Jump to content


 Welcome to FlyTyingForum.com


FlyTyingForum.com is the largest fly tying community in the world and we hope you take a moment to register for a free account and join this amazingly friendly and helpful group of anglers. FTF has over 12,000 registered members that have made over 300,000 posts and have uploaded over 6,000 patterns to our exclusive fly pattern database!

If you are an experienced fly tier or just starting out FTF is the perfect place to call home. Click Here To Register for a Free Account

Fly Pattern Database / Browse by Topics / Browse by Material / Fly Tying Bench Database / Fly Fishing & Tying Videos / FTFCurrent(NEW!)
Featured Products: Fly Tying Hooks / Fly Tying Scissors / Waterproof Fly Boxes
Photo

My Take On A Couple of Reels


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#16 tjm

tjm

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 652 posts

Posted 16 July 2018 - 05:48 PM

I've never had a fish big enough to have to use the reel, about 4# is my largest on fly rod, I do use the reel as quick as possible if bank fishing just so I don't step on the piled up line. and some times get them onto the reel if they make a run that gives me opportunity to. That's pretty rare in small to medium streams.

It must be a day's work to land a fish that runs to the backing. Just got to thinking about all the simple spring click reels that have been used for so many years. No drag and no balance just a spool and clicker.

 

So, the question for you guys that regularly use the reel, do you fish from the reel or have to get a bunch of line out of a pile or basket and onto the reel as you are fighting that hot fish?



#17 Rocco

Rocco

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,019 posts

Posted 17 July 2018 - 06:02 AM

You have too hold loose line off the reel if you are shooting iine and of course you don't reel in line on retrieves only to strip it out again.  Once your casting distance is set that line stays out til you need the reel in a fight. Then, once a solid hooking is in place, the line goes back on the reel.  Doing this also avoids line tangles around your feet, water weeds/rocks, and all that crap hanging from you.

 

Rocco



#18 spiralspey

spiralspey

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 247 posts

Posted 17 July 2018 - 07:26 AM

I try and get a fish on the reel only if there's a maximum of maybe 10-15 feet of slack line to reel up, and I can tell it's a strong enough fish that it will end up taking some line once I get it on the reel. Smaller fish I strip in. I much prefer it if the fish take up any slack and get themselves on the the reel. Sometimes even a big fish will run at you first or just sit and shake it's head for a while. That's when I pick up the slack line and try and get it on the reel so that when it decides to run I can let the reel do the work.

#19 Ron1697

Ron1697

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 41 posts

Posted 18 July 2018 - 12:06 PM

Whenever I am smallmouth fishing I always try to get to the reel. They are known to make unexpected powerful runs. Almost had one snap a 7 wt when my tangled line I was stripping in got caught in the first guide.



#20 Tom Cummings

Tom Cummings

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 362 posts

Posted 18 July 2018 - 11:33 PM

If a fish can take up slack and of size or strength only then is it on reel. Drag set light and controlled by palm. Otherwise it is always stripped in then released then cast out at my predetermined distance that I wanted. I never actually try to get a fish on reel as In doing so is to chance a loss.

#21 Poopdeck

Poopdeck

    You damn kids, get off my lawn!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,324 posts

Posted 21 July 2018 - 09:18 AM

I've never reeled in a fish on a fly rod simply because, being a spin fishermen as well, I think fly reels suck for that. Fight the fish with the rod, palm the reel and strip the line in. Just feels more natural to me then using the fly reel. But like you, I've never caught anything bigger then six or seven pounds on a fly rod.

#22 tjm

tjm

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 652 posts

Posted 21 July 2018 - 10:39 AM

I have seen some fly fishers that used the reel like a reel  even on trout, don't know why or where they learned that.

It has always been a wonderment to me why so many pay such exorbitant prices for a line carrier. If that is it's main function.

I have always used Medalist and think the USA made are better than most production reels, once Orvis thought so too, they have a functional drag that works. Most reels don't. But as I recall they weren't exactly cheap to buy. 



#23 vicrider

vicrider

    Advanced Member

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,581 posts

Posted 22 July 2018 - 09:48 AM

Like a lot of older guys with a small amount of extra money from selling a couple of boats and bikes I went through the buying phase and had to track down LHW Hardy Perfects, had every one of the lightweight lineup, and even had a titanium reel that cost more than most new, off the bench bamboo builds. Most of those reels sold from $250 and up and though there are a couple I wish I'd have kept I slowly sold them off to pay for what was more important. Money to go on trips to actually use the gear instead of just admiring it in OK. Now I still have a Hardy Cascapedia since it  was my favorite and balances and looks right on one of my bamboo rods I still have. Other than that you will find me fishing most Medalists again, a couple of lower priced LL Bean reels, and a vintage Shakespeare reel made in Redditch England by the Young people. I much prefer click and pawl reels versus disc drag and love the sound of running fish. To that end I put almost any fish of size on the reel quickly. Been doing that for years and it's ingrained in my actions now. Oh, I strip smaller fish but given the chance anything of size goes on the reel. 

 

For those who knock some of us who have had rods and reels costing more than some of us old folks first house, if we can afford it and take pride and care of our equipment, why should it bother someone who fishes a lowball combo off the shelf at Wal-Mart? If you're happy with your outfit and I'm happy with mind can't we all just get along. You might meet me on the water with a $3,000 bamboo and the $500 Hardy reel or one of my 50+ year old Shakespeare Wonderods and a Medalist, or perish the thought one of my old Perrine automatic reels. Let's just bs about the fish and the flies and the gear without concern for the high or low cost of it.



#24 dadofmolly

dadofmolly

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 45 posts

Posted 22 July 2018 - 04:08 PM

Vicrider::  "

For those who knock some of us who have had rods and reels costing more than some of us old folks first house, if we can afford it and take pride and care of our equipment, why should it bother someone who fishes a lowball combo off the shelf at Wal-Mart? If you're happy with your outfit and I'm happy with mind can't we all just get along. You might meet me on the water with a $3,000 bamboo and the $500 Hardy reel or one of my 50+ year old Shakespeare Wonderods and a Medalist, or perish the thought one of my old Perrine automatic reels. Let's just bs about the fish and the flies and the gear without concern for the high or low cost of it."

 

I couldn't agree more.  Off the original subject of the post: But would add why does it bother someone that I fish nymphs instead of dries (or the other way around), streamers vs emergers, why do some people feel the need to knock a tenkara rod instead of the readily accepted western style rod.  At my age I've seen many fads or styles come and go and the best part of fishing is meeting up with someone on the river lying about how big our last fish that got away really was.