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Water bug


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#1 Bill_729

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 09:15 PM

This summer while I was pond fishing in Indiana, I regularly saw on the water these things that resembled what I used to call Pill-Bugs as a kid -- except not being near the water I never saw one in the water at that time.   They were quite close to the shore.

 

The ones I saw were there by the dozens, and actively swimming in circles amongst themselves.

 

My brief Internet search suggests I may possibly not be far off on what I saw. 

 

Please further my knowledge a bit, if you can.  Assuming the fish would be interested, what would you tie to imitate these, and how would you fish it?  : )

 

Regards,

Bill


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#2 mikechell

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    I LOVE SNOW ITS SO FLUFFY!!!!!!!

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 09:51 PM

Whirlygigs ... or ... scuds.

 

As far as I know, fish don't eat whirlygigs.

 

There's a ton of patterns for scuds ... Kimo does the best ones and those pictures are on the "flies from the bench" thread.


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#3 Bill_729

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 11:25 PM

Whirlygigs ... or ... scuds.

 

As far as I know, fish don't eat whirlygigs.

 

There's a ton of patterns for scuds ... Kimo does the best ones and those pictures are on the "flies from the bench" thread.

 

I saw some nice pictures there.  I didn't see any dry flies (but I came away with an idea of how to make some).   What does Kimo generally use for what I'll inappropriately call the "wing cover" (in this case it would be the body)?  I have a turkey wing feather, but not really the right color. But I'm willing to give it a shot.  ; )  What's the worst thing that can happen...

 

Bill


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#4 tjm

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Posted 21 November 2019 - 08:48 PM

Since both the woodlouse and cress bug   are called sowbugs, I'd guess scud. I don't know what anyone else uses for the back/shell but i have used raffia and cut strips of sandwich bags, I'm sure they sell scud/sowbug/shrimp/cressbug specific materials.



#5 redietz

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 12:38 AM

Since both the woodlouse and cress bug   are called sowbugs, I'd guess scud. I don't know what anyone else uses for the back/shell but i have used raffia and cut strips of sandwich bags, I'm sure they sell scud/sowbug/shrimp/cressbug specific materials.

Although both are crustaceans, cressbugs (isopods), aka sowbugs  are different critters than scuds (amphipods), aka "freshwater shrimp"  (they're not shrimp but resemble them.).

 

Both are very common in spring creeks, and both are usually fished as nymphs. 

 

Just goggle "cress bug" and you'll come across any numbers of patterns for the pillbugs.


Bob


#6 tjm

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 07:59 AM

patterns are interchangeable? or just so similar that I can't tell the difference?



#7 redietz

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 10:41 AM

patterns are interchangeable? or just so similar that I can't tell the difference?

 

I carry a variety, but I'm not sure it's necessary.  The most common pattern in the Cumberland Valley spring creeks is just muskrat fur bunched thick in a dubbing loop and trimmed flat on the top and bottom and rounded into an oval when viewed from above.  From what I've seen out west, they tend to favor an ostrich herl version.

 

I once watched a guy cleaning up in a spring creek by the simple expedient of using a small foam beetle, with a few split shot ahead of it,

 

Size is probably more important than any other aspect.  


Bob


#8 Bill_729

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Posted 24 November 2019 - 06:29 AM

Thank you for the tips!   I had fun studying all of the examples I found online.  I'll cut up some sandwich bags too!

 

Bill_729.


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