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17 replies to this topic

#16 Flicted

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 10:16 AM

Side track - I was stationed at an Army Post in Utah and tied with the Outdoor Rec guy Frank Marcotte. He got a kick out of my comedic versions of flies and called them Mike's Flicted Flies. Examples were bead head dry flies, cased caddis which was actually a narrow oval shaped rock tied to a hook shank, anatomically correct female adams... The name "Flicted" stuck.

I guess my main point is that most flies are difficult to tie and to make them look right with materials that are of lesser quality. My beginner kit gave me the basic tools, I agree. I still use some of them 35 years later. But a beginner that picks up good quality and color of fur, feathers, thread, and other materials to tie a selection of beginner flies will have a better foundation to build upon. Assortments are normally of lesser quality and could lead to frustration. I also started out substituting a lot because what I had on hand was "close enough". I struggled often until I tried those same flies with the right materials and my confidence grew from there.

#17 SilverCreek

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 05:06 PM

I guess my main point is that most flies are difficult to tie and to make them look right with materials that are of lesser quality. My beginner kit gave me the basic tools, I agree. I still use some of them 35 years later. But a beginner that picks up good quality and color of fur, feathers, thread, and other materials to tie a selection of beginner flies will have a better foundation to build upon. Assortments are normally of lesser quality and could lead to frustration. I also started out substituting a lot because what I had on hand was "close enough". I struggled often until I tried those same flies with the right materials and my confidence grew from there.

 

You are correct that good quality materials make good flies.

 

Manufactured materials like superfine polyro dry fly dubbing and tying thread are materials that are consistent and can be bought from any fly shop.

 

However some materials like fur, feathers, hackle, deer and elk hair need to be examined before buying. These are materials that are harvested and the quality of the materials varies. Unfortunately, a beginning fly tyer has not idea how to grade materials or tell what is excellent vs what is good vs what is crap. Hackle has gotten a lot more consistent but other feathers like partridge for soft hackles, peacock herl, marabou, CDC, all vary in quality.

 

Deer and elk hair especially needs to be bought individually rather in sealed packages. Deer and elk hair for elk hair caddis patterns, vs comparaduns, vs stimulators, vs hoppers, require different types of hair. Hair that is great for stimis will tie a terrible comparadun. Virtually all deer and elk hair comes from hunters. Some is tanned and some is just salted. I prefer tanned hair.

 

Deer and elk hunting season is in the fall, and the hair grows longer during the hunting season as winter approaches. So "early season" hair is shorter than late season hair. The hair also varies with the species and mule deer hair is different from white tail deer hair is different from elk hair. It also varies from where on the animal the hair came from. 

 

I don't think beginning fly tyers are aware of this. Anything that is NOT manufactured varies and few natural materials are suitable for all fly patterns. 

 

Read these articles if you are interested in more information about hair :

 

https://midcurrent.c...hair-selection/

 

https://globalflyfis...cting-deer-hair

 

https://globalflyfis...uying-deer-hair

 

I would suggest going to a fly shop and looking at the hair to choose what you want. If you need to order, I suggest Blue Ribbon Flies in West Yellowstone, MT. You should tell them what fly you will be tying and what the size range of those flies will be.


Regards,

Silver

"Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

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#18 Poopdeck

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 06:23 PM

We should keep in mind that opinions are never "flawed". If you disagree, that's your opinion (also not flawed).


I don't think it is but If this is a response to my post, I hope you realize that my use of the term flawed opinion was just a quote of fishnphils use of the term. It was in no way a statement that his opinion is flawed. It's clear that my post is a affirmation of his point. Just pointing that out since we're all feeling good.