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Traveling tying kit


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22 replies to this topic

#1 Husky9000

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 02:58 PM

I am a new tyer, just a few months. I want to take advantage of some of the free classes and tying nights that are available in my area.  I have completed a tying bench with vice and tools and supply storage.  but its not really mobile. 

 

I am in the process of putting a traveling tying box together.  I have a couple of options, and a second vise that is the identical model to my bench vise.  For now I'll load up tools and supplies till I see that the kit gets some real use...then I may invest in completing the kit.  I have a travel box that my son built in wood shop. Pics when I get it all together. 

 

Till then, what do you use for a travel kit?



#2 Bimini15

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:40 PM

I have used a big plano box before, the kind with tall sides and only one big compartment, and been surprised with how much I could fit.
The key for me was deciding what I was going to tie to have a clear idea of what I needed.

I have also used laptop cases. Those were nice because they had separate small pockets for tools, pockets/sleeves for hackle, etc. and you can fit a small portable station in the main laptop compartment. Again, know what you really need to pack or it will be heavy.
Bimini15

#3 Dave G.

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:43 PM

My travel kit is my kit period. I work out of it, with side pieces for added materials and such. I've been tying from the same box for about 30 years now. It's awesome, the same kit that has traveled to Maine many many times. All my tools are in it and of course it's highly portable so I can set up anywhere in the house. The problem now is I've added many materials so I have more than the box to carry at times but I could survive and did , very easily from it if need be, minus some of the fancy synthetics these days. It's a large Plano Over and Under model tackle box. Today they don't make this particular one any longer, they still make the model but the compartments are different. I guess I'd have to go with the next bigger one these days.


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#4 mikechell

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 05:33 PM

I travel all over the Country, and I have a travel box to take with me on the road.  But that's NOT what you need.

You are going to a clinic or tie-n-lie, so you don't need to take material with you.  

1)  You need the vise, with a clamp style and a pedestal base (since you don't know what kind of tables they'll have).

2)  You need one bobbin holder, two if you wish.  

3)  One white and one black spool of thread.  No need for a plethora of colors.  You'll be there to learn how to tie ONE fly.  When you get home, you can tie it in whatever color you wish.

4)  Basic tools: Two pair of scissors (one good, one for cutting wire), bodkin, dubbing spinner and whip finisher.

5)  Super glue and sealant (or nail polish) will round out a fair "tying night" kit.

 

You can always carry more, perhaps in a small, cloth tackle bag ... but you generally won't even get into it.


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#5 Al Beatty

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 08:52 AM

Hi Husky9000,

 

We've echo what Mike suggests. We maintain 2 travel kits for each of us. One is stored in a travel "shaving" kit and kept in our RV. The other is the one(s) we travel to show with and is stored in a rolling airline bag sized to fit in an airline overhead compartment. We use that rolling bag to travel across town to tie with friends or to fly to ??? to a show/demo/class, etc. Take care & ...


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#6 Fishsonora

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 04:44 PM

Attached File  Bucket Boss 1.jpg   144.76KB   1 downloadsAttached File  Bucket Boss 3.jpg   238.89KB   2 downloadsAttached File  Stuff inside Bucket Boss.jpg   205.7KB   1 downloads

 

Hi...I agree with Dave G ...my travel kit / bag is my main kit. Other then a few other things that I leave at home this kit goes everywhere with me....I might change out hook sizes or different materials but this IS my kit.

 

Bucket Boss 12" bag.....$12.00 at local hardware store or from their website.



#7 Poopdeck

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 07:16 PM

I have used a big plano box before, the kind with tall sides and only one big compartment, and been surprised with how much I could fit.
The key for me was deciding what I was going to tie to have a clear idea of what I needed.
I have also used laptop cases. Those were nice because they had separate small pockets for tools, pockets/sleeves for hackle, etc. and you can fit a small portable station in the main laptop compartment. Again, know what you really need to pack or it will be heavy.


Bims,
I like the idea of a laptop case. I probably gave 2 or 3 in the basement doing nothing.

#8 Bimini15

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 08:31 PM

Glad you do. I used it a couple of times to go on vacation. I brought tools and quite a few materials in it, and it worked well.
Bimini15

#9 keeper359

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 06:21 PM

I use a three drawer plastic tool chest for traveling it holds plenty of materials for any number/ style of flies I may tie and a smaller bag when I know I won't have the room for the bigger box or heading over to my local fly shop to tie a few flies in the afternoon with some friends.
We are only limited by our own imagination.

#10 flyty1

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 07:50 AM

Over the years, I have put together several "traveling fly tying kits". The first was when I first started tying and I could fit all of my materials and tools in a silverware chest I got from a flea market. The others have good tools and more/less quality materials - depending on the job. One is for tying and instructing at shows (so, 2 sets of tools) I carry this around in a big tool box. The next is an assortment of materials and decent tools all packed in a small soft sided carry-on bag; this goes with me on extended fishing trips. The last is just tools, hooks, and threads packed into a backpack - this is for tie & lie nights with a small group (add materials just for the patterns I want on a particular night).

#11 zfetcko

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 04:13 PM

I don't know what your budget is, but my fiance splurged and surprised me with a Fishpond fly tying bag for Christmas this year. It was such a great gift. I work out of town and spend a lot of time in hotels. It always goes with me and keeps me organized. There is no doubt that it is overkill and I am not suggesting that you need one or should even consider one, but you should check it out just to get an idea of the type pockets and padding and stuff that you may find useful in a travel kit. 



#12 Husky9000

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 09:40 AM

Thanks folks for all the input.  I cleaned up the box my son made me when he was in High School...it is way too big and it is just a wooden box with just the one compartment, so I put all my range kit stuff back in it and now I am on the hunt for a smaller bag...like the Bucket Bag or the computer/laptop bag. 

 

I looked at the fishpond bag...that is nice...and it did confirm for me that I need the pockets for tools and materials.  I am also looking at a bag I saw that the last tying night I attended...the guy got it from the Mil Surplus shop, it is a Travel Tool bag...it was very similar to the Bucket Bag...

 

Again thank you all for the ideas...



#13 Bimini15

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 04:25 PM

If you have a Harbor Freight or similar nearby, they have the tool type of bag at fairly reasonable prices. A cheap laptop case can be found in places like Ross. Hope it helps.
Bimini15

#14 j8000

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 10:15 PM

It is basically a slab of oak with dowels and drilled holes.  Very easy to move from room to room and I have two metal tool boxes where all my materials and tools go. 

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#15 Philly

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 03:38 PM

I use a large plastic tool box I picked up at Lowe's for $20 several years ago.  Double lid, the main compartment  holds my vise, it's base and whatever materials I decide I need to take with me.  That lid has smaller compartments that I can put some of my tools, bobbins, spools of thread, etc.   It's not something I would fly with but if I'm driving and plan on tying flies while at my destination or if my saltwater club has a table at a show or doing a tying demonstration, like we did yesterday at the LL Bean store in Marlton, NJ.    My usual problem is I bring to much material.  Concur with Mike and Al,  that you don't need something that large or elaborate for a tying class and you need just to bring the basics. When my club does a tying class, if you have a vise and tools you're welcome to bring, and the materials for any fly you want to learn.  Otherwise we have vises, materials to tie basic salt water and fresh water flies,  hooks and basic tools for the participants to use.


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