out. You won't truly find what you'll like until YOU try it.

#14 Smuggler

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Posted 04 January 2005 - 05:02 AM

So true and well said Steelheader69

Cheers
"Smuggler" ph34r.gif

ive_been_ripped.gif ripped: that tag is still there
biggrin.gif I take that back I will take the beginner tag yahoo
Trevor Martin
Pro-Angler Geelong
22 Boundary Rd. East Geelong VIC 3219
Victoria Australia
Ph: (03) 5248 8338
Ph: (Int'l) 61 3 5248 8338
Email: [email protected]
www.proangler.com.au

#15 Sean Juan

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Posted 04 January 2005 - 12:00 PM

Geez thats funny because I've never once seen a canoe outside of a salt pond, yet I've been out to Stellwaggon in my yak, even came within a few dozen yards of a Humpback whale. All this time the canoe was a better vessel - who knew.




F'ing the ineffable since 1974