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What’s the best bugger technique?


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27 replies to this topic

#16 Pyme Fisher

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Posted 20 December 2019 - 10:00 PM

I tie in everything at the back, then counter wrap the wire to give the hackle extra security, and tie off everything again at the front.

I never liked the idea of a "loose end" held down with nothing more than wire.

I can't see the point, other than "because you can".

#17 McFlyLures

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Posted 20 December 2019 - 11:23 PM

I tie in everything at the back, then counter wrap the wire to give the hackle extra security, and tie off everything again at the front.

I never liked the idea of a "loose end" held down with nothing more than wire.

I can't see the point, other than "because you can".


Ive never had issues with it, but I totally get the concern there. Usually I find the wire one to be more durable than just tying off at the back. However tying off at the back and using wire, I see where that would be the most durable. I just dont meet too many people doing it that way. Ill test that version out soon. Thanks

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#18 McFlyLures

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Posted 20 December 2019 - 11:32 PM

Like Mike I don't have a lot of luck with woolly buggers.  I don't use either of the tying styles in the video.  I carry three woolly bugger variations in my boxes.  The White River Demon, the Chili Pepper and the Catskill Killer.  I don't usually weight mine with lead wire.  I use bead head for weight.  Sometimes I'll add eyes and build a UV resin head.    Best luck I've had is with smaller sizes, 16 and 18, mainly for trout.  I have some in size 4 and 6 in my bass/pan fish box.  Even tied a couple on some size 2 6xl hooks.   


So Im not familiar with the Catskill killer, but the other two Definately are buggers, but like you said, variations. In reality, what I tied is a variation as well because it uses chenille rather than dubbing (tell me if Im wrong but from what I have heard, originals were tied with dubbing, and not chenille). Anyway, I dont know enough about the history of most flies to be confident on all that, but Im pretty sure I heard that somewhere. In fact many times Ill use dubbing myself instead, especially if I want a flashy bugger like the chili pepper you are describing. Ill use ice dub for the body in that sense. As for the lead vs bead head. I occasionally will tie with a cone head or bead head, especially if Im looking for that jigging action. But I like the lead wire for some weight, but a more even sink, if thats what Im looking for. I carry both in my box. Anyway, thanks for the reply here.

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#19 vicente

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Posted 22 December 2019 - 11:29 PM

I think to a certain extent it's going to depend on where you fish as well, whose open rivers or streams work mostly grass on the banks, your fly will probably be on your line for a few fish at least (or a decent amount of time depending on how the day is going) many of the streams I fished growing up and even now fishing flys that you expect to lose often before you get one fish is the norm, in those kinds of places I fish whatever is fastest to tie, or came out ugly off the vise but is still fish able.

Personally I just tie dubbing buggers not as pretty but they look buggy and get the job done.

#20 retrocarp

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 01:01 AM

Good video.

 

I tied up some wooley buggers in several colors a while back.  I didn't catch enough fish with them to keep using them.  I don't tie very many, anymore.

Hey Mike a lot depends on your retrieve ....I find super slow brings the fish on ie. figure of eight retrieve real slow zzzzzzzzz lol


Nick


#21 retrocarp

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 01:08 AM

The wooly bugger is one of the most versatile and widely used streamer patterns ever created. Because of this, multiple ways of tying it have evolved. Today I am demonstrating the two most popular ways, and you can decide which you find the best. The first way is by far the quickest and easiest way, however I do find that it can occasionally come undone and therefor is not as durable. The 2nd way is the most durable that I have used, however it takes a bit longer to tie. Please let me know which ways you like best, and tell me what your favorite is.

Nice video Shaun ....I use several different methods including the to shown .


Nick


#22 McFlyLures

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 08:16 PM

Thanks retro, yeah Im the same, many techniques for me as well including ones I didnt mention. I will say my most common way of tying is with the 2nd technique though.

