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Pontoon boat anchor systems


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8 replies to this topic

#1 mdmayo

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Posted 15 February 2005 - 08:17 PM

I have a WaterSkeeter RT II and have set up the anchor per the instructions and have a difficult time raising and lowering it from the seat in the water. Is there a better way to run the rope or modify the pullies? I have a 8# pyramid anchor and a vertical pully on the anchor/motor mount bar.

Thanks dunno.gif

#2 VARick

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 09:03 AM

I have a Waterskeeter as well and had trouble with the anchor system as configured. I ended up running the line down the middle of the boat and under my storage platform behind the seat. Not the best setup with my kayak anchor and I'll see about redoing next time I have the boat out and get some pics hopefully.
Rick

#3 Shoe

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 01:52 PM

Watch anchoring those in fast current. If that anchor happens to catch while moving, the height of the mount bar may allow the craft to flip backward.

bugeyes.gif laugh.gif

I use a couple of strands of chain. I just tickle the bottom with it and it keeps the boat from spinning while fishing.

In a lake that really doesn't become an issue.

Another great system for rivers is to take one of the heavy duty clamps from a set of retired jumper cables and tie a rope to it. You can clamp yourself to any shoreline brush.

We also installed a larger pulley on the back of mine. It seems to help some.
I know where they live, I know what they eat. Now it's time to fool them with thread, feathers and roadkill.

#4 Steelheader69

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 07:22 PM

I'm curious what type of pulleys you have on the boat. Haven't looked at a skeeter in awhile. Chances could be that the rope you have may be to big for the pulleys. That has been one of the first problems I've spotted on anchor systems. You can do some modifying of your own. But if the rope freely moves through it (you should have NO problem pulling an 8# anchor), then you could use the pulley method (like a tack/block system). Take and attach a pulley to your anchor. Easiest way to do it is to grab a marine grade pulley and get a heavy duty carabiner to attach the pulley support to the anchor (this way the pulley is facing up, while the open ring attaches to carbiner to the open ring in the anchor). Next, feed your anchor line over the rear pulley (where the anchor line comes out and attaches to anchor usually) and feed that through the pulley of the anchor. Then take the end of the line and attach it near the rear pulley arm (may have to tie to the support arm or drill a hole so you can attach a heavy carabiner or lock ring to attach the rope to). This will dramatically decrease the pull weight on your anchor. Just make sure you have more anchor line though, since you'll be using twice as much. A 20' drop would require about 40' of rope.

#5 Shoe

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Posted 17 February 2005 - 08:21 AM

Those are pretty chicken shit pulleys, Jerry. Hitting West Marine for a decent one is a good idea. Also the cleat that one ties it off on is way too short. Airhead was kind enough to change it for me.

It's also a good idea to tie a knot in the end of the anchor rope in case the cleat fails.
I know where they live, I know what they eat. Now it's time to fool them with thread, feathers and roadkill.

#6 Steelheader69

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Posted 17 February 2005 - 04:48 PM

Ah, ok, haven't really looked at the skeeters in a long time. I know all the pulleys on my boats are sailing grade which I buy from Westmarine in fact, funny you mention them.

One word of warning though about a knot at the end of the anchor rope. If you do hang up, you want that rope to be able to swing free out of the pulleys. So if you knot them and hit hard water (not whitewater, but strong current) your boat will get pulled under if that knot grabs (depending on the pulley system used). So be careful of that one. Which, I actually had to slice a friend free (almost sliced his tubes doing it) when his anchor accidentally released on his old outcast. Knot grabbed in rear pulley. Wasn't super fast current, but enough that his boat was mostly submerged (and this was slack water compared to most rivers). I came up behind him with knife in hand and slashed at his achor rope as I collided with his pontoon boat. The force of his boat popping up almost jammed his tube into my knife. Luckily, it just deflected off the knife and somehow the knife landed on my tubes and not in the water.

#7 mdmayo

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Posted 17 February 2005 - 09:58 PM

Thanks for the tips. The rope does slide easily through the pulley(s). When sitting in the seat; the rope cleat is on the left side of the frame. The rope is run back to the anchor / motor rail and has to make almost a 90 deg. redirection to the last pulley. I was toild this was how it was supposed to be run. On some of the newer boats I have seen that the anchor rope travels down inside the frame to the back.
Thanks again.... wink.gif

#8 Steelheader69

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Posted 17 February 2005 - 10:24 PM

Ok, since it's running freely through the pulleys, I'd suggest doing that trick with the pulley on the anchor. You DO NOT want the rope going through the frame. Problem with this is it can build up gunk and dirt inside the frame. First, if it's a steel frame it'll lead to standing water which will help rust the frame. Next, that grit can actually jam up the pulleys faster and quicker then ones sitting out. If you have the money, put all new pulleys all the way through. But if they're sliding freely, and you're only using an 8# anchor, try doing the pulley trick.

#9 mdmayo

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Posted 17 February 2005 - 10:27 PM

Ok I'll try that.... thanks