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#23 Philly

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 11:36 PM

 

Like Mike I don't have a lot of luck with woolly buggers.  I don't use either of the tying styles in the video.  I carry three woolly bugger variations in my boxes.  The White River Demon, the Chili Pepper and the Catskill Killer.  I don't usually weight mine with lead wire.  I use bead head for weight.  Sometimes I'll add eyes and build a UV resin head.    Best luck I've had is with smaller sizes, 16 and 18, mainly for trout.  I have some in size 4 and 6 in my bass/pan fish box.  Even tied a couple on some size 2 6xl hooks.   


So Im not familiar with the Catskill killer, but the other two Definately are buggers, but like you said, variations. In reality, what I tied is a variation as well because it uses chenille rather than dubbing (tell me if Im wrong but from what I have heard, originals were tied with dubbing, and not chenille). Anyway, I dont know enough about the history of most flies to be confident on all that, but Im pretty sure I heard that somewhere. In fact many times Ill use dubbing myself instead, especially if I want a flashy bugger like the chili pepper you are describing. Ill use ice dub for the body in that sense. As for the lead vs bead head. I occasionally will tie with a cone head or bead head, especially if Im looking for that jigging action. But I like the lead wire for some weight, but a more even sink, if thats what Im looking for. I carry both in my box. Anyway, thanks for the reply here.

 

The Catskill Killer was shown at meeting of a fly tying/fly fishing club by a guy who was a guide on the Upper Delaware.  He tied it in large sizes to imitate the alewives that were washed out of the reservoir on the West Branch.  Fairly simple, yellow marabou tail, yellow hackle, pearl crystal or sparkle chenille body.  Weighted or unweighted.  I have no idea about how the original woolly buggers were tied.  By the time I learned how to tie them the bodies were chenille.  Not his pattern, but Tony Spezio taught me the Chili Pepper, when he was still living in NJ.   There was specific type of copper sparkle chenille used, which I was able to find.  He may have been pulling my leg but he insisted the key to the fly was using Burnt Orange marabou for the tail.  That is hard to find.  I think everyone has a fly that doesn't work for them most of the time.  I have two, the woolly bugger and the Clouser Minnow.   


"All things considered, I'd rather be in Philadelphia."

#24 tjm

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Posted 24 December 2019 - 12:35 AM

http://olivethewooll.../russ-blessing/

as the originator tied them

WoollyBuggers.jpg

an interview with Russel Blessing's son- https://flylifemagaz...nted-come-form/

 

but to me the original Woolly Bugger had olive chenille body, black hackle and marabou tail. Dad always believed that the more movement in the water from the hackle and tail the better. His Buggers always looked that way.

 



#25 McFlyLures

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 01:58 AM

Tjm, those are some supper buggy buggers, and they are tied with such supple hackle. Where do you think this hackle can be gotten from? I like it. It probably flows well in the water.

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#26 DarrellP

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 05:38 AM

I just got some dubbing with legs in it from ftd. What the heck...gonna try it. Also got some synthetic hackle to try. Trying to get into synthetics a bit.

I like tying them with semi seal dubbing for the body (Denny Rickards) and counter wrapped with wire. I prefer using brass or lead eyes, or cones for wt. Have used orange cones/ beads to make an egg suckling WB for Steelhead.

Caught my only trout over 20 inches with a Brown (Cinnamon ) gold bead WB.
"Calling fishing a hobby is like calling brain surgery a job." John Geirach

#27 tjm

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 05:41 AM

@McFlyLures, the article/interview didn't say, but since this was a while, 1967,  before genetic hackle was invented, I would guess an India rooster, bottom of the neck or maybe saddle, maybe India hen. When I started tying about '76 India capes were by far the most common feathers available.  Black was always dyed. I believe those feathers are quite webby, I know the first recipe I saw for these flies called for long webby feathers. One of the other guys might know more.



#28 vicente

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Posted 25 December 2019 - 09:19 PM

I just got some dubbing with legs in it from ftd. What the heck...gonna try it. Also got some synthetic hackle to try. Trying to get into synthetics a bit.

I like tying them with semi seal dubbing for the body (Denny Rickards) and counter wrapped with wire. I prefer using brass or lead eyes, or cones for wt. Have used orange cones/ beads to make an egg suckling WB for Steelhead.

Caught my only trout over 20 inches with a Brown (Cinnamon ) gold bead WB.


The super kraken makes some killer buggers.